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Tensions rise between Malaysia and North Korea over Kim Jong Nam killing

Police are ratcheting up the pressure on the North Korean embassy in connection with the killing of the half brother of ruler Kim Jong Un. Meanwhile, a woman detained in connection with the attack said she was paid $90. Acknowledging that he had diplomatic immunity, police in Malaysia had initially phrased their interest in questioning Hyon Kwang Song, a second secretary at the North Korean Embassy in Kuala Lumpur, more in terms of a request. Police attitudes hardened Saturday when they threatened to issue an arrest warrent for Hyon if he did not voluntarily come in for questioning within a "reasonable" time frame, according to Abdul Samah Mat, the police chief leading the investigation. "If he failed to turn up... then we will go to the next step by getting a warrant of arrest from the court," Samah told journalists. But lawyer Sankara Nair noted that diplomats have immunity privileges even in criminal cases. "He has immunity no matter a criminal case or otherwise," he said. "Police can apply for a warrant, but it can easily be set aside by the embassy." Paid $90 for a 'prank' Meanwhile, one of the two women detained in connection with the February 13 murder at Kuala Lumpur's airport said she was paid $90 (85 euros) for what she thought was a prank, according to an Indonesian official . Andriano Erwin, Indonesia's deputy ambassador to Malaysia, made the comment Saturday, one day after Malaysian officials revealed that the VX nerve agent was used in the killing of Kim Jong Nam at Kuala Lumpur's airport. The suspect, Siti Aisyah, 25, also told officials that she did not want her parents to see her in custody. "She doesn't want her family get sad to see her condition," Erwin said after a 30-minute meeting with Aisyah. "She only delivered a message through us to her father and mother not to be worried and take care of their health." The two women walked up behind Kim and appeared to rub their hands on his face. They then walked away in opposite directions. Kim was dead a short time later. Malaysian police said Aisyah and the other female suspect, a Vietnamese woman who also is in custody, knew what they were doing. Malaysian police said the women were trained to go immediately to the washroom and clean their hands. Both women seen in the video are in custody. Sweep of the terminal Malaysian police said that officers from the police's chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear teams, as well as the hazardous materials unit under the fire department and the atomic energy board, would carry out a sweep of the terminal in the early hours of Sunday morning. The attack sparked fears in Malaysia that the airport had been contaminated. Officials said there was no danger but the cleaning operation is an apparent concession to public concerns. VX is an extremely powerful poison, with an amount no larger than a few grains of salt enough to kill. North Korea hit squad? The revelation that the VX nerve agent killed Kim has heightened speculation that North Korea had dispatched a hit squad to kill the older half brother of Kim Jong Un. The assassination also prompted the US to cancel back-channel talks in New York between North Korea and former US officials. The unofficial meeting planned for next week was abandoned when the State Department refused to issue visas for the North Korean diplomats coming from Pyongyang. It would have been the first such meeting between the two countries inside the United States in more than five years.

Police are ratcheting up the pressure on the North Korean embassy in connection with the killing of the half brother of ruler Kim Jong Un. Meanwhile, a woman detained in connection with the attack said she was paid $90. Acknowledging that he had diplomatic immunity, police in Malaysia had initially phrased their interest in questioning Hyon Kwang Song, a second ... Read More »

Malaysia slams Myanmar over Rohingya ‘genocide’

Malaysia has accused Myanmar of committing "genocide" against Rohingya Muslims. The bloody crackdown is quickly gaining a regional dimension. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak on Sunday called on the world to prevent an unfolding "genocide" carried out by Myanmar against Rohingya Muslims, as a vicious crackdown triggers an exodus of the persecuted ethnic minority. "Please do something. The UN do something. The world cannot sit and watch genocide taking place," Najib told a crowd of several thousand supporters and Rohingya refugees at a rally in Kuala Lumpur. Razak took direct aim at Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi and her new government for not doing enough as reports pour in that Myanmar's army is raping, murdering and torturing Rohingya in the western Rakhine state. "What's the use of Aung San Suu Kyi having a Nobel Prize?" asked the leader of the Muslim majority nation. "We want to tell Aung San Suu Kyi, enough is enough ... We must and we will defend Muslims and Islam," he said, calling on the Organization of Islamic Cooperation and ASEAN, the 10-country Southeast Asia organization, to act. Stateless and persecuted Several thousand Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh or been internally displaced since Myanmar's army cracked down on the group following an early October border incident in which unknown militants killed nine border guards. Myanmar's army blamed the attack on Islamist Rohingya militants and has rebuffed concerns over the subsequent crackdown as propaganda. Myanmar's 1.1 million Rohingya make up most of the population in the region of Rakhine. They are denied citizenship and suffer from institutionalized discrimination in Buddhist-majority Myanmar despite many of them having lived in the country for generations. There have been repeated reports Myanmar's military has gang raped women, murdered civilians and set ablaze Rohingya villages, pushing thousands of desperate people into neighboring Bangladesh. International observers, journalists and aid agencies face severe restrictions of movement while trying to verify the claims in the area. A top UN humanitarian official in Bangladesh last month accused Myanmar's army of "ethnic cleansing." Tensions rising in Southeast Asia The Rohingya issue has been a major test for Suu Kyi's new administration following decades of military rule. Her unwillingness or inability to do anything about the unfolding atrocities has garnered international criticism that she has done too little to address the plight of the Rohingya communities. But there is also recognition her administration is somewhat limited given the army still holds ministries responsible for security. Systemic discrimination and previous bouts of inter-communal violence between Myanmar's Buddhists and Rohingya sent waves of refugees to neighboring countries. There are more than 50,000 Rohingya in Malaysia, where critics point out that they face discrimination and live on the margins of society. Some observers say Razak is using the Rohingya issue to distract away from a financial corruption scandal. Myanmar's treatment of the Rohingya has gained a regional dimension as Indonesia and Bangladesh also call on the international community to take action. Several protests have been held in Indonesia, and last weekend authorities there arrested two militants allegedly planning an attack on Myanmar's embassy in Jakarta. Over the past several years the treatment against Rohingya has become a major issue across the Islamic world Earlier this week the United States' top diplomat for East Asia, Daniel Russel, warned that continued violence against the Rohingya threatened to incite jihadist extremism in Myanmar and neighboring Bangladesh. He also urged Malaysia and Indonesia to avoid stoking religious passion over the issue by organizing protests.

Malaysia has accused Myanmar of committing “genocide” against Rohingya Muslims. The bloody crackdown is quickly gaining a regional dimension. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak on Sunday called on the world to prevent an unfolding “genocide” carried out by Myanmar against Rohingya Muslims, as a vicious crackdown triggers an exodus of the persecuted ethnic minority. “Please do something. The UN do ... Read More »

Malaysia braces for more Zika infections

Health authorities in Malaysia have warned of an increase in Zika cases after the Southeast Asian country reported its first local infection. Neighboring Singapore, meanwhile, has seen a surge in new infections. Health Minister Subramaniam Sathasivam said Sunday that new cases were bound to emerge now that Zika had entered communities. The warning came a day after authorities confirmed the death of a 61-year-old Zika patient in the eastern state of Sabah in Borneo. Health officials said the man was the first patient to contract the virus locally, but that heart complications, rather than Zika, had caused his death. Subramaniam said authorities were working to trace the man's movements to determine other possible sources of infection. "This patient has not been to any other country where a large number of cases had been reported," the minister said on his Facebook page. "This means that this person contracted the disease locally. "It suggests that there are other infected people in the community who are potential sources of infection," Subramaniam added. The 61-year-old was only the country's second confirmed Zika case. The first reported patient, a 58-year-old woman, was infected after traveling to neighboring Singapore last week. Malaysian outbreak in the cards The Zika virus, mainly transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito, spread rapidly through a number of Latin American countries in 2015, prompting the World Health Organization to declare a public health emergency. Cases have since emerged in the US, Africa, Asia and the Pacific, but Brazil remains the hardest hit. Although Zika causes no symptoms in most people, it is considered particularly dangerous for pregnant women. The virus has been shown to cause microcephaly - a birth defect associated with abnormally small brains and heads in new born babies - as well as neurological disorders in some adults. Health authorities in Malaysia raised concerns about Zika after Singapore reported last week that it had more than 200 cases of the virus. Fight against dengue Malaysia's health system has already been stretched thin by dengue fever, which is also spread by the Aedes mosquito and can be fatal. Since the beginning of last year, the virus has infected almost 200,000 people and killed more than 500 in the Southeast Asian country. Amar Singh, head of the pediatric department at Malaysia's Hospital Raja Permaisuri Bainun, warned that this was one reason why Malaysia faced a much tougher struggle against Zika than its smaller neighbor. "Zika will spread even faster in Malaysia than Singapore because our Aedes volume is so much higher and the breeding grounds are enormous," he said. Malaysia, home to almost 30 million people, has boosted its efforts to screen travelers from abroad and increased insecticide spraying to kill mosquitoes. Health Minister Subramaniam on Sunday also urged Malaysians to clean up areas that could serve as breeding grounds for mosquitoes.

Health authorities in Malaysia have warned of an increase in Zika cases after the Southeast Asian country reported its first local infection. Neighboring Singapore, meanwhile, has seen a surge in new infections. Health Minister Subramaniam Sathasivam said Sunday that new cases were bound to emerge now that Zika had entered communities. The warning came a day after authorities confirmed the ... Read More »

Malaysia, Australia mark two years of MH370 disappearance

The Malaysian parliament has observed one minute of silence to mark the second anniversary of the plane's disappearance. Australia says it will continue to look for the aircraft. "We hope the relatives of the 239 people, including 50 Malaysians, will remain strong," Pandikar Amin, speaker of the Malaysian parliament, told the audience. Prime Minister Najib Razak said that the current search operation would end later this year. "We remain hopeful that MH370 will be found in the 120,000-square-kilometer (46,332-square-mile) area under investigation," he added. The Australia-led search for the plane, which disappeared en route to Beijing from Kuala Lumpur, has not yielded much until now. Last year, a piece of the plane was discovered by chance on the Indian Ocean island of Reunion, seemingly having washed up on shore there. Najib said this was further evidence that the plane might have crashed in the Southern Indian Ocean. Frustration at the failure to locate the craft has led some families of passengers to accuse the Malaysian governemnt of witholding information on what happened and treating relatives insensitively, charges denied by the authorities. "But we know that neither the passage of time, nor this evidence, will comfort those whose grief cannot be assuaged," Najib said, adding that his country, together with Australia and China, would determine the way forward if the plane's whereabouts remained elusive. "We remain committed to doing everything within our means to solving what is an agonizing mystery for the loved ones of those who were lost," Najib told the parliament. Australian Transport Minister Darren Chester also said that the three countries remained "hopeful" and that "finding the aircraft would give answers to the world, in particular the families of missing loved ones, about what happened." International investigators were due to release their findings later on Tuesday; global rules require annual updates in such investigations. With the second anniversary also the deadline for legal action against Malaysia Airlines, lawsuits have been filed on behalf of well over 100 next-of-kin in several countries' courts in recent days. The MH370 vanished on March 8, 2014, on its way from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing carrying 239 passengers and crew. The Australia-led search is trying to retrieve the Boeing 777's black boxes, but no crash site has been determined and the countries are trying to wrap up the search within the next few months.

The Malaysian parliament has observed one minute of silence to mark the second anniversary of the plane’s disappearance. Australia says it will continue to look for the aircraft. “We hope the relatives of the 239 people, including 50 Malaysians, will remain strong,” Pandikar Amin, speaker of the Malaysian parliament, told the audience. Prime Minister Najib Razak said that the current ... Read More »

Protesters hit streets to oppose Malaysia signing TPP

Protesters have called on the Malaysian government to reject the 12-nation trade alliance ahead of a parliamentary debate. The prime minister has defended the agreement, saying Malaysia's economy will benefit greatly. Thousands of Malaysians took to the capital Kuala Lumpur on Saturday to protest the US-led Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), calling on the government to reject the agreement ahead of a parliamentary debate next week. Many of the protesters in the nation's capital were from the Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party (PAS), which fears the country could lose control of its economy and sovereignty if it joins the 12-nation trade alliance. "This (TPP) will only help the rich people. It will not help the poor people in Malaysia and I don't see any benefits for my family and I," Mohamed Noor Ismail, a student who attended the protests, told the AFP news agency. Police said that 2,000 to 3,500 people were involved in the demonstration. In October, a total of 12 Pacific Rim nations reached an agreement to create the world's largest free trade zone, including Australia, Japan, US, Vietnam, Singapore, Peru, New Zealand, Mexico, Chile, Canada and Brunei. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak's government claims the trade agreement will greatly benefit the country's economy, adding that it cannot afford to exclude itself from a trade zone that would account for nearly 40 percent of the global economy. However, critics say the TPP will undermine Malaysia's sovereignty by allowing corporations to sue the country. They also argue that the trade deal will drastically increase the cost of medicines due to stringent intellectual property clauses. Countries involved in the TPP have two years after signing the agreement to formally ratify it at a national level before the agreement mechanisms take effect.

Protesters have called on the Malaysian government to reject the 12-nation trade alliance ahead of a parliamentary debate. The prime minister has defended the agreement, saying Malaysia’s economy will benefit greatly. Thousands of Malaysians took to the capital Kuala Lumpur on Saturday to protest the US-led Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), calling on the government to reject the agreement ahead of a ... Read More »

Former Malaysian PM calls for ‘people power’ to oust current leader

Protests against Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak have gained momentum with support from former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. Mahathir has called for Najib's resignation in connection with a financial scandal. The 90-year-old Mahathir, who was greeted by protesters in Kuala Lumpur on Sunday with enthusiastic applause, apologized to the crowd for helping Najib rise to power. At a press conference, he reiterated his support for the protests and accused Najib of misusing his position to avoid corruption charges. "The only way for the people to get back to the old system is for them to remove this prime minister," Najib's highly popular predecessor told reporters prior to attending Sunday's rally. "And to remove him, the people must show people power. The people as a whole do not want this kind of corrupt leader." Ongoing protests Tens of thousands of yellow-clad Malaysians gathered in the capital city over the weekend in support of "clean and fair" elections as well as transparency reforms. Demonstrators shut down the city center with dancing, singing, and inter-faith prayer services. Police estimated that around 35,000 people attended the rallies while the pro-democracy group Bersih asserted that over 300,000 people attended the final day of the protest. "I am here to demand transparency," said businessman Mustapha Abdul Jalil. "This country is heading for bankruptcy and we must stop Najib and topple the corrupt regime." Protestors have been calling for Najib's resignation after documents leaked by the Wall Street Journal last month indicated that nearly $700 million (626 million euros) were deposited into his personal bank accounts. Najib initially denied these accusations and fired cabinet members and the attorney general for investigating the claims. Uncertain outcome Analysts have said that the protests would likely not gather enough broad public support because they lack a strong leader and support from a Malay majority party. Most of those attending the rally were from the minority ethnic Chinese and Indian communities. However, Mahathir led the dominant political party in Malaysia, the United Malays National Organization (UMNO) for many years. The country's longest-serving leader is not only a popular public figure, but also still a significant political force. UMNO Vice-President Hishammuddin Husein said that Mahathir's appearance at the protests had "crossed over the line."

Protests against Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak have gained momentum with support from former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. Mahathir has called for Najib’s resignation in connection with a financial scandal. The 90-year-old Mahathir, who was greeted by protesters in Kuala Lumpur on Sunday with enthusiastic applause, apologized to the crowd for helping Najib rise to power. At a press conference, ... Read More »

Malaysian protesters kick off second day of anti-government rally

A crowd of protesters danced and performed aerobics on the second day of the rally in Kuala Lumpur, continuing their push against Prime Minister Najib Razak. The demonstrators accuse Razak of large-scale corruption. Thousands of protesters gathered for the second day of an anti-government rally in Kuala Lumpur on Sunday morning, including hundreds who slept on the streets of the capital. The day of the demo opened in a festive mood, with exercises, dancing, a mass at the city cathedral and interfaith prayers. "This is a watershed moment," said protester Azrul Khalib, who slept on the street with his friends. "Malaysians are united in their anger at the mismanagement of this country. We are saying loudly that there should be a change in the leadership." The protests were sparked by a financial scandal involving the head of government Najib Razak. The prime minister is suspected of transferring $700 million (620 million euros) from the state development fund 1MDB to his private bank account. Razak denies any wrongdoing and claims to be the victim of a "political conspiracy." In the wake of the scandal, Razak replaced his deputy and several ministers who publicly questioned him, as well as the attorney general who was investigating the case. 'Healthy distance' The two-day rally was organized by the pro-democracy group Bersih, which fights for electoral reform. Bersih estimates that some 200,000 turned out for the protests on Saturday, while the police estimates only 25,000. "We are hoping to have as many people as yesterday to send the message to this government," said Simon Tam, a lawyer. "They have been lying and stealing and bullying for far too long and the public won't take it anymore," The government has declared the rally illegal, blocked the organizers' website and banned the yellow attire symbolizing support for Bersih. However, there were no reports of arrests or violent clashes with the police on Saturday. "We are happy that the police have maintained a healthy distance," said Pang Chin Liu, a trader among the thousands of protesters. "We do not want any trouble, we just want to send out our message to the prime minister." The rally is set to last until midnight Sunday, ushering in Malaysia's 56th National Day on Monday. No leader Despite the political turmoil, many experts believe that the government does not view the Kuala Lumpur rallies as a serious threat. "They feel safe because it has not really affected the rural Malay segment, their bedrock support," said political analyst Ibrahim Suffian. Many of the protesters come from Chinese and Indian communities, and the movement lacks a strong central leader. However, the government critics might gain momentum from the former premier Mahathir Mohamad's appearance on the Saturday rally. The 90-year old Mahathir is still a ruling-party heavyweight, and a fierce critic of Prime Minister Razak. For many years, Mahathir led the dominant political force in Malasyia, the United Malays National Organization (UMNO).

A crowd of protesters danced and performed aerobics on the second day of the rally in Kuala Lumpur, continuing their push against Prime Minister Najib Razak. The demonstrators accuse Razak of large-scale corruption. Thousands of protesters gathered for the second day of an anti-government rally in Kuala Lumpur on Sunday morning, including hundreds who slept on the streets of the ... Read More »

New mass graves discovered near Malaysian-Thai border

Mass graves with at least 24 human bodies have been unearthed along the Thai-Malaysian border in the northern Malaysian state of Perlis. The skeletons are likely to be of human trafficking victims, said Malaysian Police. Police found the corpses on Saturday in the Bukit Wang Burma area near Malaysia's border with Thailand. The heavily forested border area is frequently used by traffickers seeking to smuggle Bangladeshis and Rohingya Muslims - a persecuted minority in Myanmar - to Southeast Asia by boat. In May, Malaysian authorities discovered over a hundred bodies in mass graves near camps run by people smugglers in the country's north. The finding came after 26 bodies were exhumed from trafficking camps in neighboring Thailand. "Following on from the operation in which we found … bodies of illegal immigrants, 24 more bodies have been found and dug up," the police said in a statement on Saturday, adding that it had sent the remains to medical experts for examination. It is not immediately clear whether the bodies are those of Rohingya Mulims. "It is believed that heavy rain has eroded the graves," Shafie Isamil, police chief of the Malaysian state of Perlis, was quoted as saying by the state news agency, Bernama. The refugee crisis in Southeast Asia has flared over the past few months following a crackdown on human traffickers by Thai authorities. In May, several abandoned boats carrying more than 1,000 people washed to shore on the Malaysian island of Langkawi, near Thailand. In reaction to increasing international pressure, Malaysia and Indonesia promised they would no longer be pushing back migrant vessels seeking to reach their shores.

Mass graves with at least 24 human bodies have been unearthed along the Thai-Malaysian border in the northern Malaysian state of Perlis. The skeletons are likely to be of human trafficking victims, said Malaysian Police. Police found the corpses on Saturday in the Bukit Wang Burma area near Malaysia’s border with Thailand. The heavily forested border area is frequently used ... Read More »

Seat cushion found on island of MH370 debris discovery

Aircraft cushions have been found on Reunion island, where debris belonging to the missing plane MH370 was discovered. Details of the new wreckage came after other debris was confirmed to be part of the Malaysian plane. Malaysia's transport minister, Liow Tiong Lai, said Thursday that a team of investigators has collected more plane debris, including aircraft seat cushions, window panes and aluminum foil, on the French island of Reunion. But the minister said he could not confirm that the items belong to Malaysia Airlines flight 370, which went missing while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March 2014 with 239 people on board. "I can only ascertain that it's plane debris," Liow told reporters, adding that there were "many items" collected by the Malaysian team on the island in the Indian Ocean. Reunion is the same island where part of a wing was discovered last week was confirmed on Thursday as belonging to MH370. Liow said the new debris has been sent "to the French authorities for verification," and that Malaysia has asked authorities in neighboring areas including Mauritius and Madagascar to comb their beaches for possible debris. Earlier on Thursday, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak confirmed in a televised statement that a piece of an aircraft wing discovered on the island was from MH370. "Today, 515 days since the plane disappeared, it is with a very heavy heart that an international team of experts have conclusively confirmed that the aircraft debris found on Reunion Island is indeed from MH370," Razak said. The discovery of the MH370 wing marked the first time evidence related to the aircraft's disappearance had emerged. Relatives' anger over lack of answers The passengers' relatives have been critical of the Malaysian government's response, with some attacking Razak's administration for its inability to provide answers. "I would like to assure all those affected by this tragedy that the government of Malaysia is committed to do everything within our means to find out the truth of what happened," the Malaysian prime minister said. However, deputy Paris prosecutor Serge Mackowiak said that there is a "very high probability" that the wing piece - a flaperon - is part of missing flight MH370, adding that examinations needed continue in order to verifiably rule the link. Malaysia Airlines issued a statement following Razak's announcement, saying that the families of passengers and crew members had been informed of the discovery.

Aircraft cushions have been found on Reunion island, where debris belonging to the missing plane MH370 was discovered. Details of the new wreckage came after other debris was confirmed to be part of the Malaysian plane. Malaysia’s transport minister, Liow Tiong Lai, said Thursday that a team of investigators has collected more plane debris, including aircraft seat cushions, window panes ... Read More »

Debris ‘very likely’ from Boeing 777, says Malaysia PM

Malaysia's prime minister has said on his blog that debris found on Reunion island is "very likely to be from a Boeing 777," the same model of the missing MH370. Malaysia has sent a team to France to investigate. The Malaysia Airline flight disappeared in March 2014 with 239 people on board. The last primary radar contact placed the aircraft over the Andaman Sea, around 370 kilometers (230 miles) northwest of the Malaysia's Penang. "Initial reports suggest that the debris is very likely to be from a Boeing 777, but we need to verify whether it is from flight MH370. At this stage it is too early to speculate," Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said. The debris discovered on Reunion island is around 5,600 kilometers (2,600 miles) away from Pengang and more than 5,500 kilometers (3,500 miles) away from the current international search area. "As soon as we have more information or any verification we will make it public. We have had many false alarms before, but for the sake of the families who have lost loved ones, and suffered much heartbreaking uncertainty, I pray that we will find out the truth so that they may have closure and peace," Razak said. Off to France Malaysia's prime minister also noted that investigators from the country would be sent to France, where the flaperon - a moving wing surface found close to the fuselage of a plane - discovered on Reunion island is expected to be transferred to. "To find out as fast as possible, the debris will be shipped by French authorities to Toulouse, site of the nearest office of the BEA, the French authority responsible for civil aviation accident investigations," Razak noted. Reunion island officials said on Thursday that the BEA was asked to coordinate a probe into the origin of the debris. "No theory is being ruled out, including that it comes from a Boeing 777," the Reunion Island prefecture said. Unidentified luggage Meanwhile, luggage was also discovered near the site of the debris. "The piece of luggage was here since yesterday but nobody really paid attention," said John Begue, a member of Reunion's clean-up association who discovered the debris. Local civil aviation authorities also took possession of the unidentified luggage. The missing flight MH370 remains one of civil aviation history's unsolved mysteries.

Malaysia’s prime minister has said on his blog that debris found on Reunion island is “very likely to be from a Boeing 777,” the same model of the missing MH370. Malaysia has sent a team to France to investigate. The Malaysia Airline flight disappeared in March 2014 with 239 people on board. The last primary radar contact placed the aircraft ... Read More »

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