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Lawyer says Asia Bibi ‘wants to leave for Germany’

Asia Bibi, a Pakistani-Christian woman accused of blasphemy, was released from jail on Wednesday amid violent Islamist protests against her Supreme Court acquittal. But Bibi can reportedly still not leave the country. Bibi's lawyer, Saif-ul-Mulook,told the Bild am Sonntag German newspaper that Asia Bibi "would be happy if she could leave for Germany with her family." Bibi, who was acquitted by Pakistan's Supreme Court on blasphemy charges on October 31, is reportedly still in Pakistan despite her release from jail on Wednesday. Mulook fled Pakistan to the Netherlands a day after the court's decidion. Bibi's was one of the most high-profile blasphemy cases in Pakistan, with international rights groups and Western governments demanding a fair trial in her case. In 2015, Bibi's daughter met with Pope Francis, who offered prayers for her mother at the Vatican. Bibi was arrested in June 2009, after her neighbors complained she had made derogatory remarks about Islam's Prophet Muhammad. A year later, Bibi was sentenced to death, despite strong opposition from national and international human rights groups. Despite her acquittal by the Supreme Court, Bibi remained in prison due to Islamist protests, spearheaded by the Tehreek-e-Labbaik (TLP) party. Blasphemy is punishable by death in Pakistan, where 97 percent of its 180 million inhabitants are Muslims. Rights activists have demanded reforms of the controversial blasphemy laws, which were introduced by the Islamic military dictator General Zia-ul-Haq in the 1980s. Activists say the laws have little to do with blasphemy and are often used to settle petty disputes and personal vendettas Several European countries are willing to take Bibi and her family in, but it is unclear when she would be allowed to leave the South Asian country. What next for Bibi? Haroon Janjua, DW's correspondent in Islamabad, said Prime Minister Imran Khan's government wants to complete all legal requirements before Bibi, who is reportedly under protective custody currently, can leave the country. A review petition against Bibi's acquittal was filed right after the Supreme Court's October 31 verdict. The country's highest court is likely to make a decision on the petition in the next few days. Experts say it is unlikely that the top court's judges, including the Supreme Court's chief justice, would accept the petition, as it would require a larger bench to hear it. After violent protests against the suspension of Bibi's death erupted across the country, Khan's government opted to make a deal with Islamists to "avoid bloodshed." The move was heavily criticized by rights groups. But Khan recently told media that his government would not compromise on legal decisions. "I want to make it clear that the government stands with the decision of the Supreme Court and there will be no compromise on it," Khan said on Saturday. "The rule of law depends on following verdicts of the Supreme Court and if you do not follow the top court's decision then law finishes in the country," he added. Earlier this week, Bibi's attorney told S. Khan, DW's Islamabad correspondent, that he does not think that PM Khan's government has taken any U-turn on the Supreme Court's decision. "I believe that religious hardliners needed a way out, and the authorities gave them that. The conditions of the government-TLP agreement do not amount to the surrender of the state. Having said that, it is a citizen's constitutional right to file a review petition in the Supreme Court." "Almos all blasphemy cases in Pakistan are fabricated. There are people who misuse blasphemy laws. Even if there is a blasphemy charge against anyone, there should be a fair trial without fear and intimidation," Mulook added. Persecution of religious minorities Pakistan's Christians and other religious minorities have often complained of legal and social discrimination in their country. In the past few years, many Christians and Hindus have been brutally murdered over unproven blasphemy allegations. In one case, a young Christian girl with Down syndrome was accused in August 2012 of burning pages upon which verses of the Koran were inscribed. Rimsha Masih was taken into police custody and only released months later, when charges were dropped. The case caused an uproar in her hometown and beyond and sparked riots and violence against Christians in the region. In 2013, she and her family relocated to Canada. In 2014, a Christian couple was beaten to death for allegedly desecrating a copy of the Koran. Their bodies were subsequently burned in a brick kiln. In September last year, a Christian man in Pakistan was sentenced to death for sharing "blasphemous" material on WhatsApp.

Asia Bibi, a Pakistani-Christian woman accused of blasphemy, was released from jail on Wednesday amid violent Islamist protests against her Supreme Court acquittal. But Bibi can reportedly still not leave the country. Bibi’s lawyer, Saif-ul-Mulook,told the Bild am Sonntag German newspaper that Asia Bibi “would be happy if she could leave for Germany with her family.” Bibi, who was acquitted ... Read More »

Women struggle to survive Greece’s notorious refugee camp

Women stranded as refugees on the Greek island of Lesbos face daily violence, never-ending asylum procedures and horrible living conditions. DW's Marianna Karakoulaki spoke with some of them about their experiences. Amal, a young woman in her 20s, and her family fled the ongoing conflict at home in Yemen as well as limited opportunities for women. After a treacherous journey across the Aegean she arrived at Lesbos. Here she thought she would finally find the freedom she was looking for. Instead she was taken to Moria, Greece's largest refugee camp, which resembles an open-air prison. She describes it as hell on earth. Moria has been in the international spotlight repeatedly because of the dreadful circumstances. More than 7,000 people live in an area built for 3,100. High walls and a barbed-wire fence separate the main camp site from the tent city that spreads around it. The living conditions do not meet international standards and are not adequate for thousands of residents. People have to wait in lines for hours to receive their meals; the restrooms and showers are unhygienic; sewage water runs constantly through the camp to the road in front. Violence seems to have become the new normal, and people struggle to carry out every day activities. A recent report by Amnesty International on women and girls in Greek refugee camps describes how the severe overcrowding can be especially threatening to women. Indeed, living in Moria is even worse for women than it is for men. 'Better off dead' Amal recounts in vivid detail how she witnessed a man beating a woman until she bled. The assault took place in front of Greek police who ignored it and later blamed the woman for 'hanging out with such men.' "The situation in Moria is unfair for women," Amal says. Her portrayal of daily life at the camp is striking. Even simple tasks such as going to the restroom can be dangerous. Although men are not allowed near the women's restrooms, they are always there, she says. One of her friends was recently harassed by an older man at the women's restrooms. She managed to run away before anything worse happened. "Sometimes I think it would have been better to have died in the sea rather than be in this place," Amal says. "As a feminist I learned that I should not be afraid of anything. But I am afraid of never leaving this place," she continues. This fear is the reason why Amal would prefer to be anonymous. She has heard rumors that if refugees say something negative about the camp, their asylum cases may be affected. That fear was shared by every person living in Moria who spoke to DW. "Being a feminist and a refugee at the same time is extremely hard. We have so many words to say during our asylum interview, but we have to keep quiet, because we want to leave here," Amal says. Amal wants to follow in the footsteps of her role model, Egyptian feminist Nawal El Saadawi, who defied patriarchal norms in her country and achieved her goals thanks to her education. Fix patriarchy and you fix everything Somayeh, who comes from Afghanistan, struggles to find something positive to say about Moria. She's thankful that she no longer lives there but in PIKPA, a self-organized camp for vulnerable refugees that is run by volunteers. Life in Moria was extremely difficult not only because of unhygienic conditions and long food lines but also because of the continuous violence in the camp When Somayeh speaks of her experiences as an Afghan woman her voice trembles even as she spits fire. She was a student at university before she got married, when her husband forced her to quit her studies. "Afghanistan is the country where the power is in the hands of the man. We can't work for women's rights there. I want equality but how can I face all men? I fight a lot for women, but I struggle for my [own] life," she says. Somayeh was a women's rights activist at home, neither an easy or safe task in such a patriarchal society. She firmly believes that women are not given many opportunities anywhere. Refugee women have even fewer. But to her, the solution to the problems displaced women in Europe face is not very complicated. "Europe needs to give women refugees knowledge; they need to educate them about women's rights. This will give them self-confidence. But they also need to provide them with safety," she says. 'Treat people as human beings' Even Kumi Naidoo, surely inured to sights such as Moria as a world-renowned activist and head of Amnesty International, was shocked by what he saw at the camp during a visit earlier this month. He was astonished by the women's strength in such a horrible situation, he told DW, and underlined a specific need to focus on women refugees. "Women suffer more vulnerabilities; just based on the reality of the amount of sexual harassment and sexual violence that, sadly, women, especially from poor communities, face. On the other side, the resilience of the women — just to be able to survive, to keep a smile on their face and look for solutions to sort things out — takes emotional and spiritual resilience on a very high level," he told DW. Amal is one of those survivors. "My life is in the bottom of a lake in Iran, where I lost all of my documents," she says. But she has not let that stop her. Once she is granted asylum in Greece she plans to return to Moria to help other women refugees find the strength to fight inequality. Just as her feminist role models have done in the past. * Some quotes have been edited for clarity. Refugees' names and details that may identify them or their families have been altered or omitted

Women stranded as refugees on the Greek island of Lesbos face daily violence, never-ending asylum procedures and horrible living conditions. DW’s Marianna Karakoulaki spoke with some of them about their experiences. Amal, a young woman in her 20s, and her family fled the ongoing conflict at home in Yemen as well as limited opportunities for women. After a treacherous journey ... Read More »

Women Education In Pakistan

SYED KAMAL HUSSAIN SHAH Women's education in Pakistan is a fundamental right of every female citizen, according to article thirty-seven of the Constitution of Pakistan. Gender discrepancies still exist in the educational sector. According to UNDP report, Pakistan ranked 120 in 146 countries in terms of Gender-related Development Index, and in terms of Gender Empowerment Measurement (GEM) ranking, it ranked 92 in 94 countries.Education is a critical input in human resource development and essential for the country's economic growth. It increases the productivity and efficiency of individuals, and it produces a skilled labor force that is capable of leading the economy towards sustainable growth and prosperity. The progress and wellbeing of a country largely depends on the education choices made available to its people. It can be one of the most powerful instruments of change. It can help a country to achieve its national goals via producing minds imbued with knowledge, skills, and competencies to shape its future destiny. The widespread recognition of this fact has created awareness on the need to focus upon literacy and elementary education, not simply as a matter of social justice but more to foster economic growth, social well-being, and social stability. In year 2006, the literacy rate in urban areas was recorded as 58.3% while in rural areas it was 28.3%, and only 12% among rural women. According to the government of Pakistan, total enrollment level of pre-primary in public sector was 4,391,144. Out of 4,391,144 pre-primary students, 2,440,838 are boys, and 1,950,306 are girls. It shows that 56% of enrolled students are boys, and 44% are girls. Further breakdown of these statistics into urban and rural enrollment levels reveals almost similar percentage of enrollment among boys and girls, i.e. in rural schools 57% are boys and 43% are girls. Private sector; There is a huge sector of private education in Pakistan. According to the government of Pakistan, 2,744,303 pre-primary students are enrolled in private schools. Among them, 1,508,643 are boys, and 1,235,660 are girls. It shows that 55% of enrolled kids are boys and 45% are girls. Of the total number, 39% students are in rural areas, and the percentage of enrolled boys and girls in rural areas are 58% and 42% respectively. The total enrollment in primary public sector is 11,840,719; 57% (6,776,536) are boys, and 43% (5,064,183) are girls. 79% of all the primary students in Pakistan are enrolled in rural schools, and the gender enrollment ratios are 59% and 41% for boys and girls respectively in rural Pakistan. Higher secondary; the overall ratio seems to equalize among boys and girls in higher secondary education. Women's education is so inextricably linked with the other facets of human development that to make it a priority is to also make change on a range of other fronts; from the health and status of women to early childhood care; from nutrition, water and sanitation to community empowerment; from the reduction of child laborand other forms of exploitation to the peaceful resolution of conflicts. The founder of Pakistan, Muhammad Ali Jinnah, was known to have a positive attitude towards women. After the independence of Pakistan, women groups and feminist organisations started by prominent leaders like Mohtarma Fatima Jinnah began working to eliminate socio-economic injustices against women in the country. In 1988, Benazir Bhutto became the first female Prime Minister of Pakistan, and the first woman elected to head a Muslim country but since its independence, the educational status of Pakistani women is among the lowest in the world. Women in Pakistan have progressed in various fields of life such as politics, education, economy, services, health and many more. In politics and activism, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa is planning to increase the percentage of women in the police force. Transgender issue is also there in Pakistan. In most South Asian nations, a concept of third gender prevails where members of the same are referred to those who are neither men norwomen. In 2009, the Pakistan Supreme Court ruled in favour of a group of transvestites. The landmark ruling stated that as citizens they were entitled to the equal benefit and protection of the law and called upon the government to take steps to protect transvestites from discrimination and harassment. Pakistan's chief justice Iftikhar Chaudhry was the architect of major extension of rights to Pakistan's transgender community during his term. Allama Iqbal Open University (AIOU) has announced to provide free education for transgenders across the country.The university, that offers distance learning, will offer education from matriculation to PhD as well as vocational training to transgenders without any charges. The students will be able to choose any subject they wish to study. The students who will enrol in the programme won't be required to come to university and educational equipment will be provided to them at their doorstep. Many other programs like prime minister training program transgender in it. Offering them free education and training, we hope to make them a part of mainstream society.

SYED KAMAL HUSSAIN SHAH Women’s education in Pakistan is a fundamental right of every female citizen, according to article thirty-seven of the Constitution of Pakistan. Gender discrepancies still exist in the educational sector. According to UNDP report, Pakistan ranked 120 in 146 countries in terms of Gender-related Development Index, and in terms of Gender Empowerment Measurement (GEM) ranking, it ranked ... Read More »

Over a hundred prominent women petition UN’s Ban for treaty to end Korean War

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has been petitioned by prominent women from 38 countries to bring a permanent peace to end the Korean War. The conflict ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. Women leaders from 38 countries have sent a letter to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon urging him to initiate a peace process that would officially end the Korean War before he leaves office. The letter was co-sponsored by Women Cross DMZ, which organized a peaceful walk across the demilitarized zone (DMZ) last year and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Ban, a former South Korean foreign minister, had promised such an initiative before taking office in 2007. North and South Korea technically remain at war because the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty. As a result the DMZ, separating the two Koreas is the most heavily fortified border in the world. The letter to Ban was signed by 132 women, including 22 from South Korea. It urges Ban to initiate a peace process via the UN Security Council with the aim of concluding it by 2018, "the 70th anniversary of Korea's division into two separate states." At a press conference to announce the letter, Cora Weiss, president of the Hague Appeal for Peace said: "The secretary-general has the opportunity to build on his own legacy as the world's most important peacemaker." She added "Ban can demonstrate that nuclear threats can be met with a diplomatic recipe of engagement, lifting sanctions, and promise of trade and aid, in exchange for North Korea giving up its nuclear ambition." Napalm girl The signatories of the letter include American women's rights activists Gloria Steinem and Eve Ensler, Nobel Peace laureates Leymah Gbowee of Liberia and Mairead Maguire of Northern Ireland and UNESCO goodwill ambassador Kim Phuc. Phuc, more commonly known as ‘Napalm girl' became an international symbol for the horrors of war in 1972 when, as a 9-year-old girl, she was photographed running down a road screaming, after a napalm attack on her Vietnamese village. Valerie Plame, reported to be a CIA operative in 2003 also signed the letter. The initiative came as tensions continue to rise on the Korean peninsula. North Korea has alarmed its South Korean neighbor and their western allies with a series of nuclear and missile tests. In response, the US has agreed to deploy a sophisticated missile defense system, known as THAAD, in the South. Further tests by North Korea have accelerated plans for the anti-missile deployment. Daniel Russel, assistant secretary of state for East Asia, told a US congressional hearing that the timing was up to the Pentagon. But he added: "Given the accelerating pace of North Korea's missile tests, we intend to deploy on an accelerated basis - I would say as soon as possible."

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has been petitioned by prominent women from 38 countries to bring a permanent peace to end the Korean War. The conflict ended in 1953 with an armistice, not a peace treaty. Women leaders from 38 countries have sent a letter to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon urging him to initiate a peace process that would ... Read More »

Saudi Arabia picks princess to head women’s sports

Saudi Arabia has selected Princess Reema bint Bandar as the country's de facto minister for women's sports. This year, the kingdom doubled the number of its female athletes from two to four. Saudi's Cabinet announced on Tuesday that Princess Reema would head the General Authority for Sports without disclosing further details about her role. The daughter of the ex-ambassador to the US, Princess Reema spent much of her youth in Washington, D.C. "I am honored to serve my country," she was quoted as saying by the SPA state news agency. Female athletics have historically not been encouraged in the kingdom, though recently there have been calls for change. In an unprecedented move, one state school introduced sports for girls in 2014. Evolving on women's sports In an interview with Fast Company magazine, Princess Reema said she has been working to promote women's empowerment in the country. "Our society tend to change a bit slower than other," she told the magazine last year. "We have to explain to people that it's evolution, not Westernization." The Cabinet's announcement comes as the kingdom gears up for the 2014 Olympic Games in Rio, where four of its women athletes will compete alongside seven male athletes. That number represents an increase of 50 percent from the number of Saudi women who competed in the last Olympic games.

Saudi Arabia has selected Princess Reema bint Bandar as the country’s de facto minister for women’s sports. This year, the kingdom doubled the number of its female athletes from two to four. Saudi’s Cabinet announced on Tuesday that Princess Reema would head the General Authority for Sports without disclosing further details about her role. The daughter of the ex-ambassador to ... Read More »

US reports Zika infection through sex

Health officials in Texas have reported a case of the Zika virus being transmitted through sexual contact, and not a mosquito bite. The infected person is said to have acquired it from someone who traveled to Venezuela. Local health officials in Dallas on Tuesday reported a case of the Zika virus being sexually transmitted, heightening fears of the spread of the mosquito-born virus. It comes a day after the World Health Organization declared Zika an international public health emergency. "The patient was infected with the virus after having sexual contact with an ill individual who returned from a country where Zika virus was present," a statement from Dallas County Health and Human Services said. It later said on Twitter the country was Venezuela. The county said it had received confirmation of the case from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A CDC spokesman confirmed the results for a Zika infection but said local officials investigated the mode of transmission. Authorities said there were no reports of the virus being locally transmitted by mosquitoes. Sexual transmission not proven Only one possible person-to-person case of sexual transmission has been reported internationally. But health officials have said more evidence is needed to confirm whether Zika can be transmitted through sexual contact. The WHO has said the virusis spreading rapidly in the Americas and could infect 4 million people. A global response unit has been launched to fight the virus. Caution urged for women The virus has been linked to microcephaly, in which babies have abnormally small heads and improperly developed brains. Researchers believe that if a pregnant woman is bitten by an infected mosquito, particularly in the first trimester, she faces a higher risk of having a child with birth defects. The virus has now spread to 26 countries and territories including Brazil, which is the country hardest hit, with 3,700 suspected cases of microcephaly that may be linked to Zika. Brazilian authorities have vowed to proceed with the 2016 Olympics despite the health scare. Ireland reports first cases The first Irish cases of the virus were detected in two people with a history of traveling to an affected country, the country's Health Service Executive said on Tuesday. The two individuals are unrelated and neither is at risk due to pregnancy. They've been described as currently well and fully recovered. Meanwhile, Nicaragua confirmed its first two cases in pregnant women on Tuesday and Chile reported its first case of the virus. The race is on to find a vaccine to prevent the virus taking hold. There is no treatment or vaccine for Zika, which is in the same family of viruses as dengue fever. However, Germany has developed the first test for Zika.

Health officials in Texas have reported a case of the Zika virus being transmitted through sexual contact, and not a mosquito bite. The infected person is said to have acquired it from someone who traveled to Venezuela. Local health officials in Dallas on Tuesday reported a case of the Zika virus being sexually transmitted, heightening fears of the spread of ... Read More »

Mass grave of Yazidi women killed by ‘IS’ found in Iraq

Iraqi Kurdish forces have discovered a mass grave containing the bodies of women who were executed by the 'Islamic State' (IS). The UN has described the brutal campaign against the Yazidi minority as a possible genocide. The bodies of an estimated 80 Yazidi victims were found in a mass grave on the edge of the city of Sinjar in Iraq on Saturday, according to local reports. Kurdish forces discovered the grave while clearing bombs from the area which was recently reclaimed from 'IS' militants. Officials were able to locate the grave based on information provided by young women who witnessed the executions and escaped IS enslavement. Although the grave has yet to be excavated, Miyasir Hajji, a local council member for Sinjar, told AFP that it is thought to contain the bodies of around 78 women who were 40 to 80 years-old. "It seems that the (IS) terrorist members only wanted young girls to enslave," Hajji said. Yazidi residents in Sinjar were targeted as part of an IS campaign which included mass murders, enslavement, and rape. 'Death would have been better' Clumps of hair, bones, money and keys were found at the grave site by the mayor of Sinjar and local Yazidis. The items allegedly belonged to older women from the village of Kocho who were separated from the young by IS militants during their attack. According to local survivors, after being separated, the older women were led behind a building and shot while the younger women were taken as sexual slaves. Reuters spoke with 24-year-old Badr Sleiman Taha from Kocho who said his mother, aunt and grandmother were among those shot behind the institute. While at the mass grave, he recognized the cane of an old woman from his village among the remains. "Death would have been better than what I felt when I saw that grave," Taha told Reuters by phone from Sinjar. Several mass Yazidi graves had already been discovered in the area north of Sinjar mountain, which was retaken from IS in December of 2014. Possible genocide The United Nations has already described the IS campaign against the Yazidis as a possible genocide. Mahma Xelil, the mayor of Sinjar, announced that the grave would remain undisturbed so that experts could collect evidence to help build their case. US President Barack Obama justified the country's air campaign against IS militants in the area last year by invoking the duty to prevent a Yazidi genocide. The Yazidi are a religious sect whose beliefs combine elements of several ancient Middle Eastern religions and are considered devil-worshipers by IS militants. Currently, Kurdish peshmerga forces are clearing explosive devices left by IS in Sinjar before Yazidi residents can return to their homes.

Iraqi Kurdish forces have discovered a mass grave containing the bodies of women who were executed by the ‘Islamic State’ (IS). The UN has described the brutal campaign against the Yazidi minority as a possible genocide. The bodies of an estimated 80 Yazidi victims were found in a mass grave on the edge of the city of Sinjar in Iraq ... Read More »

Witch-hunting villagers behead woman in India

بھارت میں مسلح دیہاتیوں نے تشدد کے بعد ایک 63 سالہ خاتون کا سر قلم کر دیا ہے۔ بھارتی پولیس کے مطابق دیہاتیوں کا الزام تھا کہ قتل کی جانے والی خاتون جادو ٹونے کرتی ہے۔ پولیس کے مطابق مونی اورنگ نامی پانچ بچوں کی ماں کے قتل کے الزام میں سات افراد کو حراست میں لیا گیا ہے۔ بھارت کی شمال مشرقی ریاست آسام میں ہندو مذہبی رہنماؤں کی طرف سے مذکورہ خاتون پر الزام لگایا گیا کہ جنتر منتر کر رہی تھی۔ اس کے بعد پیر 20 جولائی کو حملہ آوروں نے اس خاتون کو گھر سے باہر لے جا کر قتل کر دیا۔ سینیئر پولیس اہلکار مانابیندرا دیو رائے نے خبر رساں ادارے اے ایف پی کو بتایا، ’’خنجروں اور دیگر تیز دھار ہتھیاروں سے لیس حملہ آور گاؤں میں آئے اور انہوں نے مونی اورنگ کو اس کے گھر سے دور لے جا کر بے دردی سے اسے قتل کر دیا۔‘‘ پولیس اہلکار کا مزید کہنا تھا، ’’اس کا سر کاٹ دیا گیا اور اس کے جسم کے ٹکڑے کر دیے گئے۔‘‘ پولیس کی طرف سے لوگوں کو حراست میں لینے کے خلاف دیہاتیوں نے آج منگل 21 جولائی کو مقامی پولیس اسٹیشن کے باہر مظاہرہ بھی کیا ہے۔ اس گاؤں کے ایک رہائشی کا ایک مقامی ٹیلی وژن سے گفتگو کرتے ہوئے کہنا تھا، ’’مونی ایک جادو گرنی تھی اور وہ اپنے دشمنوں کے خلاف شیطانی اعمال کرتی تھی۔۔۔ اس طرح کے جادو گروں کے لیے کوئی جگہ نہیں ہے اس لیے اس کو قتل کرنا درست تھا۔‘‘ مقتولہ کے شوہر آر - اورنگ کے مطابق اس کی بیوی ’ایک معصوم عورت‘ تھی۔ اس نے مقامی ہندو مذہبی رہنماؤں پر الزام عائد کیا کہ انہوں نے شکوک و شبہات پیدا کیے اور لوگوں کو اکسایا۔ خبر رساں ادارے اے ایف پی کے مطابق بھارت کے بعض علاقوں میں آج بھی بڑے پیمانے پر جادو ٹونے پر یقین کیا جاتا ہے خاص طور پر غربت کے شکار اور قبائلی علاقوں میں۔ بعض واقعات میں خواتین کو برہنہ کر کے انہیں سزائیں دی جا چکی ہیں، یہ پھر انہیں زندہ جلایا اور گھروں سے نکال کر قتل کیا جا چکا ہے۔ بھارت کی بعض ریاستوں نے جن میں جھاڑکھنڈ بھی شامل ہے، ایسے خصوصی قوانین متعارف کرائے ہیں جن میں جادوگری کا الزام لگا کر کسی کے خلاف جرائم کی روک تھام کی کوشش کی گئی ہے۔

A 63-year-old has been beheaded in India’s eastern state Assam after she was accused of being a witch. Over 2,000 people have been killed in the last two years for allegedly being involved with the occult and sorcery. Moni Orang was attacked in Assam by around 150 villagers, who accused her of practicing witchcraft, police said on Tuesday. Regional police ... Read More »

Single mothers in India not compelled to disclose father’s identity: Supreme Court

India's topmost court has ruled that an unwed mother can be the sole legal guardian of her child and refuse to divulge the identity of the child's father. The landmark ruling was welcomed by women's rights activists. Single women in India would now be able to claim sole guardianship of their children without naming the father or needing his consent, the Supreme Court of India ruled. The court overturned previous decisions that required a mother to get the father's permission before claiming sole guardianship of child born out of marriage. The court made its decision in a case filed by a single mother after lower courts in New Delhi told her that she needed to reveal the biological father's identity so that she could be the legal guardian of her child. Her lawyers argued in court that she had been raising her 5-year-old without any help from the biological father, who was not aware of the child's existence. "In this scenario, the interest of the child would be best served by appointing the appellant (the mother) as the guardian," Judges Vikramjit Sen and Abhay Manohar Sapre stated. "Furthermore… her own fundamental right to privacy will be violated if she is compelled to disclose the name and particulars of the father of her child," the judges added. According to the current law in India, a mother needs to get the permission of the child's father before she claim sole legal guardianship. Rights activists in India have lauded the latest decision, calling it a step forward for women's rights. Karuna Nundy, a lawyer at India's Supreme Court, tweeted her views: "Great, needed to start bringing Guardianship laws in line with equality".

India’s topmost court has ruled that an unwed mother can be the sole legal guardian of her child and refuse to divulge the identity of the child’s father. The landmark ruling was welcomed by women’s rights activists. Single women in India would now be able to claim sole guardianship of their children without naming the father or needing his consent, ... Read More »

Wolfsburg women win German Cup

Wolfsburg's men's football team may only be second best in the Bundesliga, but the women's team sets the standard in Germany. On Saturday, the Wolves beat Turbine Potsdam 3-0 to take the German Cup. Right from the start, Wolfsburg jumped all over their opponents in the final in Cologne. In minute 12, a long ball from Nilla Fischer evaded the entire Potsdam defense to find 35-year-old veteran Martina Müller. She was as cool as her namesake Thomas, netting to put the Wolves on the road to victory. In fact, you could say that Potsdam got müllered. Wolfsburg continued to dominate for most of the first half, while Turbine finally got into the game in the final ten minutes before the halftime whistle. Still neither side could score, so the Wolves took their slim advantage into the dressing room. "The two teams essentially neutralized one another," remarked German national women's coach Silvia Neid at half-time. Müller almost doubled Wolfsburg's advantage immediately after the restart but keeper Anna-Felicitas Sarholz was on hand to keep the ball out. There was nothing Sarholz could on the hour mark, though, as Nina Pedersen fouled Alexandra Popp in the area. Müller stepped up to the spot and her penalty was too well-placed for Sarholz. The Wolves were up 2-0, and with Turbine failing to generate much in the way of chances, the match was essentially decided. Müller, who's retiring, turned provider in minute 70, slipping the ball to Popp who completed the scoreline. "It's great that she got two goals on a stage like this," Wolfsburg coach Ralf Kellermann said. "It's wonderful when you can end a career like that. The Cup was the second in the club's history and will compensate somewhat for Wolfsburg's unlucky departure from the Champions League at the hands of Paris Saint-Germain last week.

Wolfsburg’s men’s football team may only be second best in the Bundesliga, but the women’s team sets the standard in Germany. On Saturday, the Wolves beat Turbine Potsdam 3-0 to take the German Cup. Right from the start, Wolfsburg jumped all over their opponents in the final in Cologne. In minute 12, a long ball from Nilla Fischer evaded the ... Read More »

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