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No end of refugee crisis in sight, says head of OECD’S migration division

With no end of the refugee crisis on the horizon, a coordinated international response is needed. Jean-Christophe Dumont, the head of OECD’s migration division, says even the EU’s largest country can't solve it alone. DW: What is your key take-away from the OECD's new migration report? Jean-Christophe Dumont: We see an increase in international migration to the OECD in 2014 by about six percent. That is a total of 4.3 million new permanent migrants to the OECD. This was only marginally impacted by the current crisis in Europe as it takes time to process the refugees. As a consequence, in the 2014 numbers, few of the current refugees are included. What is interesting is that most of the growth is actually driven by Germany. And within Germany most of that growth is driven by intra-EU mobility which is gaining quite a bit of importance. According to your report the EU is now receiving as many permanent migrants from outside the EU as the United States did from all countries. While the US has always considered itself an immigration country, the EU has no such history. How is the EU prepared for this new role? Clearly the EU has received a lot of immigrants in the past, but it was not built up by migration like the US. The US is a big country so it receives about 1 million permanent new immigrants every year. The EU is prepared to some extent. The EU has a very active integration program, but it is still facing very difficult labor market conditions in many countries. That obviously makes the integration more difficult. That is not true for Germany which is the most dynamic economy in the EU and which receives the bulk of immigration. About half a million permanent new immigrants settled in Germany in 2014. How do you expect the migration trend for Germany to continue? I think that some of the migration growth for Germany was driven by demographic changes, the very good economic conditions, and labor shortages in some skilled and semi-skilled occupations. That will probably remain. And the influx of people who will be accepted as refugees by Germany, which could be as high as 200,000 to 300,000 next year, will come on top of that. This will be a big challenge, because integrating refugees is more difficult than integrating labor migrants. It costs and it takes time, but at the end of the day as the German population is aging very rapidly these people will also contribute to the German economy. You argue that a global migration strategy is needed to cope not only with the current emergency situation, but also with future migration. With the diverging reaction to the current crisis even within the EU, how realistic is a global migration policy? We talk about a global policy mostly in response to the current crisis. It is true that no country on its own can solve this crisis - not even Germany, the biggest and most dynamic EU country, can face that on its own. Maybe even Europe on its own cannot even address this crisis. So it is necessary that with this large influx of people who are looking for shelter in Europe there is a coordinated and global response at the EU level and even beyond. But you are right there can even be cooperation in other migration policy areas, for example recognition of foreign qualification. That's an area where countries can work together to share their pains on integration issues as well and build common standards in terms of recognition of qualifications. But obviously you have to take into the account the singularity and specifics of each country as migration is still very much linked to geographical, historical and economic factors. That means that there is no one-size-fits-all response. But more cooperation at an international level can help addressing some of the big challenges and big opportunities that migration can bring. Your report describes the current refugee crisis as unprecedented. Should we then expect refugee levels to the Europe drop again after its current peak? We estimate around 1 million asylum seekers in 2015. This crisis is unprecedented. Europe can expect between 400,000 and 450,000 refugees this year. These are numbers we have not seen in the recent past. One of the characteristics of this crisis which makes it so difficult to address is not only the fact that it is a historic event, but that we don't necessarily see the end of this process. Nobody knows when the situation in Libya will be stabilized or when we will have peace in Syria. That's why it is very difficult to see the end of this crisis. That makes dealing with it so much more complicated and also creates the need for an urgent and structural response by the EU countries and beyond. Jean-Christophe Dumont heads the International Migration Division at the OECD. The interview was conducted by Michael Knigge.

With no end of the refugee crisis on the horizon, a coordinated international response is needed. Jean-Christophe Dumont, the head of OECD’s migration division, says even the EU’s largest country can’t solve it alone. DW: What is your key take-away from the OECD’s new migration report? Jean-Christophe Dumont: We see an increase in international migration to the OECD in 2014 ... Read More »

Merkel’s spokesman: ‘Closing borders to migrants not sustainable’

Germany has slammed Hungary for closing borders to refugees, saying it does not provide a sustainable solution. Meanwhile, Croatia said it can't accommodate more migrants, sending them back to the Hungarian border. Steffen Seibert, German Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman, said on Friday that his country was "aware of the great challenges" faced by countries like Greece, Macedonia, Serbia, Hungary and Croatia that provide a transit route to immigrants from the Middle East. "At the same time repelling refugees at the borders, in the view of the German government, does not contribute to a sustainable solution to the current refugee problem," he said. "This humanitarian challenge, probably Europe's greatest since the World War II, there are no purely national solutions, but only a solution in which Europe as a whole gets together and constructively and collectively addresses the problem," Seibert added. Thousands of people are fleeing a civil war in Syria and heading to Europe via the Mediterranean. The arrival of these refugees has sparked major upheaval in Europe, with many governments imposing strict border checks to impede and manage the overflow of migrants. Germany and other European countries have pledged to take thousands of asylum-seekers as a gesture of solidarity. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban said on Friday that a new fence was already being built on the Croatian border to stem the migrant pressure. Croatia has closed its border with Serbia after being deluged with refugees since Hungary closed its doors. Limited capacity Meanwhile, Croatia said it had no capacity to accommodate the influx of migrants heading towards Western Europe. The country's authorities shifted hundreds of refugees to the Hungarian border on Friday. Some 20 buses took the migrants to Beremend on the Croatian side of the border escorted by the police and soldiers. Earlier on Friday, Prime Minister Zoran Milanovic justified his cabinet's decision to close seven border crossings with Serbia. On Thursday, Croatia shut seven of eight road border crossings with Serbia after more than 11,000 refugees overwhelmed the frontier over the past two days. Serbian officials protested the move, fearing that the closure would leave thousands of migrants stranded inside its own territory. "Our capacities are small. Though Croatia is for all those people a transit country, we cannot take in any more," Milanovic told a press conference.

Germany has slammed Hungary for closing borders to refugees, saying it does not provide a sustainable solution. Meanwhile, Croatia said it can’t accommodate more migrants, sending them back to the Hungarian border. Steffen Seibert, German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman, said on Friday that his country was “aware of the great challenges” faced by countries like Greece, Macedonia, Serbia, Hungary and ... Read More »

German employment agency boss Weise named new migration head

Frank-Jürgen Weise will take the reins of Germany's migration office. Weise, who also leads the country's employment agency and will carry out both jobs at once, is replacing Manfred Schmidt, who resigned this week. Germany's Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere announced Frank-Jürgen Weise's appointment as the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) on Thursday, on top of his work at the Federal Employment Agency. The appointment was finalized around a week ago after the Chancellery met with Weise and Manfred Schmidt, the former head of BAMF who resigned on Thursday citing personal reasons. Weise would also lead a joint working group involving both the country's employment and migration agencies, which would look into speedy processing of asylum applications, Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman Steffen Seibert said in a statement. The new task force would develop ideas to accelerate the process through which refugees applied for asylum and would be assisted by personnel from the employment agency and the migration office. Seibert said the two federal authorities were already working closely with one another. Both the Bundestag and the upper house of the German parliament, the Bundesrat, had agreed to the working group and Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere would present a report by its members in a refugee summit of German states with Berlin next week, the ministry said in a statement. BAMF under fire The BAMF has been attracting criticism because of delays in processing asylum applications, especially as thousands of migrants were making their way to Germany in the last weeks. European figures released on Friday showed that Germany had the highest number of unprocessed asylum applications - both in gross terms and as a percentage of the total - of any EU member. The federal government and the states had also raised concerns about the migration office's handling of the current refugee crisis. The organization was also blamed for posting a tweet in August, which could have led to the increased influx of migrants into Germany. At the time, BAMF had decided that "in practice," it would not send back Syrian refugees who wanted to come to Germany but had been registered under the Dublin asylum regulations. The Dbulin rules state that refugees must be sent back to their first point of entry in the EU. Many migrants thought this meant they could seek refuge in Berlin without any fear of being deported, leading to a massive movement of people from across Eastern Europe towards German territory.

Frank-Jürgen Weise will take the reins of Germany’s migration office. Weise, who also leads the country’s employment agency and will carry out both jobs at once, is replacing Manfred Schmidt, who resigned this week. Germany’s Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere announced Frank-Jürgen Weise’s appointment as the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) on Thursday, on top of his work ... Read More »

Hungary fires tear gas, water cannons to hold back refugees

Police in Hungary's Roszke border crossing have fired tear gas and water cannons to scatter asylum seekers wanting to cross over from Serbia. Budapest has closed down its borders to keep new arrivals out. Hundreds of riot police tried to repel migrants trying to break through a razor-wire fence from Serbia into Hungary on Wednesday. Budapest had meanwhile informed Serbia of temporarily closing the Roszke-Horgos border crossing for 30 days, Serbia's foreign ministry said in a statement. Roszke-Horgos is one of the main crossings between Serbia and Hungary, a member of the European Union and a signatory of the Schengen agreement, which allows for free movement without border checks. Hungary locked down the border on Tuesday to prevent people from crossing illegally. "The crowd on the Serbian side became aggressive and threw stones, bottles and sticks at police on the Hungarian side and crossed the barrier at the border," a police statement said. "The police is protecting the border of Hungary and the EU while respecting the law and the principle of proportionality," the statement added. There were also reports of helicopters flying overhead. However, a United Nations official at the scene, quoted by Reuters news agency, said it did not appear that the refugees had breached the barrier. Illegal immigrants arrested Budapest's police officers said they had arrested 519 refugees who tried to cross the border since the government enforced its new law that made it a crime to cross from Serbia anywhere other than at legal checkpoints. Forty-six criminal cases were registered and a man from Iraq was the first person found to be guilty of breaking the new law. The man was to be expelled from Hungary and would likely be sent back to Serbia. Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto denied that Hungary was being callous by closing borders, saying his country was "always in solidarity with the refugees" but that it "cannot accept economic migrants because we cannot bear the burden of that." Hungary has become the main point of entry into the European Union for people fleeing war and poverty in the Middle East and Africa. More than 200,000 have entered the country this year. Many migrants are still trapped in Horgos and several are now trying to get into the EU via Croatia and make their way to Germany or other wealthy countries in Western Europe. Chancellor Angela Merkel's government has said Berlin was expecting applications from around 800,000 refugees this year.

Police in Hungary’s Roszke border crossing have fired tear gas and water cannons to scatter asylum seekers wanting to cross over from Serbia. Budapest has closed down its borders to keep new arrivals out. Hundreds of riot police tried to repel migrants trying to break through a razor-wire fence from Serbia into Hungary on Wednesday. Budapest had meanwhile informed Serbia ... Read More »

Bus breaks down on German rail crossing, driver saves some 60 children

Sixty pupils have escaped a bus-versus-train nightmare in Germany with only seconds to spare. All of them got off after quick thinking by the bus driver. Police put the vehicle damage at 300,000 euros. A bus driver's quick thinking, rushing dozens of children off the vehicle after it stopped on a level crossing, averted a tragedy in northern Germany on Wednesday. Shortly after the bus broke down, a commuter train slammed into it on the crossing, as shaken pupils watched. After bringing the children and herself to safety, the driver had also tried to alert rail staff by phone, but could not prevent the collision. The crossing at Buxtehude southwest of Hamburg was reopened late on Wednesday afternoon after repairs. 'A train is coming!' One pupil, 15-year-old Marvin, said that one of the young occupants had called out: "Oh god, a train is coming!" Then the barrier went down to stop other vehicles from crossing. The 23-year-old driver urged everyone to leave the bus. "The lady prevented the worst from happening through her quick action," said police spokesman Rainer Bohmbach. Sixty seconds later the train, a double-decker operated by the firm Metronom and en route from Hamburg to Cuxhaven, rammed into the rear of the hurriedly vacated two-segment "bendy" bus. Bus' connecting joint jammed "Everyone screamed, all had shaking legs," said Marvin who also filmed the collision using his mobile phone from the safetly of an adjacent road. Police said emergency braking activated by the train driver failed to avert collision. An initial check indicated that the bus' connecting joint had jammed as the vehicle turned hard right at the crossing, because of a road works diversion notice. Then, its motor failed to restart. Linkage via parent firm Metronom, a private rail operator in Germany's northern state of Lower Saxony, transports some 95,000 passengers each day. The bus' operator, KVG, is based in the same state's city of Stade. Both firms are subsidiaries of the the Berlin-based parent concern Netinera, whose investors are based in Italy and Luxembourg. It is a rival of the much larger state-owned concern German Rail, otherwise known as Deutsche Bahn, which moves more than six million passngers each day.

Sixty pupils have escaped a bus-versus-train nightmare in Germany with only seconds to spare. All of them got off after quick thinking by the bus driver. Police put the vehicle damage at 300,000 euros. A bus driver’s quick thinking, rushing dozens of children off the vehicle after it stopped on a level crossing, averted a tragedy in northern Germany on ... Read More »

What Donald Trump learned from his German grandpa Friedrich Drumpf

Want to understand the phenomenon called Donald Trump and his surprising rise to the top of the Republican presidential field? Then you’d better check out his German roots, Trump biographer Gwenda Blair tells DW. DW: Why do you think that Donald Trump's German roots are essential to understanding the person who is currently leading the Republican presidential field? Gwenda Blair: His grandfather Friedrich Drumpf came to the United States in 1885 which was the height of German immigration to the United States when he was 16. His family was from Kallstadt, winegrowers. The first step to the Donald Trump we know today is that his grandfather did not want to be a vintner, nor did he want to be a barber which is what he was trained to do when he first said he did not want to be involved in growing grapes. He came to New York and, after he learnt English, he went to the West Coast, ran restaurants, amassed a nest egg, then went back to Kallstadt, married the girl next door and brought her to New York. But she was extremely homesick, so they went back to Kallstadt and he tried to repatriate because he had become an American citizen. But whether on purpose or not, he had managed to miss military service - when he left he was too young and after he came back he was just a couple of months too old, which he said was absolutely coincidental. German authorities however thought this was not coincidental at all and refused to let him repatriate. They said he was a draft-dodger, expelled and deported him to the place he came from - the United States - which is how the Trumps ended up as Americans after all instead of simply being a family in Germany that had a grandfather who had spent some years in the United States. What traits of his grandfather and father do you think are also reflected in Donald Trump and the way he conducts his business and political career? They are really an impressive through line of people who would do anything to get ahead and win. They are all enormously tenacious, never give up and are willing to push the envelope to bend the rules and find the loopholes. Grandpa Trump built his restaurants on land that he did not own. In that time of the Gold Rush in the Klondike, it was the Wild West period. It was wide open, very raw, lots of single men desperately trying to find gold - and prostitutes. And Grandpa Trump's restaurants had liquor, food and access to women. His restaurants had little cubicles off to the sides with heavy curtains - so called private rooms for ladies - which was absolutely understood to mean prostitutes. His establishment was not the exception there, but he certainly did well by that. And after that he went back to Germany and claimed that he was quiet man who avoided bars in his petition to repatriate. His son Fred, who made his money in real estate in the outer boroughs of New York City, was very good at finding loopholes. When he was building state-financed housing he set up shell equipment companies and then rented bulldozers and trucks from himself at very high and inflated prices. It was not illegal, but he was pushing the edge and bending the rules. He was very good at that. Donald in turn has been very good at finding loopholes and bending rules when he built Trump Towers for example. He hired undocumented Polish workers to do the demolition of the building that had been there before, paid them very low wages and had them sleep on the building site, because they were on such a rushed schedule. Later on he said he had not noticed that they were undocumented which he could not have missed. He is very good at that. With his own family's immigration experience how do you explain Trump's anti-immigrant stance and his vitriolic rhetoric against immigrants? He has been very good a figuring out who his audience is. I am not sure we can call that a German trait, but it is certainly part of his family culture of looking to who the audience is. His grandfather looked to who the audience was when he had those restaurants in the Klondike. His father looked to who the audience was when he built his housing in the outer boroughs of New York which was nothing like what we associate with Donald Trump today. It was middle income housing, but he added a little extra touch that his would-be customers appreciated like an extra closet. He was very good at marketing. And Donald in turn has been very good at marketing to what he decided is his audience. In this case, the upcoming election, that is the big mass of alienated, unhappy and angry Americans who feel "our country used to be great and it's not anymore and it's somebody else's fault." They want somebody to make it right and get them the respect and the prosperity they think they deserve. And Trump has been very skillful at seeing this mass of angry people and positioning himself as their champion and making it clear to them that he is going to go against anything that is in their way - no matter whether it is immigrants, a famous Republican war hero like John McCain, a woman like Fox host Megan Kelly or a hedge fund manager. So going after immigrants is an easy target to pick off when he is trying to appeal to this mass of mostly white voters in the United States who feel like they have been left behind. So it does not bother him that he is in a way betraying his own family history with his stance on immigration? I don't think contradictions have ever bothered him, which has been confounding obviously to people observing the primary race. He is all over the map politically and I don't think it matters to him. He used to be a Democrat, but now he'll be a Republican. Now he is conservative, but he used to be liberal. He used to be for the right for an abortion, now he is hedging back on that. He used to be for immigration reform, now he is against. He moves back and forth very fluidly. I think that is the least bit of concern. Gwenda Blair is the author of "Trumps: Three Generations That Built an Empire" and "Donald Trump: Master Apprentice". She teaches journalism at Columbia University. The interview was conducted by Michael Knigge.

Want to understand the phenomenon called Donald Trump and his surprising rise to the top of the Republican presidential field? Then you’d better check out his German roots, Trump biographer Gwenda Blair tells DW. DW: Why do you think that Donald Trump’s German roots are essential to understanding the person who is currently leading the Republican presidential field? Gwenda Blair: ... Read More »

Mats Hummels: “Sometimes a bit kick-and-rush”

After Germany's narrow 3-2 win against Scotland in Glasgow, DW's Ross Dunbar caught up with defender Mats Hummels to talk about the team's performance and the form of one of his BVB teammates. Wins over Poland and Scotland have reinvigorated Joachim Löw's national team and have highlighted their credentials ahead of the European Championships next summer. Germany leads Group D, two points ahead of Poland and four ahead of the Republic of Ireland. With two games left in Ireland and against Georgia, Löw's side is almost certainly heading to France next summer. However, the rest of the group remains as enthralling as ever. Ireland and Scotland are vying not to be the left out nation from the British Isles – England has qualified, Wales and Northern Ireland expect to follow soon. Even though Germany needs just a point in Ireland, defender Mats Hummels says taking their foot off the gas in Dublin when the heat will be on the home side is not an option. “Of course that's what we won't do,” Hummels told DW.com and other reporters in Glasgow. “Our start after the World Cup wasn't so good. We had a draw against Ireland at home so we know we have to improve for going to the Euros next summer. We're in a good position and beat a strong opponent today who played as we expected.” Probably one of the best in the world Hummels played the full 90 minutes in Glasgow against Gordon Strachan's men who managed to claw their way back into the game on two occasions, firstly through an own goal from the central defender. The test in Glasgow was certainly more physical than against Poland on Friday. Germany came out 3-2 winners on the night courtesy of two strikes from Thomas Müller and one from Ilkay Gündogan. “It was sometimes a bit kick-and-rush, but that's one way to play this game. We had a great test here,” Hummels added. Germany's visit to Ireland will offer similar tests as Hummels feels the side is entering their preparation period for the Championships. “You can't force the preparation, but you can nudge it forward a bit,” he added. “You need to get the right atmosphere in the training, a mixture of being focused and having fun.” Meanwhile, Hummels' Dortmund teammate, Gündogan, turned in a man-of-the-match performance against Scotland, rewarding the faith of head coach Löw who declared that he was back to his best in the lead-up to the match. If the performances against Poland and Scotland didn't reaffirm his position in Germany's midfield, the confidence of his fellow players will. “I think he is absolutely back to his best,” Hummels said. “I think when he is at his best he isn't just one of the best midfielders in Germany, but in probably world football. We're very lucky to have him in Dortmund and at the national team, so hopefully that continues.”

After Germany’s narrow 3-2 win against Scotland in Glasgow, DW’s Ross Dunbar caught up with defender Mats Hummels to talk about the team’s performance and the form of one of his BVB teammates. Wins over Poland and Scotland have reinvigorated Joachim Löw’s national team and have highlighted their credentials ahead of the European Championships next summer. Germany leads Group D, ... Read More »

Lufthansa pilots strike again, more walkouts threatened

Shortly after the latest work stoppage by Lufthansa pilots began, the union representing them threatened further strikes. The union and management are at loggerheads over cost-cutting plans. A spokesman for Vereinigung Cockpit (VC), the union that represents the pilots at Germany's flag carrier airline, said on Tuesday that they could soon call more strikes in addition to the walkout affecting long-haul routes, which began at 0600 UTC, and the strike of short- and medium-haul flights, set to start on Wednesday. "We cannot rule out further strikes this week," VC spokesman Markus Wahl told reporters at Frankfurt Airport, Lufthansa's main hub on Tuesday. "Strikes are possible in the following weeks as well," he added. Tuesday's strike - which is to run until just before midnight local time (2159 UTC) -has forced Lufthansa to cancel a total of 84 flights, affecting around 20,000 passengers. That's almost half of the airline's regularly scheduled long-haul flights. Ninety long-haul flights from Frankfurt, Munich and Düsseldorf were expected to go ahead as scheduled. Despite the disruption the situation appeared to be calm at the affected airports, with few passengers turning up for cancelled flights as the airline had earlier warned them ahead of time, using text messaging and email. Extra service staff was also on hand to assist the few who did turn up for cancelled flights. Both Lufthansa and the airline's passengers have grown accustomed to such disruptions, as this is the 13th time that the pilots have walked off the job within the space of a year and a half - and there is no indication that Tuesday's or even Wednesday's will be the last. "We are determined," an unnamed Lufthansa spokeswoman told the Reuters news agency, adding that there was no obvious solution to the labor conflict. "Cockpit is on the wrong path," she added. Despite several rounds of negotiations, the union and management have been unable to resolve their long-running dispute over early retirement provisions. The air carrier wants to cut costs by doing away with so-called 'transition contracts' handed to pilots who stop flying before the legal age of retirement. These allow pilots to retire as early as age 55 while receiving up to 60 percent of their salary until they reach retirement age. Added to this dispute is Lufthansa management's plan to expand the operations of its low price unit Eurowings. It is incorporated in Austria, where German labor agreements reached in collective bargaining do not apply. Tuesday's walkout was the first since just before the crash of a jet operated by Lufthansa subsidiary Germanwings in March.

Shortly after the latest work stoppage by Lufthansa pilots began, the union representing them threatened further strikes. The union and management are at loggerheads over cost-cutting plans. A spokesman for Vereinigung Cockpit (VC), the union that represents the pilots at Germany’s flag carrier airline, said on Tuesday that they could soon call more strikes in addition to the walkout affecting ... Read More »

Refugee crisis ‘to cost Germany 10 billion euros’

The cost of care for refugees could reach around 10 billion euros ($11 billion) in 2015. Amid internal criticism over Chancellor Angela Merkel's decisions, the CDU and SPD are due to discuss the distribution of costs. According to a report in the Sunday edition of German newspaper, the "Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung" (FAS), financial costs for Germany could reach anywhere between 9 and 10.5 billion euros by the end of the year. The figure is based on cost estimates from local governments around the country. A refugee summit held by the German parliament in July budgeted 5.6 billion euros for an expected 450,000 asylum applications this year. In light of the recent mass influx of refugees from Africa and the Middle East, however, Germany is now expecting to take in some 800,000 by the end of December. According to Germany's Federal Statistics Office, 2.4 billion euros were spent on caring for some 203,000 new asylum seekers last year. At municipal level, the current annual cost per refugee stands at between 12,000 and 13,000 euros, which covers accommodation, meals, pocket money, health costs and administrative expenses. Although not all asylum seekers will stay in Germany for the whole year, FAS reported that further costs of around half a billion euros must also be taken into account for the expense of additional teaching positions, and administrative roles at the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF). Talks are also underway to increase Germany's police force. CSU criticizes Merkel's handling of crisis The report on Sunday came as Germany's grand coalition prepared to meet later that day to discuss the distribution of costs. Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel, of the Social Democratic Party, last week proposed that the government should provide 3 billion euros towards accommodation costs for refugees. But there are already ructions within Angela Merkel's conservative side of the coalition over her handling of the refugee crisis. In a telephone conference late on Saturday, the Bavarian sister party to her Christian Democratic Union, the Christian Social Union, reportedly criticized Merkel for taking in more refugees who were stranded in Hungary this week. CSU General Secretary Andreas Scheuer deemed the move as the "wrong decision." Several other conservatives also warned of a "suction effect," German tabloid "Bild" reported. Thousands arrive in Munich The criticism over the weekend came as Germany welcomed 6,000 refugees at Munich train station on Saturday evening. Most of the new arrivals had spent several days in makeshift camps in Budapest after Hungarian authorities stopped all trains traveling to Austria and Germany. Bavaria's Interior Minister Joachim Herrmann said that every refugee coming to Europe was heading for Germany, and the country could not afford to deal with the situation alone. It was a "completely wrong signal within Europe," he said. A meeting of EU foreign ministers in Luxembourg on Saturday failed to agree on any practical steps for dealing with the record number of migrants arriving in Europe. Austrian Chancellor Werner Faymann has since called for an emergency summit of European leaders on September 14.

The cost of care for refugees could reach around 10 billion euros ($11 billion) in 2015. Amid internal criticism over Chancellor Angela Merkel’s decisions, the CDU and SPD are due to discuss the distribution of costs. According to a report in the Sunday edition of German newspaper, the “Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung” (FAS), financial costs for Germany could reach anywhere between ... Read More »

Wolfsburg sign Julian Draxler from Schalke

In the deal of Germany's transfer deadline day, Wolfsburg have found their replacement for the departed Kevin de Bruyne. German international midfielder Julian Draxler has joined from Schalke. Wolfsburg have confirmed the signing of German international Julian Draxler from Schalke on a five-year deal. The fee for the deal is undisclosed, but reports suggest the 21-year old has joined the German Cup winners for 35 million euros (39.2 million dollars) plus five to seven million in bonuses. "Wolfsburg offers me an excellent chance for my future and an extremely strong team," Draxler told Wolfsburg's club website. "I'm looking forward to playing in the Champions League with Wolfsburg and winning titles with the club." The move is a new transfer record fee paid by Wolfsburg, coming just one day after the Wolves recieved their club record transfer fee for Kevin de Bruyne from Manchester City. "We have made the decision to sell Julian for two reasons, but we can not confirm that transfer fee recieved from Wolfsburg for Julian," Schalke sporting director Horst Heldt to the club's website. "This is the highest transfer fee that Schalke have ever recieved and the request to move came from Julian, which we decided to accept," Heldt continued. Julian Draxler became the Bundesliga's youngest ever player, when he made his Schalke debut on 15 January, 2011, at 17 years, three months and 26 days old. Draxler made his Champions League debut just a month later and since then, has gone on to make 170 appearances for Schalke, scoring 30 goals. Draxler has also made 15 appearances for the German national team, scoring one goal. The Gladbeck born winger was last season linked with a move to the Premier League with Arsenal and this season with a move to the Serie A with Juventus. However, with de Bruyne's departure to Manchester City, Wolfsbrug have acted quickly to sign Draxler as a replacement.

In the deal of Germany’s transfer deadline day, Wolfsburg have found their replacement for the departed Kevin de Bruyne. German international midfielder Julian Draxler has joined from Schalke. Wolfsburg have confirmed the signing of German international Julian Draxler from Schalke on a five-year deal. The fee for the deal is undisclosed, but reports suggest the 21-year old has joined the ... Read More »

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