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Hollande warns against rising nationalism in final New Year’s address

French President Francois Hollande warned against nationalism in his last New Year's address to france. Hollande will not run for a second term in upcoming elections. French President Francois Hollande spoke on the risks of rising nationalism in France and around the world during his televised New Year's address. "How can we imagine our country being curled up behind walls, reduced to its internal market, going back to its national currency and, on top of that, discriminating between its own children according to their origins?" said Hollande. This was Hollande's final New Year's address as president, as he will not seek a second term in presidential elections. The first round of elections will take place in April, and a run-off will occur two weeks later. Anti-immigration and anti-euro party National Front (FN) leader Marine Le Pen is slated to make it to the run-off should the election take place today, according to polls. Hollande did not directly mention FN in his speech, but said the United Kingdom's decision in June to leave the European Union and the US presidential election of Donald Trump were signs that democracy and peace were "vulnerable and reverasable." He also warned against calling the Paris agreement on climate change into question, calling it a "major achievement of the international community." Le Pen dismissed Hollande's criticism. "Talking of isolation for a project that, on the contrary, takes part in the flow of history, after Brexit and Donald Trump's election…is a clear misunderstanding of the world's evolution and peoples' deep aspirations," said Le Pen in a statement. Hollande also defended his legacy as president and paid tribute to those killed in the Bastille Day terrorist attacks in Nice and the ones on a priest and police officers. He said the terrorist threat was still alive in France. "We are not finished with the scourge of terrorism. We must fight it further…abroad: that is the meaning of our military operations in Mali, Syria and Iraq," said Hollande. Hollande announced he would travel to Iraq Monday to visit French troops in the fight against the so-called Islamic State.

French President Francois Hollande warned against nationalism in his last New Year’s address to france. Hollande will not run for a second term in upcoming elections. French President Francois Hollande spoke on the risks of rising nationalism in France and around the world during his televised New Year’s address. “How can we imagine our country being curled up behind walls, ... Read More »

Former Economics Minister Macron to seek French presidency as non-party member

The 38-year-old Macron is seen as a charismatic political newcomer who may be inclined to shake things up. Almost all of his potential rivals for France's top job have issues, either in terms of governance or in policy. Former economy minister Emmanuel Macron is set to announce Wednesday that he will seek the French presidency in 2017. The long-anticipated move has the potential to disrupt election campaigns for candidates on both the right and the left. "He has made up his mind and the decision was taken a long time ago," an unnamed source told Reuters. Macron was a minister in President Francois Hollande's government and served as an adviser before that, but he resigned from the government earlier this year and set up his own political movement "En Marche" (On the Move). The organization now has more than 96,000 members and has already accumulated 2.7 million euros ($2.9 million) in donations. The 38-year-old Macron will seek to seize the political middle ahead of next year's election. To the center-right, candidates for Les Republicains include former Prime Minister Alain Juppe and Nicolas Sarkozy, who lost the presidency in 2012 to Hollande. Sarkozy suffered dismal approval ratings for much of his late term, and left office with support of less than 30 percent. Marine Le Pen, head of the far-right Front National who garnered the third highest number of votes in the first round of the 2012 presidential elections, also poses a significant threat Lowest approval ratings On the left, Hollande, who is suffering the lowest approval ratings of any president in modern French history - under 20 percent, has not yet decided whether to seek a second term. If Hollande decides not to run, the Socialists would likely put forth Prime Minister Manuel Valls as their party candidate. Macron does not plan to run as a Socialist, but would certainly seek the votes of left-wing voters disaffected by Hollande. Macron has sought to position himself as beyond politics but the timing of his announcement - just days before the first round of primaries for Les Republicains party and their center-right allies - brought scorn from Benoist Apparu, a Juppe supporter in Parliament. "He said, broadly - 'I am going to do politics differently, outside of political clans and parties'" Apparu said on BFM TV. "And then the first thing he does is a purely political, calculated, electoral move, telling himself, 'I will try and falsify ... the result of the center-right primary." In France, voters do not have to belong to a political party in order to vote in that party's primary. Macron's announcement could thus compel voters planning to cast a ballot for Juppe to withhold their vote and reserve it for Macron. A recent poll among Socialist voters found Valls leading with 70 percent, with Macron in second place at 50 percent.

The 38-year-old Macron is seen as a charismatic political newcomer who may be inclined to shake things up. Almost all of his potential rivals for France’s top job have issues, either in terms of governance or in policy. Former economy minister Emmanuel Macron is set to announce Wednesday that he will seek the French presidency in 2017. The long-anticipated move ... Read More »

Survivors return as Sting reopens Bataclan concert hall in Paris

Scores of traumatized survivors have revisited the reopened Bataclan concert hall in Paris, one year after terrorists killed 90 at a rock concert. British singer Sting told the crowd that "nothing comes from violence." British singer Sting led a minute's silence at Saturday's concert for the 130 people killed in coordinated attacks across Paris on November 13, 2015, in a renovated Bataclan concert hall smelling of fresh paint. His first song "Fragile" saw many guests weep, but Sing soon brought the crowd to its feet, clapping and stamping to his hit "Message in a Bottle." "Nothing comes from violence and nothing will," said Sting, referring to last year's attacks claimed by the so-called "Islamic State" (IS) group. Guests who were able to get tickets underwent extensive body searches and barricades to reach the packed hall. Some survivors stayed outside the Bataclan in a quiet vigil. Others such as Aurelien, who only gave his first name, went inside, saying he was determined to have a good night. "There's an obligation to be here, because there are 90 people who can't come anymore," he told the Agence France-Presse, referring to those killed at the concert hall. "I'm drinking my beer and I'm hoping to have a good time," he added, saying that he kept "getting flashbacks of that night." Georges Salines, who lost his 28-year-old daughter Lola at the Bataclan, said the concert was "almost a taking back of the space for music and fun from the forces of death." Another survivor, Mariesha Jack Payne, said she traveled from Scotland to Paris' Barometer bar, where she had sheltered during the attack. "Even if I'm not inside [the Bataclan], it's symbolic for me to be here nearby," she said. Proceeds will go to survivors Sting, 65, who played at the Bataclan back in 1979 as the lead singer of The Police, said the proceeds from Saturday's concert would go to two charities helping survivors. More than 1,700 people have been officially recognized as victims of the horror that unfolded at the Bataclan, cafés and France's national stadium. Nine survivors remain hospitalized, while others were paralyzed or suffered life-changing injuries. The Bataclan will remain closed on Sunday's anniversary of the attacks, when President Francois Hollande and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo are scheduled to unveil plagues at the half-dozen sites where revelers were murdered. 'Threat remains' In remarks to several European newspapers on Saturday, French Prime Minister Manuel Valls warned that the "heavy and constant threat" of more terror attacks hung over France. "Yes, terrorism will strike us again," he said, but stressed that "we have all the resources to resist and all the strength to win." Concerts at the Bataclan resume next Wednesday with performances by British singer Pete Doherty, Senegalese star Youssou N'Dour and British singer Marianne Faithfull.

Scores of traumatized survivors have revisited the reopened Bataclan concert hall in Paris, one year after terrorists killed 90 at a rock concert. British singer Sting told the crowd that “nothing comes from violence.” British singer Sting led a minute’s silence at Saturday’s concert for the 130 people killed in coordinated attacks across Paris on November 13, 2015, in a ... Read More »

UK PM David Cameron pleads with EU leaders in Brussels over reforms

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has called on his EU counterparts for their help keeping Britain in the bloc. Germany said it was willing to compromise but France criticized Britain for asking too much. At a meeting of all 28 European Union leaders in Brussels on Thursday, the group took a brief respite from discussing the continent's migrant crisis to mull the next looming threat to the Union: the so-called 'Brexit,' or British exit from the EU. Prime Minister David Cameron used the summit to push for a deal to reform the UK's links to the EU that he could take back to London by February and use to persuade lawmakers to act in favor of remaining in the EU in a referendum he has promised to hold by the end of 2017. "Nothing is certain in life or in Brussels but there is a pathway to a deal in February," Cameron told the press after Thursday's dinner in Brussels with the EU leaders. Hollande: British demands are 'unacceptable' Cameron's German counterpart Angela Merkel struck a cautious tone, saying there was a willingness to hear London's concerns but that there were some values, like the free movement Britain wants to restrict, that could not be amended. "We made it clear that we are ready to compromise, but always on the basis that we safeguard the core European principles, which include non-discrimination and free movement," she said. French President Francois Hollande was even more direct about what he considered Britain's "unacceptable" wish for special rights within the EU. "If it is legitimate to listen to the British prime minister, it is unacceptable to revise founding European commitments," said Hollande. Pace of refugee redistribution irks Austria The rest of the meeting on Thursday was focused on handling the migration crisis across the 28-member bloc as unrest in the Middle East and northern Africa has seen almost a million people seek refuge within their borders. The EU has agreed to a tentative deal to help ease the burden on major migrant destinations by redistributing around 160,000 asylum seekers across the group, but reluctance to implement the measures from central and eastern member nations has seen the process slow down to what other nations have criticized as an unacceptably slow pace. Austria even threatened financial penalties to countries which refuse to cooperate. "All the elements of an immigration strategy are there, but there is still a delivery deficit," said EU President Donald Tusk. "Implementation is insufficient and has to be speeded up," read the joint statement from all member nations at the end of the day's meeting, with a warning that a lack of solutions could place the bloc's free-travel Schengen Zone in jeopardy.

UK Prime Minister David Cameron has called on his EU counterparts for their help keeping Britain in the bloc. Germany said it was willing to compromise but France criticized Britain for asking too much. At a meeting of all 28 European Union leaders in Brussels on Thursday, the group took a brief respite from discussing the continent’s migrant crisis to ... Read More »

US President Obama pays respects to victims of Paris attacks at Bataclan music venue

US President Barack Obama has joined French President Francois Hollande to pay his respects to the victims of the Paris attacks. He is in the French capital to attend the UN climate conference. Shortly after Air Force One touched down in Paris on Sunday, Obama's motorcade traveled straight from Orly Airport to the Bataclan concert hall, where 90 people were killed by jihadi terrorists on November 13. The 'Islamic State' (IS) group claimed responsibility. Along with the Mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, Hollande and Obama each placed a single flower at the music venue's makeshift memorial. After bowing his head in a moment's silence, Obama was seen walking away with his arms around Hollande and Hidalgo. Security on high alert A total of 130 people were killed in a series of shootings and bombings in Paris two weeks ago. It was the deadliest attack on French soil in more than a half-century. As Obama made his way to the Bataclan late on Sunday, helicopters flew overhead and police shut off the roads. With 150 world leaders coming to Paris for the UN climate conference, which gets underway on Monday, security concerns were running high in the French capital, especially in light of the recent terrorist attacks.

US President Barack Obama has joined French President Francois Hollande to pay his respects to the victims of the Paris attacks. He is in the French capital to attend the UN climate conference. Shortly after Air Force One touched down in Paris on Sunday, Obama’s motorcade traveled straight from Orly Airport to the Bataclan concert hall, where 90 people were ... Read More »

Russia and France boost Syria cooperation

Moscow and Paris have agreed to share intelligence about terrorist activity as well as military operations in Syria. Both leaders, however, refused to back down from their position on the future of Bashar al-Assad. Presidents Francois Hollande and Vladimir Putin signaled a new era of Franco-Russian cooperation in Syria on Thursday during the French leader's visit to Moscow. The two powers agreed to put aside differences over the future of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who enjoys the Kremlin's supports but whose position has been called into question by several Western leaders, and share intelligence on "Islamic State" (IS) and other terrorist groups. "What we agreed, and this is important, is to strike only terrorists and Daesh [Islamic State] and to not strike forces that are fighting terrorism. We will exchange information about whom to hit and whom not to hit," Hollande said in their joint press conference. Hollande added that France, still reeling from a coordinated series of IS-linked attacks in Paris, planned to increase its support to moderate rebel groups also fighting IS in Syria. Moscow mulls joining US airstrikes Putin said Russia would consider joining the US-led coalition that has been carrying out airstrikes against IS targets for over a year, but only if one unified code of conduct could be agreed upon. "It should be noted that the number of countries sharing the initiative is growing," Putin said. "We are convinced that the eradication of terrorism in Syria will create necessary conditions for reaching a long-term settlement of the intra-Syrian crisis." He also called the Syrian army a "natural ally" in the fight against IS, and said Assad's fate should not be decided by outsiders. "I believe that the fate of the president of Syria must stay in the hands of the Syrian people," Putin said. For his part, Hollande held fast to the position held by Western powers that Assad "has no place" in the future of Syria. Putin blasts 'betrayal' by Turkey The Russian leader also commented on the downing of a Russian military jet by Turkish forces near that country's border with Syria on Tuesday, an incident that has led to increasingly tense rhetoric and a breakdown of relations between the two countries. Turkey continues to accuse Russia of having violated its airspace - something Moscow vehemently denies. While Hollande commented that the downing of the plane was "serious…obviously regrettable," his Russian counterpart had more choice words for Turkey and its ally the United States. Putin reiterated his belief that militant-controlled regions in Syria are receiving a great amount of oil supplies from within Turkey, and added that it was impossible for the Turkish air force not to recognize their jets. Putin also went after Washington- saying the US military must have known where the plane was flying, before calling the incident an act of betrayal by Turkey, a country Russia had considered to be its friend.

Moscow and Paris have agreed to share intelligence about terrorist activity as well as military operations in Syria. Both leaders, however, refused to back down from their position on the future of Bashar al-Assad. Presidents Francois Hollande and Vladimir Putin signaled a new era of Franco-Russian cooperation in Syria on Thursday during the French leader’s visit to Moscow. The two ... Read More »

Sieren’s China: Terrorism is the ‘enemy of humanity’

"Islamic State" militants have killed a Chinese national for the first time. Beijing has reacted - but not with military force in Syria, writes DW's Frank Sieren. On Thursday, the noon edition of China's state CCTV channel announced the death of Chinese national Fan Jinghui and Norway's Ole Johan Grimsgaard-Ofstad. Both fell into the hands of "Islamic State" (IS) terrorists in as-yet unknown circumstances and were killed with shots to the head. In the latest issue of the English-language online propaganda magazine "Dabiq," IS published images of the two hostages and said they had been killed "after being abandoned by kafir [infidel] nations and organizations." The messages of Chinese President Xi Jinping and Premier Li Keqiang were as clear as those of French President Francois Hollande: "Terrorism is the public enemy of humanity" and "We must bring these criminals to justice." Held hostage for several months Fan, a 50-year-old resident of Beijing, was taken hostage by IS extremists at the beginning of September. The terrorists demanded ransom money for him and his 48-year-old Norwegian co-hostage. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said that Beijing had done everything to rescue them. Prime Minister Li has said that Beijing wants to boost protection of Chinese nationals and organizations abroad, as the terror threat continues to mount. Even though no Chinese citizen died in Paris last week, the latest issue of "Dabiq" legitimized the attacks with the headline "Just terror." Anyone who happened to be in Paris could have died. The murder of Fan Jinghui, however, must be seen as a clear, specific message. The government in Beijing is aware that Chinese citizens are increasingly likely to fall victim to terrorism in crisis-ridden regions. In 2013, 18 Chinese citizens were taken hostage. The figure rose to at least 47 last year, and there could well be more as-yet unknown cases. The Chinese government has denounced the attacks in Paris just like other states in the world, but it does not want to use military force in Syria, as opposed to Russia, France and the US. Instead, like Germany, it favors negotiations in the UN. Beijing has always been in favor of involving Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in the talks. Berlin has now come around on this point: When she was in Beijing earlier this month, Chancellor Angela Merkel did not contradict Prime Minister when he said it was important to "seize the opportunity to implement a political resolution and to set up an equal, inclusive and open political dialogue." On the other hand, since 2011 China and Russia have vetoed a resolution against Syria four times in the UN Security Council on the grounds that the West was interfering too much. As opposed to Moscow, Beijing has stopped providing arms to Syria. China supplied anti-aircraft systems and missile technology until 2011, but since then no arms deliveries can be proven. It must be said, however, that Tehran has supplied arms developed in China but produced in Iran. Focus on Uighur minority Now that a Chinese national has been murdered, Beijing is calling for attacks by Muslim Uighurs in China's conflict-ridden northwestern province of Xinjiang to be categorized as international terrorism. For years, the Chinese government has been fighting against radical elements of the Muslim Uighur minority, who train as terrorists in neighboring Afghanistan and Pakistan and also cooperate with the "Islamic State." Last year, China's state media announced that more than 300 Chinese nationals had travelled to Syria and Iraq to join the ranks of IS. On the other hand, exiled Uighurs have complained that their freedom of religion is becoming more and more restricted and that suspects are not given adequate means of legal defense. One thing is certain: The life of Uighurs in China will get tougher because of IS terrorism. Frank Sieren is considered to be one of Germany's leading experts on China. He has lived in Beijing for 20 years.

“Islamic State” militants have killed a Chinese national for the first time. Beijing has reacted – but not with military force in Syria, writes DW’s Frank Sieren. On Thursday, the noon edition of China’s state CCTV channel announced the death of Chinese national Fan Jinghui and Norway’s Ole Johan Grimsgaard-Ofstad. Both fell into the hands of “Islamic State” (IS) terrorists ... Read More »

France ‘at war’ against ‘Islamic State’

President Hollande has put France on war footing and proposed expanded powers for security services for the next three months. This comes as two were killed and seven arrested in a raid on a suspected mastermind. Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said telephone surveillance and witness statements had led police to believe that Belgian jihadist Abdelhamid Abaaoud was in an apartment in Saint-Denis in northern Paris. Anti-terrorist police flooded the streets near the building, and soldiers were also deployed. The operation lasted around seven hours and left two people dead, including a woman who police say blew herself up. But it's still unclear whether Abaaoud was among those killed or captured by French commandos. "As things stand, it is impossible to give you the identities of the people detained, which are being verified," Molins said. "All will be done to determine who is who, and based on the work of forensic police, we'll tell you who was in the apartment - and what consequences it will have for the development of the investigation." French President Francois Hollande praised the country's security services and said that France was "at war" with the Islamic State group, which has claimed responsibility for the coordinated attacks that killed at least 129 people. "It is the entire country that's been attacked," Hollande told a gathering of French mayors. "For what it represents, the fight we are leading to eradicate terrorism. And simply for what we are." In his televised remarks, Hollande urged the nation not to "give in to fear" or extremist sentiments. "No anti-Semitic or anti-Muslim act can be tolerated," Hollande said. State of emergency for three months? The president's remarks come the same day that a bill to extend France's state of emergency powers for three months is being considered by the cabinet. Hollande had declared a state of emergency for 12 days following Friday night's deadly attacks, and parliament must approve extending it. If passed by the cabinet, it could move its way through both legislative houses by the end of the week. The state of emergency increases search-and-arrest powers of the police and limits public gatherings, including those in mosques and other houses of worship. This comes the same day as the European Commission considers a bloc-wide ban on certain semi-automatic firearms and standardized markings across the European Union. "Organized criminals accessing and trading military-grade firearms in Europe cannot and will not be tolerated," European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said.

President Hollande has put France on war footing and proposed expanded powers for security services for the next three months. This comes as two were killed and seven arrested in a raid on a suspected mastermind. Paris prosecutor Francois Molins said telephone surveillance and witness statements had led police to believe that Belgian jihadist Abdelhamid Abaaoud was in an apartment ... Read More »

France’s Hollande: We’re at war

President Hollande has vowed to destroy IS, which means beefing up security forces and creating a broader international coalition against it. He spoke to a rare joint session of parliament following the Paris attacks. French President Francois Hollande had some decisive words on Monday as he detailed the country's new counterterrorism strategy in the wake of Friday's deadly attacks in Paris. Speaking to a joint session of parliament, the first such speech since former leader Nicolas Sarkozy addressed lawmakers on the financial crisis in 2009, Hollande declared that "France is at war," and would rise to meet the challenge. Hollande told "Islamic State" (IS) terrorists, who claimed responsibility for the violence that left 129 people dead in the French capital, that "the French republic has overcome other obstacles…those who attempted anything against us in history have lost." After commending the response of security forces and offering some words in honor of the victims, the president announced that France would "intensify operations on Syria," and would create 5,000 new jobs in the police and security forces in the next two years. A bill that would extend the state of emergency for three months will be presented to parliament on Wednesday, Hollande said, while also calling for a new law that would strip dual citizens caught with ties to terrorism of their French nationality. While many allies attending the G20 summit in Turkey offered their solidarity and support, including a promise from US President Barack Obama to step up efforts against IS, Hollande asked for more: a "unique" international coalition of all countries who stand against IS, and a special UN resolution against the militant group. Hollande to meet Obama, Putin To advance this goal, Hollande said he would visit Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow this week and then Obama in Washington. While both countries have long been engaged in the fight against IS, their differences over the role of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has prevented a coordinated response. Earlier on Monday, Obama, after vowing to bolster the US airstrikes against IS while eschewing the idea of sending ground troops, was among a number of politicians who warned against conflating the attackers with the influx of refugees now arriving in Europe, reminding the public that many of them are also fleeing IS violence. "Slamming the doors in their faces would be a betrayal of our values," Obama said at the same time that several Republican governors vowed to keep Syrian refugees out of their states. Manhunt expands in Belgium The manhunt for individuals connected to the tragedy continued throughout Monday, focused mainly on Belgium, where the attacks were allegedly prepared. Belgian officials said that two people they arrested over the weekend have been charged with engaging in terrorism-related activities. France's interior minister, Bernard Cazeneuve, said that within French borders 23 individuals have been arrested since Friday, with 104 under house arrest pending investigation. France also began to release the details about some of the attackers, including their connection to IS militant Abdelhamid Abaaoud, who led a terrorist cell from the Belgian city of Verviers.

President Hollande has vowed to destroy IS, which means beefing up security forces and creating a broader international coalition against it. He spoke to a rare joint session of parliament following the Paris attacks. French President Francois Hollande had some decisive words on Monday as he detailed the country’s new counterterrorism strategy in the wake of Friday’s deadly attacks in ... Read More »

France conducts airstrikes on ‘Islamic State’ stronghold in Syrian city of Raqqa

French officials have said warplanes have struck the "Islamic State"-held city of Raqqa in Syria. The news comes as authorities have issued an international warrant for a man believed to have taken part in the attacks. France launched airstrikes Sunday evening against suspected militants from the so-called "Islamic State" in the Syrian city of Raqqa. News of the strikes came as French authorities issued a warrant for a Belgian-born man believed to have taken part in the attacks across Paris on Friday. On Twitter, the Defense Ministry announced that 12 aircraft, including 10 fighter jets, had been involved in the sorties that destroyed a command post, munitions dump and a training camp. "The raid ... was launched simultaneously from the United Arab Emirates and Jordan. Twenty bombs were dropped," the statement said. Carried out in coordination with the US command, the strikes were apparently in retaliation for Friday's attacks in Paris that killed at least 129 people in the French capital. French President Francois Hollande has blamed the "Islamic State" group for the gun and suicide attacks, calling them an "act of war." France issues warrant for Paris suspect Earlier Sunday, French authorities issued an international arrest warrant for a Belgian-born man believed to have taken part in the attacks. The 26-year-old, named as Salah Abdeslam, is one of three brothers believed involved in the killings. He reportedly rented a black Volkswagen Polo that carried a group of hostage-takers who killed at least 89 people inside the Bataclan concert hall in apparently coordinated shootings and suicide bombings. One of the three siblings died during the attack, while another was said to have been detained by police on Saturday. Earlier Sunday, Belgian prosecutors said seven people had been arrested after raids in Brussels. Two assailants living in Belgium were among the killers who died during the attacks. Police also questioned the relatives of one alleged attacker on Sunday, in an effort to gain clues about the attacks. Six detained in France At least six people have been arrested by French police, including the father and brother of Omar Ismail Mostefai, as well as the brother's wife. The six were detained under a French procedure to gather witness statements, although they were not being held as formal suspects. The AFP news agency reported that Mostefai was not close to his family. Police also found a black Seat Leon vehicle, which could have been used by some of the attackers to escape, in the eastern Parisian suburb of Montreuil. Belgian police Saturday detained a French national who was suspected of renting a vehicle found near the attack on the Bataclan. City on edge The Paris attacks left at least 132 dead and over 300 wounded, dozens of them critically. The City of Light remains on edge, with thousands of troops in the streets and tourist sites and public buildings closed. On Sunday, hundreds of mourners were briefly evacuated from the Place de La Republique, which has become a memorial area for those who died in the Friday killings, after firecrackers sparked a false alarm. "Whoever starts running starts everyone else running," said Alice Carton, city council member who was at the square, speaking with AP. "It's a very weird atmosphere. The sirens and screaming are a source of fear."

French officials have said warplanes have struck the “Islamic State”-held city of Raqqa in Syria. The news comes as authorities have issued an international warrant for a man believed to have taken part in the attacks. France launched airstrikes Sunday evening against suspected militants from the so-called “Islamic State” in the Syrian city of Raqqa. News of the strikes came ... Read More »

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