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Cruz, Sanders gain ground over favorites

Republican presidential hopeful Ted Cruz has taken Kansas and Maine, proving his mettle against frontrunner Donald Trump. Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders has claimed Nebraska and Kansas over Hillary Clinton. Texas Senator Ted Cruz (above) won by wide margins Saturday in the Kansas and Maine party caucuses over frontrunner real estate mogul Donald Trump who captured Louisiana and Kentucky. It was a poor showing for other Republicans with US Senator Marco Rubio of Florida and Ohio Governor John Kasich shut out in all four contests. This is leading Cruz to emerge as the last hope for the Republican Party establishment lest Trump - a populist maverick whose outspoken support for torture and strident anti-immigrant rhetoric has made him a divisive figure across the the country - continues his meteoric rise. "What we're seeing is the public coming together, libertarians coming together, men and women who love the Constitution coming together and uniting and standing as one behind this campaign," Cruz said in Idaho. But Trump was having none of it, grabbing headlines by declaring it time for Rubio to drop out of the race and suggesting that the two states he had lost to Cruz didn't matter. "Everyone's trying to figure out how to stop Trump," the mogul boasted at a rally in Orlando, Florida, where he had supporters raise their right hands and swear to vote for him. The next Republican matchups will be Tuesday over the northern industrial state of Michigan, deep south Mississippi, rural Idaho and far-flung Hawaii. March 15 will perhaps be a decisive day of voting as population-rich states including Florida, Illinois and Ohio, each with substantial delegates, will be voting. Democratic contest stays interesting Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state and party establishment favorite, won in Louisiana but failed to stop rival Bernie Sanders from capturing Kansas and Nebraska. These two small Midwestern states - with only 109 delegates at stake - will not change much in the 50-state race, which requires a Democrat to secure 2,383 to win the nomination at the party convention. But the Sanders victory could indicate slowing momentum in Clinton's campaign, which had earlier brushed off the liberal Vermont senator's challenge as barely relevant. She has secured 11 of the 18 states that have held contests, compared to Sanders' seven. As results came out, the former first lady appeared to be taking her next challenge: Michigan. "And I can tell you this: We're going to work for every vote," she said. Meanwhile, Sanders told the Associated Press that there are "some very big states coming up," like New York, California, Oregon and Washington. He predicted that wins in those big states might persuade some so-called superdelegates - elected officials and party officials who will vote at the July party convention - to switch their support from Clinton to Sanders in the hope of holding onto the White House. Without the pledge of these so-called “superdelegates,” Clinton's advantage becomes substantially smaller with her lead narrowing 659 to 455 over Sanders with many large, delegate-rich contests still ahead. The US presidential poll to elect President Barack Obama's successor will be held Tuesday, November 8.

Republican presidential hopeful Ted Cruz has taken Kansas and Maine, proving his mettle against frontrunner Donald Trump. Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders has claimed Nebraska and Kansas over Hillary Clinton. Texas Senator Ted Cruz (above) won by wide margins Saturday in the Kansas and Maine party caucuses over frontrunner real estate mogul Donald Trump who captured Louisiana and Kentucky. It was ... Read More »

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton emerge victorious as presidential race pushes on

In a busy night in US politics, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have notched key election victories. Meanwhile, early Republican favorite Jeb Bush announced his decision to drop out of the race. Saturday was a day of reckoning in the 2016 US presidential race. Donald Trump, the billionaire mogul and former reality TV show host, easily rode to victory in the Republican primary election in South Carolina, solidifying his lead and making it ever more likely that he'll be the party's nominee. In a victory speech held before an audience of cheering supporters, Trump lauded his family while slamming everything from Mexico to the American education system to Barack Obama, whom he called "a political hack." Meanwhile, he saved some faint praise for his opponents, including Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Florida Senator Marco Rubio, as they battled their way through an increasingly challenging presidential race. "It's tough, it's nasty, it's mean, it's vicious," Trump said of the campaign. "It's beautiful." Battle for second place The spotligh was not only on Trump though, observers were also careful to watch Cruz and Rubio, who were neck and neck for second place. "After tonight, this has become a three-person race and we will win the nomination," Rubio told his audience following the results, which put him just ahead of Cruz. Meanwhile, former Florida governor Jeb Bush - once the assumed frontrunner - announced his decision to suspend his campaign. His announcement was met with scattered cries of disapproval as he urged the need for a president who was "a servant, not a master." Hillary takes Nevada In the Democratic caucuses in Nevada, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton managed a slight victory over Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, despite initial speculation Sanders might pull ahead. "Some may have doubted us, but we never doubted each other," she told an audience of cheering supporters shortly after the results were announced. "This one is for you." Nevada was seen as a necessary victory for Clinton, who has been faced with a stiff challenge from Sanders. Before voting started, the Clinton team visited Las Vegas to speak with Latino voters, who form a key part of Clinton's base. Sanders, meanwhile, reiterated his commitment to stay the course and take the fight to the Democratic National Convention.

In a busy night in US politics, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have notched key election victories. Meanwhile, early Republican favorite Jeb Bush announced his decision to drop out of the race. Saturday was a day of reckoning in the 2016 US presidential race. Donald Trump, the billionaire mogul and former reality TV show host, easily rode to victory in ... Read More »

Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump win New Hampshire primary election

Senator Bernie Sanders has defeated Hillary Clinton in the New Hampshire Democratic primary. Meanwhile, billionaire businessman Donald Trump is the clear winner on the Republican side. Two candidates once considered long-shots in the US presidential race pulled ahead of their establishment rivals on Tuesday to easily gain victory in the New Hampshire primary election. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, a Democrat, won by a clear margin against his more famous rival, former Secretary of State and ex-First Lady Hillary Clinton. On the Republican side, businessman Donald Trump took around 33 percent of the votes, beating out rivals with a healthy track record in US politics, including Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Florida Governor Jeb Bush. Vying for Second For observers supporting establishment Republicans like Bush, the fight for second place was just as significant as the one for first place. Ohio governor John Kasich held an early lead in the race for the second spot, followed by Bush and Florida Senator Marco Rubio. For Trump supporters, the billionaire's victory is a vindication of sorts after his defeat at the hands of Cruz in Iowa. "We are going to make America great again," Trump declared to his supporters, who frequently broke into cheers and applause and at one point chanted "USA! USA!" Major victory for Sanders Meanwhile, Sander's decisive victory reaffirms his position as a formidable rival for Clinton, once seen as the inevitable Democratic nominee. The former mayor of Burlington, Vermont, won virtually across the board, earning the majority of votes from men and women, independents and voters under the age of 45. "Together we have sent the message that will echo from Wall Street to Washington, from Maine to California, and that is that the government of our great country belongs to all of the people and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors," Sanders told his supporters following the announcement of the election results. Clinton conceded defeat and called Sanders to congratulate him on his victory. Speaking before a crowd of chanting supporters, she assured her audience the fight had just begun. "I will work harder than anyone to actually make the changes that make your lives better," Clinton said. New Hampshire, a state of 1.3 million people, is the first state in the US to cast ballots in a primary. More than 40 percent of the voters there are independents.

Senator Bernie Sanders has defeated Hillary Clinton in the New Hampshire Democratic primary. Meanwhile, billionaire businessman Donald Trump is the clear winner on the Republican side. Two candidates once considered long-shots in the US presidential race pulled ahead of their establishment rivals on Tuesday to easily gain victory in the New Hampshire primary election. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, a Democrat, ... Read More »

White House hopefuls move on to New Hampshire

The White House race has been thrown wide open after frontrunners from both parties suffered setbacks in the first contest in Iowa. Candidates of all stripes have packed up and are now heading to New Hampshire. The months-long presidential contest kicked into high gear Wednesday, with Democratic and Republican debates this week building up to next week's primary in New Hampshire. Flamboyant billionaire Donald Trump suffered a humbling defeat - polling more than 3 points behind Texan Senator Ted Cruz's 27.7 percent in the Iowa caucus. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida is still in the race, polling 23 percent. Among Democrats, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton - long the presumed nominee - managed to win by a whisker after polling less than three tenths of a percent over Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont. "I'm going to have some work to do to reach out to young voters -- maybe first-time voters who have to make a tough decision as they evaluate who should be our president, our commander-in-chief. I intend to do that," Clinton told CNN after the results. Sanders not conceding Iowa - yet Sanders' campaign has not conceded defeat, considering it a tie, but his campaign manager told CNN he wants a detailed breakdown of results before they officially concede. "We're in this for the long haul," Sanders told reporters as he arrived in New Hampshire where polls put him as a strong favorite. The once-unthinkably-small margin between the former first lady over a self-declared "democratic socialist" is being seen as an indication the Democratic Party is conflicted between the party establishment and leftist voters. That's largely because of concerns among many Americans about the widening wealth gap and economic insecurity have helped Sanders' message resonate among many people, especially younger first-time voters. Republican Party remains an open field Meanwhile on the Republican side, Trump is looking to rebound after his humbling blow in Iowa. He has so far been leading the polls in New Hampshire. But Cruz's strong polling shows the senator remains strong with Christian voters, even if he struggles with many traditional forces in his own party. Rubio - a strong third - remains at top of the stack of establishment candidates vying to be the party's preferred alternative to Trump or Cruz. Trump took to Twitter to release a defiant message attempting to rationalize his poor showing. Polls show well over half of Republican voters are undecided in New Hampshire.

The White House race has been thrown wide open after frontrunners from both parties suffered setbacks in the first contest in Iowa. Candidates of all stripes have packed up and are now heading to New Hampshire. The months-long presidential contest kicked into high gear Wednesday, with Democratic and Republican debates this week building up to next week’s primary in New ... Read More »

Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz wins Iowa caucuses

Texas Senator Ted Cruz has been declared the winner of the Republican caucus in Iowa. The Democratic race is still too close to call with Clinton and Sanders both surpassing 49 percent. As caucus voting in the US state of Iowa wound down on Monday evening, voters’ choices showed a deeply divided electorate as narrow margins saw Ted Cruz emerge as the Republican winner of the first round of primary voting for presidential candidates. With 28% of voting Republicans siding with Cruz at the Iowa Caucus, the Texas Senator managed to beat earlier frontrunner, the controversial real estate mogul Donald Trump, by around 4 points as Trump finished at a little over 24 percent. Florida Senator Marco Rubio, who was earlier thought to have presented a possible upset to his far-right competitor Cruz, came in third with nearly 23 percent of the vote. Trump told supporters he was honored to finish in second, and said critics had told him he could never finish in the top ten. He vowed to fight on - adding he was certain of victory next week in New Hampshire, and that he would go on to win the White House. After months spent considered a long shot, Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, announced on Twitter that he was suspending his White House bid, finishing with less than 2 percent of the vote according to initial projections. This was Huckabee's second try for the presidency, having won Iowa in 2008 in a race that eventually went to John McCain. Clinton and Sanders in dead heat The Democratic race is an even closer call, with Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton running neck and neck with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders at 49 percent as precincts began reporting their numbers. The third Democratic candidate, former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, announced he too was suspending his campaign in the wake of the news that he had garnered less than one percentage point. Leading up to Iowa, surveys had Clinton just out in front of farther left-of-center rival Sanders. Although according to data released by Facebook, it was Sanders who was getting the most buzz on the social media platform. The 74-year-old self-described Democratic socialist has managed to cement his popularity among young voters with plans to combat rising wealth inequality and reduce the drag of student debt. While Iowa is considered an important stepping stone for gathering momentum on the campaign trail, though with 49 more primaries to go, a win does not always ensure the party's nomination. After Huckabee's 2008 Republican win, former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum narrowly took Iowa in 2012 before losing the nomination to Mitt Romney.

Texas Senator Ted Cruz has been declared the winner of the Republican caucus in Iowa. The Democratic race is still too close to call with Clinton and Sanders both surpassing 49 percent. As caucus voting in the US state of Iowa wound down on Monday evening, voters’ choices showed a deeply divided electorate as narrow margins saw Ted Cruz emerge ... Read More »

Iowa caucuses could make or break Sanders, Trump

A vulgar billionaire and a gruff socialist have been pushing the boundaries of US politics for months. Their unorthodox presidential campaigns face a real test for the first time - the good people of Iowa. Before dropping out of the Republican presidential race, South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham is reputed to have learned two things campaigning in Iowa: You need to love Jesus and ethanol. Religion plays a major role in the Midwestern state's Republican caucuses. In 2012, nearly 60 percent of those who participated identified as evangelical Christians. Iowa is the first state to actually vote for the potential US presidential nominees. A strong showing can lend credibility to an unorthodox presidential campaign. This could explain why billionaire Donald Trump - not famous for his religious convictions - made a speech at the world's largest evangelical Christian university two weeks before the Iowa caucuses. Trump's speech at Liberty University secured him the endorsement of the school's president, Jerry Falwell Jr., whose father was one of the most influential evangelical preachers in modern US history. It's unclear whether or not Falwell Jr.'s endorsement will give Trump a boost in Iowa. "Trump has kind of a question mark there in terms of his appeal with the evangelical voters in the state because of his regard for religion," Donna Hoffman, an expert on the caucuses at the University of Northern Iowa, told DW. "He did attend a church service - that was well documented recently," she said. The ethanol lobby If religion is big politics, then ethanol is big business in Iowa. The state produces 3.9 billion gallons of the biofuel annually, 27 percent of the total US production. "Trump has pulled ahead of Cruz in the most recent polls, after the two were neck and neck for weeks." US federal law requires mixing biofuel into the nation's fuel supply, a boon for Iowa. Cruz, who opposes government mandates, wants to do away with the biofuel rules. In response, the state's Republican governor told the party faithful to vote for anyone but Cruz. "He's opposed to ethanol and biodiesel," Governor Terry Branstad told a press conference. "And we have tens of thousands of jobs and a lot of farm income dependent on that." The Texas senator does have solid evangelical credentials. Unlike Trump, he has consistently opposed gay rights and abortion. His father, an evangelical preacher, has also taken to the campaign trail. "Cruz's strategy is based on the claim that there's an entire cash of missing evangelical voters who haven't voted in the past because no candidate has been sufficiently Christian and conservative for them," Dennis Goldford, an expert on the Iowa caucuses at Drake University, told DW. Democrats: pragmatic or progressive? On the other side of the political aisle, it's the progressive Democrats who tend to turn out in large numbers. According to a recent Des Moines Register/Bloomberg Politics poll, 43 percent of likely Democratic caucus-goers identified as socialists. They are also less religious compared to the Republican caucus-goers. In the same poll, 30 percent of Democrats identified as devoutly religious, compared to 62 percent of Republicans. Bernie Sanders, a self-described democratic socialist, has given centrist Hillary Clinton a run for her money in Iowa. The two candidates are in a statistical dead heat. In October, Clinton led Sanders by a 40-percent margin in one Monmouth University poll. Sanders' forceful message, railing against the "billionaire class" and vowing to fight income inequality, has captured the moment. But many voters value Clinton's broad experience as first lady, senator from New York and secretary of state under President Obama. "The Democrats, at least in looking at some of the polling that's been done, have been focusing a little more than the Republicans on electability," Hoffman said. "Bernie has an appeal, but Clinton has the experience. There's a pragmatic streak to Democratic caucus-goers." Clinton has also presented herself as the natural heir to Obama, who remains very popular with Democrats if not with the broader American public. Getting out the vote Only registered Republicans and Democrats can participate in the caucus system, and they tend to be party stalwarts. According to Hoffman, much of Trump's support appears to come from Iowans who have never participated in the caucuses before. "It does appear that Trump has some appeal, both at the national level but also in public opinion polls in Iowa," Hoffman said. "But it's difficult to poll caucus-goers." The open question with Trump … is whether those people support him enthusiastically enough that they'll actually go," she said. As in the case of Trump, Sanders is appealing to many people who haven't participated in the process before. Though he's polling well, it's unclear if that will translate into turnout on caucus night. According Goldford, there was no increase in voter registration among Democrats and Republicans from July through December, which doesn't bode well for Trump and Sanders. But the numbers for January are not in yet, which means anything is still possible. "There's more of an outsider theme this year, which raises the question whether this is an unusual year," Goldford said. "That's what we're waiting to find out."

A vulgar billionaire and a gruff socialist have been pushing the boundaries of US politics for months. Their unorthodox presidential campaigns face a real test for the first time – the good people of Iowa. Before dropping out of the Republican presidential race, South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham is reputed to have learned two things campaigning in Iowa: You need ... Read More »

George Pataki pulls out of Republican race for US presidency

Former New York governor George Pataki has pulled out of the race to be the Republican nominee for US president. Analysts say the centrist has failed to gain traction amid the dominance of billionaire Donald Trump. In an announcement on TV on Tuesday evening, Pataki told his supporters that he was dropping his long-shot bid for the 2016 Republican nomination. "While tonight is the end of my journey for the White House as I suspend my campaign for president, I'm confident we can elect the right person, someone who will bring us together," he said. The 70-year-old was described as a moderate voice in a field of particularly conservative candidates. Pataki ranked at the bottom of the list of 13 Republican potential nominees in a recent Reuters/Ipsos poll and has had trouble raising funds, political analysts said. His pull-out is likely to have little impact on the Republican race, in which Donald Trump leads the field. The billionaire businessman has faced tough scrutiny from other candidates during two Republican TV debates. Trump's tactics questioned But Pataki has previously said that the real estate magnate and former star of TV's "The Apprentice" is unfit to be president. "Donald Trump is the know-nothing candidate of the 21st century and cannot be our nominee," he told supporters last month. Pataki is a former three-term New York governor, who held the role at the time of the September 11 terrorist attacks but who has not been in office for a decade. Earlier on Tuesday, two members of his steering committee gave the media advance warning that Pataki was to pull out of the race. The first state-wide vote in the nominating process is due to take place on February 1 in Iowa. Trump currently has 39.3 percent support, according to the latest Reuters/Ipsos poll, in part thanks to several controversial statements on immigration and Muslims, which have been widely denounced. Jeb Bush, the brother of former US President George W Bush, is also in the running.

Former New York governor George Pataki has pulled out of the race to be the Republican nominee for US president. Analysts say the centrist has failed to gain traction amid the dominance of billionaire Donald Trump. In an announcement on TV on Tuesday evening, Pataki told his supporters that he was dropping his long-shot bid for the 2016 Republican nomination. ... Read More »

Republicans slam US presidential candidate Trump’s plan to deport 11 million immigrants

Republican frontrunner Donald Trump has said during a presidential debate he would deport around 11 million 'illegal' immigrants from the US. Conservative politicians slammed the billionaire's proposal as 'impractical.' Two Republicans vying for the next US presidency on Tuesday slammed Republican frontrunner Donald Trump over his proposal to deport around 11 million undocumented immigrants in the US during a GOP debate. Both former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Ohio Governor John Kasich lashed out at Trump, describing the deportation plan as impractical. "Twelve million illegal immigrants: to send them back - 500,000 a month - is just not possible. And it's not embracing American values. It would tear communities apart, and it would send signals that America is not the kind of country I know it is," Bush said. Bush said that Trump's statements also bolster Democratic presidential candidate and former US State Secretary Hillary Clinton. "That's the problem with this. We need to win the presidency, and the way you win the presidency is to have practical plans," Bush said at the Republican debate in Milwaukee, adding that Clinton's aides were "doing high-fives" over Trump's remarks. Clinton's press secretary Brian Fallon tweeted "we actually are doing high-fives right now." Trump was criticized earlier this year for describing Hispanic immigrants as criminals and "rapists." "They're not sending you. They're sending people that have lots of problems, and they're bringing those problems with us. They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people," Trump said. The billionaire also said he would deport Syrian refugees for fear they may be part of the "Islamic State" militant group. US immigration policy continues to be a hot subject for Republican presidential contenders as they fight to set themselves apart from their competition.

Republican frontrunner Donald Trump has said during a presidential debate he would deport around 11 million ‘illegal’ immigrants from the US. Conservative politicians slammed the billionaire’s proposal as ‘impractical.’ Two Republicans vying for the next US presidency on Tuesday slammed Republican frontrunner Donald Trump over his proposal to deport around 11 million undocumented immigrants in the US during a GOP ... Read More »

What Donald Trump learned from his German grandpa Friedrich Drumpf

Want to understand the phenomenon called Donald Trump and his surprising rise to the top of the Republican presidential field? Then you’d better check out his German roots, Trump biographer Gwenda Blair tells DW. DW: Why do you think that Donald Trump's German roots are essential to understanding the person who is currently leading the Republican presidential field? Gwenda Blair: His grandfather Friedrich Drumpf came to the United States in 1885 which was the height of German immigration to the United States when he was 16. His family was from Kallstadt, winegrowers. The first step to the Donald Trump we know today is that his grandfather did not want to be a vintner, nor did he want to be a barber which is what he was trained to do when he first said he did not want to be involved in growing grapes. He came to New York and, after he learnt English, he went to the West Coast, ran restaurants, amassed a nest egg, then went back to Kallstadt, married the girl next door and brought her to New York. But she was extremely homesick, so they went back to Kallstadt and he tried to repatriate because he had become an American citizen. But whether on purpose or not, he had managed to miss military service - when he left he was too young and after he came back he was just a couple of months too old, which he said was absolutely coincidental. German authorities however thought this was not coincidental at all and refused to let him repatriate. They said he was a draft-dodger, expelled and deported him to the place he came from - the United States - which is how the Trumps ended up as Americans after all instead of simply being a family in Germany that had a grandfather who had spent some years in the United States. What traits of his grandfather and father do you think are also reflected in Donald Trump and the way he conducts his business and political career? They are really an impressive through line of people who would do anything to get ahead and win. They are all enormously tenacious, never give up and are willing to push the envelope to bend the rules and find the loopholes. Grandpa Trump built his restaurants on land that he did not own. In that time of the Gold Rush in the Klondike, it was the Wild West period. It was wide open, very raw, lots of single men desperately trying to find gold - and prostitutes. And Grandpa Trump's restaurants had liquor, food and access to women. His restaurants had little cubicles off to the sides with heavy curtains - so called private rooms for ladies - which was absolutely understood to mean prostitutes. His establishment was not the exception there, but he certainly did well by that. And after that he went back to Germany and claimed that he was quiet man who avoided bars in his petition to repatriate. His son Fred, who made his money in real estate in the outer boroughs of New York City, was very good at finding loopholes. When he was building state-financed housing he set up shell equipment companies and then rented bulldozers and trucks from himself at very high and inflated prices. It was not illegal, but he was pushing the edge and bending the rules. He was very good at that. Donald in turn has been very good at finding loopholes and bending rules when he built Trump Towers for example. He hired undocumented Polish workers to do the demolition of the building that had been there before, paid them very low wages and had them sleep on the building site, because they were on such a rushed schedule. Later on he said he had not noticed that they were undocumented which he could not have missed. He is very good at that. With his own family's immigration experience how do you explain Trump's anti-immigrant stance and his vitriolic rhetoric against immigrants? He has been very good a figuring out who his audience is. I am not sure we can call that a German trait, but it is certainly part of his family culture of looking to who the audience is. His grandfather looked to who the audience was when he had those restaurants in the Klondike. His father looked to who the audience was when he built his housing in the outer boroughs of New York which was nothing like what we associate with Donald Trump today. It was middle income housing, but he added a little extra touch that his would-be customers appreciated like an extra closet. He was very good at marketing. And Donald in turn has been very good at marketing to what he decided is his audience. In this case, the upcoming election, that is the big mass of alienated, unhappy and angry Americans who feel "our country used to be great and it's not anymore and it's somebody else's fault." They want somebody to make it right and get them the respect and the prosperity they think they deserve. And Trump has been very skillful at seeing this mass of angry people and positioning himself as their champion and making it clear to them that he is going to go against anything that is in their way - no matter whether it is immigrants, a famous Republican war hero like John McCain, a woman like Fox host Megan Kelly or a hedge fund manager. So going after immigrants is an easy target to pick off when he is trying to appeal to this mass of mostly white voters in the United States who feel like they have been left behind. So it does not bother him that he is in a way betraying his own family history with his stance on immigration? I don't think contradictions have ever bothered him, which has been confounding obviously to people observing the primary race. He is all over the map politically and I don't think it matters to him. He used to be a Democrat, but now he'll be a Republican. Now he is conservative, but he used to be liberal. He used to be for the right for an abortion, now he is hedging back on that. He used to be for immigration reform, now he is against. He moves back and forth very fluidly. I think that is the least bit of concern. Gwenda Blair is the author of "Trumps: Three Generations That Built an Empire" and "Donald Trump: Master Apprentice". She teaches journalism at Columbia University. The interview was conducted by Michael Knigge.

Want to understand the phenomenon called Donald Trump and his surprising rise to the top of the Republican presidential field? Then you’d better check out his German roots, Trump biographer Gwenda Blair tells DW. DW: Why do you think that Donald Trump’s German roots are essential to understanding the person who is currently leading the Republican presidential field? Gwenda Blair: ... Read More »

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