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Germany’s Vice Chancellor Gabriel: US-EU trade talks ‘have failed’

Free trade negotiations between the European Union and the United States have failed, according to Germany's Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel. After three years of talks, an agreement has yet to be reached. Discussions on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) have been unsuccessful, Germany's Minister for Economic Affairs, Sigmar Gabriel, who is also the country's vice chancellor, said on Sunday. "In my opinion the negotiations with the United States have de facto failed, even though nobody is really admitting it," Gabriel told German broadcaster ZDF. "Nothing is moving," he added. If agreed upon, TTIP would create the world's largest free trade zone containing 800 million people. Three years of talks have still not led to an agreement, with negotiators facing tough criticism of the deal on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Gabriel, who also heads the Social Democrats (SPD), noted that after 14 rounds of talks, the two sides have yet to agree on even one chapter out of the 27 being discussed. One of the reasons given for the breakdown in negotiations was that "we Europeans did not want to subject ourselves to American demands," Gabriel said. CETA defense In contrast to his TTIP stance, Gabriel defended the EU's free trade agreement with Canada, called the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA.) "The debate has become very difficult in that the agreement with Canada and the one with the USA have been lumped together," Gabriel said, adding that this assumption is incorrect. He praised the Canadian agreement, saying it was fairer for both sides. Many Germans continue to harbor suspicions against the TTIP and CETA, but the Canadian-European deal is much further advanced and could be ratified in the near future. German trade unions and other organizations have called for a massive rally across German cities on September 17 to protest the two trade agreements. Supporters of the TTIP hope to lock down the outlines of an agreement before France and Germany's general elections in 2017 and before US President Barack Obama leaves office at the end of 2016.

Free trade negotiations between the European Union and the United States have failed, according to Germany’s Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel. After three years of talks, an agreement has yet to be reached. Discussions on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) have been unsuccessful, Germany’s Minister for Economic Affairs, Sigmar Gabriel, who is also the country’s vice chancellor, said on ... Read More »

Merkel confident about overcoming refugee crisis, Turkey dilemma

Despite losing support after her famous pro-refugee slogan, "We can do it," Chancellor Merkel is confident that Germany will ride the migrant crisis. The leader spoke to Germany's public broadcaster ARD. In an interview on Sunday, Chancellor Angela Merkel defended her refugee policy, saying that she had made it clear last year that it would be a big task integrating migrants coming to Germany. "We have achieved a lot since then and we need to do some more," Merkel told the presenters, referring to her famous slogan, "Wir schaffen das," German for, "We can do it." "We are at a completely different position since last year," Merkel said, adding that the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) had thousands of new employees dealing with the newcomers. The government in Berlin is supporting local administrations and state governments in overcoming the crisis. There were new and stricter rules for refugees who could not stay in Germany and migrants were being told they needed to integrate and learn German, Merkel told ARD. Merkel also addressed the distribution of migrants within Europe, saying that the European Union needed to find a common solution. "Every member must do their share," Merkel said, adding that countries could not just reject migrants because they were Muslims. The bloc also needed to work on an coherent internal security policy and the implementation of the refugee pact with Turkey, the chancellor said. Chancellor Merkel emphasized the bloc's discussions with Britain on the latter's exit from the European Union, saying that the Brexit was a break from the past and member states needed to think about a solution in peace. "We all agree in the European Union that Britain's exit, the result of the referendum, will have a big impact … Rather than rushing into acitivities, we should perhaps first take time to think about what we, as the 27 countries, must do better." Conflicts abroad Merkel also referred to her statement regarding the loyalty of Germany's Turkish citizens. "I keep saying that I'm their chancellor too and I think it's important to profess that and it's good if that is reciprocated by commitment to our country and not by bringing conflicts from Turkey to Germany," she said. Pressure has mounted among Germany's Turks following a failed coup against Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in July. His backers have demonstrated in several German cities, where supporters of the Gülen movement are believed to coexist. Fethullah Gülen, who runs a movement spanning businesses and academia, lives in exile in the US and is accused of having orchestrated the coup. The chancellor also addressed the Ukraine crisis, lamenting the fact that the Minsk Pact had not been adhered to. Sanctions against Russia would remain in place, considering the situation in eastern Ukraine, Merkel said. However, she emphasized that the bloodbath in Syria had to be stopped and that this could only be done through discussion. There was no military solution to it. Merkel evaded all questions regarding her candidacy for a fourth term as chancellor, saying she would make an announcement when the time was right. A new poll conducted by the survey company Emnid, says that half of Germans oppose the chancellor seeking another term.

Despite losing support after her famous pro-refugee slogan, “We can do it,” Chancellor Merkel is confident that Germany will ride the migrant crisis. The leader spoke to Germany’s public broadcaster ARD. In an interview on Sunday, Chancellor Angela Merkel defended her refugee policy, saying that she had made it clear last year that it would be a big task integrating ... Read More »

German government debates keeping Incirlik air base in Turkey

Berlin is in discussion with Turkey to ensure that the German military can fly its sorties supporting the US' anti-IS campaign in the Middle East. But some German lawmakers are threatening to end the mission. "I expect that missions of the anti-IS coalition will continue to be able to be flown from Incirlik," German Chancellor Angela Merkel told reporters during a visit to Prague. "Part of that, given that we have a parliamentary army, is that German lawmakers be allowed to visit Incirlik if they want to," she added. The German military, or the Bundeswehr, was expected to continue the mission from the NATO air base in Incirlik provided German lawmakers authorized these missions, the chancellor said. The controversy around the issue emerged in June this year when the Bundestag passed a resolution branding the 1915 massacre of Armenians by Ottoman forces a genocide. Consequently, Turkey banned German leaders from visiting the air base and could continue to ban another planned visit in October. Meanwhile, Social Democrats, (SPD) Merkel's partners in the ruling coalition, said they would demand the withdrawal of German soldiers and equipment from Incirlik if Turkey refused to allow parliamentarians to visit again in October. "We will only send our soldiers to countries where we can be certain that we can visit them," the SPD's defense spokesman Rainer Arnold told journalists. However, Germany's Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen said both Turkey and Germany could profit from the air base at Incirlik. When asked if the military was prepared for a rapid withdrawal, she said, "Smart military planning always looks at fallback options." A spokesman for the defense ministry also confirmed to the "Spiegel" that the government was looking at six other options to relocate the 250 German soldiers, six Tornado airplanes and a refueling plane. But such a move would interrupt the flights for at least two months, the "Spiegel" magazine reported on Thursday. Bundeswehr deployment outside Germany requires a mandate from the parliament. The current mandate for Incirlik runs out in December.

Berlin is in discussion with Turkey to ensure that the German military can fly its sorties supporting the US’ anti-IS campaign in the Middle East. But some German lawmakers are threatening to end the mission. “I expect that missions of the anti-IS coalition will continue to be able to be flown from Incirlik,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel told reporters during ... Read More »

In Estonia, Merkel and Roivas talk Russia and internet

Angela Merkel's visit to Tallinn comes at the time when Germany has taken more interest in Estonia. The two countries share a long history and are cooperating on EU, security and digital affairs. Thursday's visit to the St. Mary's Cathedral in the Estonian capital, Tallinn, gave German Chancellor Angela Merkel a chance to look back on Europe's history. On display, the cathedral has three letters Martin Luther wrote regarding the sending of preachers to Tallinn. The countries share a long history: The Baltic German nobility was in charge of Estonia for over 700 years, and German was the official language until Estonia's independence in 1918. Since Estonia regained independence from the Soviet Union 25 years ago, dialogue between the countries has increased again. As chancellor, Helmut Kohl had played a major part in convincing Russian President Boris Yeltsin to withdraw troops from Estonia in the mid-1990s. Today, almost 2,000 Germans live in Estonia. The Goethe-Institut, a nonprofit cultural association, operates a branch in Tallinn - albeit one of the smallest of its 159 outposts worldwide - to promote German language and culture. 'Some fundamental issues' Staunchly pro-EU, budget-disciplined, and oriented toward business, Estonia has become a loyal political and economic ally to Merkel's government. And the European Union is high on the agenda during Merkel's visit. "The main topic of our meeting is the future of the EU," Estonian Prime Minister Taavi Roivas told DW. "There are some fundamental issues to be clarified: where Europe is going, which values we want to hold on to and protect, and the choices to be made for the sake of a strong and functioning union." Estonian officials are looking for German military support. After Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea and subsequent military incursions into Ukraine, Estonian officials grew concerned about their eastern neighbor again. Memories of the long occupation by Soviet Russia are still relatively fresh. Security worries Although Estonia joined NATO in 2004, it wasn't until Russia's most recent aggression that the decision to commit multinational troops to the Baltic states was made. At this summer's summit in Warsaw, NATO approved the deployment of battalions to Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland. At the summit, Prime Minister Rõivas and Chancellor Merkel set a date for her visit. Germany will send up to 1,000 soldiers to Lithuania, and a Bundeswehr unit arrived in Estonia last month, where it is participating in exercises and will remain through the end of September. German special forces participated in a recent training exercise against terrorism in Estonia. Germany's air force has repeatedly taken responsibility for patrolling the skies over Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania as part of the NATO mission - the Baltic states do not have their own airborne defense capabilities. German jets will return to Estonia's Amari Air Base again this September. Estonia's digital society Apart from the security matters, Germany and Estonia have initiated digital cooperation. In May, Merkel had invited her Estonian counterpart to a German government meeting in Meseberg. At the meeting, Roivas presented a report, introducing the Estonian e-government and the nation's experience in cybersecurity. According to Siim Sikkut, a digital policy adviser with the Estonian government, the Germans were genuinely intrigued - the planned one-hour meeting stretched over two hours. The constructive interest of German cabinet members was mostly focused on how to attract more people to use digital opportunities based on Estonia's experience. Roivas is optimistic. After meeting with Merkel in Tallinn on Wednesday, he said pooling Estonia's expertise in information technology with Germany's industrial power "could give a new impetus to Europe's economies." Merkel will speak on digital cooperation between the countries and receive a briefing on how Estonia's electronic services, such as the digital signature, work in practice. On Thursday, Prime Minister Roivas will present Merkel with an e-residency card - allowing the chancellor to become a digital resident and try out Estonia's digital solutions firsthand.

Angela Merkel’s visit to Tallinn comes at the time when Germany has taken more interest in Estonia. The two countries share a long history and are cooperating on EU, security and digital affairs. Thursday’s visit to the St. Mary’s Cathedral in the Estonian capital, Tallinn, gave German Chancellor Angela Merkel a chance to look back on Europe’s history. On display, ... Read More »

Inexperienced but confident Jones takes over as coach of Germany’s women

Steffi Jones has taken over as the head coach of Germany's national women's football team. The former national-team player replaces Silvia Neid, who stepped down after winning gold in Rio. The 43-year-old Jones was officially unveiled at a press conference in Frankfurt on Wednesday. She used the platform to speak about her ambitious plans to take Germany forward following Neid's retirement after 11 years at the helm. "If we're going to do something, we'll do it right," Jones aid." And that's why we want the title at the European championship next year." The former midfielder made 111 appearances for Germany but has no previous coaching experience. She conceded that she had big shoes to fill, but said she was convinced that she was up to the task. "I know what I capable of and I would not have taken the job if I thought I couldn't have done it," she said. "For me, it's a dream job. I don't want to follow in Silvia's footsteps, but successfully continue her work with my own signature as Steffi Jones," she said. Neid's record as coach of the national team is impressive, having led Germany to victory at the 2007 women's World Cup, as well as the 2009 and 2013 European championships, before winning the gold medal at the summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro last weekend. Jones' first tests as head coach will come next month when Germany face Russia and Hungary in qualifying for next year's European championship in the Netherlands. As the daughter of a German mother and US soldier, Jones, who grew up in Frankfurt, is a citizen of both countries.

Steffi Jones has taken over as the head coach of Germany’s national women’s football team. The former national-team player replaces Silvia Neid, who stepped down after winning gold in Rio. The 43-year-old Jones was officially unveiled at a press conference in Frankfurt on Wednesday. She used the platform to speak about her ambitious plans to take Germany forward following Neid’s ... Read More »

Italian warship plays host as leaders discuss post-Brexit EU

The leaders of Italy, France and Germany have chosen an Italian aircraft carrier as the venue to discuss the EU's future. The trio will meet near Ventotene, where a 1941 manifesto was penned envisioning a federal Europe. European leaders of the three largest economies on the European continent are meeting Monday to discuss the future of the European Union in the wake of Britain's shock referendum decision to leave the EU. The choice of Ventotene - an archipelago which has housed a prison since the 18th century - is significant as it was where jailed Italian leftists Altiero Spinelli and Ernesto Rossi drew up the "Ventotene Manifesto" in 1941, calling for a future Europe of intertwined federal states as a means of preventing future wars. The manifesto was written on sheets of cigarette paper and smuggled to the mainland Ursula Hirschmann, a German anti-fascist activist, who shared it with the Italian resistance. Now 75 years later, the three European leaders will discuss the future of European federalism aboard the Italian aircraft carrier Garibaldi, anchored near the former prison island. Their shared agenda is to include the EU's response to the refugee crisis, increasing frequency of deadly attacks on civilians by apparently deranged individuals and the future of the European bloc following the UK referendum that could see its exit. The Italian economy could also be on the meeting agenda after the EU's fourth-largest economy fell into stagnation and public debt reached a record high. Italy's government has proposed creating "a Schengen-like defense agreement to respond to terrorism" with a "multinational force" under a unified command for specific missions. France has indicated it is open to the idea, though Germany is opposed to the proposed floating of eurobonds to finance it which would increase debt levels. France is also expected to push for the so-called "Juncker Plan" in which EU funding levels for infrastructure, education and research would be doubled.

The leaders of Italy, France and Germany have chosen an Italian aircraft carrier as the venue to discuss the EU’s future. The trio will meet near Ventotene, where a 1941 manifesto was penned envisioning a federal Europe. European leaders of the three largest economies on the European continent are meeting Monday to discuss the future of the European Union in ... Read More »

Report: Germany to require citizens to stockpile supplies in case of catastrophe

A civil defense plan to be debated by the cabinet would require citizens to stockpile supplies in case of a catastrophe. The plan says people should prepare for an unlikely event that "could threaten our existence." For the first time since the end of the Cold War, the German government plans to encourage its citizens to prepare for a catastrophe or armed attack by stockpiling food, water and other supplies, the "Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung" reported on Sunday. Citing the government's "Concept for Civil Defense" paper to be discussed by the cabinet on Wednesday, the government will require people to stock 10 days worth of food and five days of worth of drinking water. The civil defense strategy would require citizens to have a sufficient supply of food, water, energy, money and medicine to wait out a period until the state would be able to initiate a response to a catastrophe or attack. A spokesperson from the interior ministry declined to comment on the contents of the paper until a Wednesday press conference. The 69-page report said an armed attack on Germany was unlikely. However, as a precaution people should "prepare appropriately for a development that could threaten our existence and cannot be categorically ruled out in the future," FAS quoted the report as saying. The civil defense strategy was originally commission by a parliamentary committee in 2012, but its release comes amid a raft of new security measures in the country.

A civil defense plan to be debated by the cabinet would require citizens to stockpile supplies in case of a catastrophe. The plan says people should prepare for an unlikely event that “could threaten our existence.” For the first time since the end of the Cold War, the German government plans to encourage its citizens to prepare for a catastrophe ... Read More »

Germany toughens Swiss border against illegal migrants

Germany has deployed an additional 130 border staff to stop illegal immigrants at the Swiss border. As more migrants arrive in Italy, Switzerland has become a new transit route for migrants trying to reach Germany. Switzerland is becoming a new transit route for migrants trying to enter Germany, Swiss media reported on Sunday, a development that has prompted Germany to beef up border security. Swiss Finance Minister Ueli Maurer, who also manages border police, said Germany had assigned roughly 90 additional border guards and 40 police officers to the border to prevent illegal migrants from entering the country. "Germany is consistently securing the border to Switzerland," Maurer told a congress of the right-wing Swiss People's Party (SVP) over the weekend, the "Neue Zürcher Zeitung am Sonntag" reported him as saying. He used the tougher German response to justify his country sending back to Italy nearly 1,000 migrants a day. "Germany has clearly moved away from its welcoming attitude," he said. Switzerland still accepts people seeking asylum in the country, but sends back those with no rights to asylum or who only want to travel to countries further north. The German interior ministry in Berlin confirmed the extra border forces, saying they were deployed to detain or expel people who illegally enter the country or do not seek asylum. A spokesperson from the ministry said the border was reinforced in response to the still significant number of migrants crossing the Mediterranean to Italy. Germany took in nearly a million migrants fleeing war and poverty in Middle East and Africa last year. Most arrived from Austria after transiting through the Balkan route before it was largely closed earlier this year. With the closure of the Balkan route, Italy has become the new center of migrant arrivals in Europe. According to the EU border agency Frontex, from the beginning of the year to July some 95,000 migrants have arrived in Italy, a 12 percent increase from last year. NZZ cited German federal police in Berlin saying 3,385 illegal immigrants from Switzerland have been caught this year, up 40 percent from the same period last year.

Germany has deployed an additional 130 border staff to stop illegal immigrants at the Swiss border. As more migrants arrive in Italy, Switzerland has become a new transit route for migrants trying to reach Germany. Switzerland is becoming a new transit route for migrants trying to enter Germany, Swiss media reported on Sunday, a development that has prompted Germany to ... Read More »

Report: Number of neo-Nazi rock concerts on the rise in Germany

The first half of 2016 has already seen some 98 far-right musical events in Germany, with some concerts drawing thousands of fans, reported "Die Welt." Authorities have warned that such events serve as recruitment tools. Right-wing rock concerts, far-right party meetings with musical acts, and so-called "Liederabende" (song recitals) are on the rise across Germany, "Die Welt" newspaper reported on Saturday. Already in the first six months of 2016, a total of 98 such events have taken place, the newspaper said, citing an Interior Ministry response to an information request from the Left Party. Of that total, around 40 were rock concerts and 49 "Liederabende" - where right-wing extremist singers and songwriters perform to small audiences. 'Safe haven' for the far-right scene Although the events take place all over Germany, the central state of Thuringia was the uncomfortable home to 14 events so far this year, according to data from the Interior Ministry. In fact, a right-wing music festival called "Rock gegen Überfremdung" - which roughly translates to "Rock against foreign infiltration" - is set to take place in the small Thuringia village of Kirchheim on Saturday. The migrant crisis-themed rock festival is expected to draw around 800 neo-Nazis - more than the number of inhabitants in Kirchheim, reported "Die Welt." "There is a risk that Thuringia will become a safe haven for all types of extremists, since they must feel les exposed to persecution here," Thuringia state parliament member Andreas Bühl told the newspaper. He criticized a lack of security personnel for the rise in right-wing extremism in the state. A troubling trend Compared to the first half of 2015, the number of right-wing musical events has risen sharply in the first half of this year. Between January and June in 2015, a total of 63 right-wing musical events took place. With this year's figures already up to 98 total events, 2016 is possibly on track to surpass last year's record. The number of right-wing extremist musical events taking place in Germany has hit a four-year high, reported Germany's domestic intelligence agency (BfV). Last year, the agency clocked 199 total musical events. However, 2016 has already surpassed last year's records. In May of this year, the largest far-right musical event in recent years took place in the Thuringian town of Hildburghausen, reported the BfV on their website. Around 3,500 visitors from Germany and some neighboring European countries traveled to the festival "Rock for Identity - Music and Speeches Against the Abolition of Germany." In comparison, the largest right-wing rock concert last year drew 650 visitors. Rock concerts as 'gateway drug' The data on right-wing musical activities goes back years, which begs the question - why keep tabs on right-wing musical activities? In its government information request, the Left Party cited "numerous studies" which prove the importance of music to right-wing extremists. They said right-wing rock music and concerts served as a "gateway drug" for newcomers and especially teenagers. The Left is not alone. On their website, the BfV says the "right-wing extremist music scene" has been under strict surveillance since the 1990s. Recent crime statistics released by the BfV show a spike in far-right violence in Germany last year, as well. The agency also noted the importance of musical events for establishing first contacts with possible new recruits and for maintaining party relationships. According to the BfV, live concerts for right-wing extremists are "a means of self-expression," a place of belonging. They are spaces to communicate not only about values, but enemies as well.

The first half of 2016 has already seen some 98 far-right musical events in Germany, with some concerts drawing thousands of fans, reported “Die Welt.” Authorities have warned that such events serve as recruitment tools. Right-wing rock concerts, far-right party meetings with musical acts, and so-called “Liederabende” (song recitals) are on the rise across Germany, “Die Welt” newspaper reported on ... Read More »

Call-to-arms by German populist right AfD

مہاجرین اور مسلم مخالف جرمن سیاسی جماعت الٹرنیٹیو فار جرمنی کی جانب سے کہا گیا ہے کہ گزشتہ ماہ ہونے والے حملوں کے بعد جرمن شہریوں کو ذاتی دفاع کے لیے ہتھیار رکھنے کا ’حق‘ دے دینا چاہیے۔ مہاجرین کی جرمنی آمد کی سخت ترین مخالف اس جماعت کی مقبولیت میں حالیہ کچھ ماہ میں غیرمعمولی اضافہ دیکھا گیا ہے۔ مبصرین کے مطابق یورپ میں مہاجرین کے شدید بحران کو یہ جماعت اپنی مقبولیت میں اضافے کے لیے استعمال کر رہی ہے اور اسی وجہ سے اس نے مسلمانوں اور مہاجرین کے حوالے سے اپنے موقف میں شدت پیدا کی ہے۔ اس وجہ سے اب یہ جماعت جرمنی کی کُل 16 وفاقی ریاستوں میں سے آٹھ کی اسمبلیوں میں نشستوں کی حامل ہو چکی ہے۔ گزشتہ ماہ شدت پسند تنظیم ’اسلامک اسٹیٹ‘ سے وابستہ اور تارکین وطن کے طور پر جرمنی آنے والے دو عسکریت پسندوں کی جانب سے دہشت گردانہ حملوں کے بعد کہا جا رہا ہے کہ یہ جماعت اگلے ماہ برلن اور میکلن برگ بالائی پومیرانیا کے صوبوں میں ہونے والے ریاستی انتخابات میں ماضی کے مقابلے میں کہیں زیادہ نشستیں جیت سکتی ہے۔ اے ایف ڈی یا ’متبادل برائے جرمنی‘ کی خاتون سربراہ فراؤکے پیٹری نے ہفتہ بیس اگست کے روز شائع ہونے والے اپنے ایک انٹرویو میں کہا، ’’خود کو غیرمحفوظ سمجھنے والے جرمن شہریوں کی تعداد میں مسلسل اضافہ ہو رہا ہے۔ قانون پر عمل کرنے والے ہر شہری کو یہ حق ہونا چاہیے کہ وہ اپنی، اپنے اہل خانہ اور دوستوں کی حفاظت کر سکے۔‘‘ پیٹری کا مزید کہنا تھا، ’’ہم سب جانتے ہیں کہ جائے واقعہ تک پولیس کے پہنچنے میں کتنا وقت لگ جاتا ہے، خصوصاﹰ جہاں آبادی زیادہ ہو۔‘‘ اپنے سخت اور متنازعہ بیانات کی وجہ سے اپنے حامیوں میں مقبول پیٹری نے اس سے قبل مطالبہ کیا تھا کہ جرمن پولیس کو ملک میں موجود غیرقانونی تارکین وطن کے خلاف آتشیں اسلحے کے استعمال کی اجازت دی جانا چاہیے۔ پیٹری نے اسلحے کے حوالے سے پہلے سے موجود جرمن قوانین کو مزید سخت بنانے کی مخالف کرتے ہوئے کہا کہ اس سے نقصان ذمہ دار شہریوں کو ہو گا اور وہ لوگ فائدے میں رہیں گے، جو غیرقانونی طریقے سے اسلحہ حاصل کر لیتے ہیں۔ واضح رہے کہ اسلحے کے حوالے سے جرمنی یورپ کے سخت ترین قوانین کے حامل ممالک میں سے ایک ہے۔ جرمنی میں ہتھیاروں کے قانون کے مطابق کسی بھی اسلحے کے لیے لائسنس حاصل کرنا لازم ہے، جب کہ لائسنس کے لیے ضروری ہے کہ کوئی بھی شہری 18 برس کا ہو اور اس کے پاس اسلحہ رکھنے کی کوئی مضبوط وجہ بھی ہو۔ اس سے قبل اسلحے کا لائسنس عموماﹰ شکار یا شوٹنگ مقابلوں میں حصہ لینے والے کھلاڑیوں ہی کو ملتا رہا ہے۔ یہ الگ بات ہے کہ رواں برس کے آغاز پر کولون میں خواتین پر ہونے والے جنسی حملوں کے بعد جرمن عوام میں عدم تحفظ کا احساس بڑھا ہے اور اسی وجہ سے ماضی کے مقابلے میں کہیں زیادہ افراد نے اسلحے کے لائسنسوں کے لیے درخواستیں دی ہیں۔ بتایا گیا ہے کہ ’چھوٹے آتشیں ہتھیاروں‘ کے لائسنسوں کے لیے دی جانے والی درخواستوں میں 49 فیصد اضافہ دیکھا گیا ہے۔

Populist right wing AfD party co-leader Fraucke Petry has encouraged Germans to carry firearms. She claims government has lost its state monopoly to protect the public, especially in thinly populated areas. Petry, who caused an uproar January by suggesting German police could use firearms to deter incoming refugees, on Saturday called into question Germany’s policing and stringent gun ownership law ... Read More »

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