You are here: Home » Tag Archives: donald trump (page 11)

Tag Archives: donald trump

Feed Subscription

Hillary Clinton formally declared Democratic party nominee

Clinton has passed the vote threshold at the Democratic convention in Philadelphia to win the party's backing. She makes history by becoming the first woman to be nominated for president by a major US party. In a symbolic show of party unity, Clinton's former rival, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, told the convention chairwoman that the former first lady should be selected as the party's nominee by acclamation (crowd approval). "I move that Hillary Clinton be selected as the nominee of the Democratic Party for president of the United States," Sanders announced, as the convention roll call reached his home state, a process where each state declares its delegate counts. Following the announcement, Clinton tweeted just one word: "History." The confirmation was greeted with cheers from ecstatic Clinton supporters, who drowned out jeers from Sanders' supporters. Senior Democrats took to the stage to praise their new nominee. Clinton later addressed the crowd in a short live video from New York, telling them, "We have put the biggest crack yet in that glass ceiling." A few minutes before the announcement, Clinton had been confirmed to have passed the delegate threshold of 2,382 delegates to win the nomination. She later emerged with a total of 2,842 votes to Sanders' 1,865 votes. The former New York senator and secretary of state had faced Sanders in a tough primary fight for the nomination, which lasted more than a year. Although Sanders endorsed Clinton, some of his supporters protested in Philadelphia against the party leadership's apparent backing of her during the bitter Democratic primary fight. Earlier Tuesday at the Democratic National Convention, Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski placed Clinton's name in nomination, a move that was later seconded by civil rights leader and Georgia Representative John Lewis. The symbolic roll call was packed with extra emotion over Clinton's historic achievement. A 102-year-old woman, born before women had the right to vote, cast the ballots for the state of Arizona In a speech at the convention later Tuesday, former US President Bill Clinton paid tribute to his wife, saying "she would make America stronger together," a reference to her campaign slogan, "because she's been doing it all of her life." He praised Hillary as a force for change and a longtime fighter for social justice as he made a case for her historic 2016 bid for the presidency. The former US secretary of state is expected to formally accept the party's nomination in a speech at the Convention Thursday. Clinton will now face Republican nominee Donald Trump in the final race for the White House. The US will vote to replace two-term President Barack Obama on November 8. The latest Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll predicts a close race. But Trump has taken a 2 point lead over Clinton with 39 percent support, versus 37 percent for the former First Lady.

Clinton has passed the vote threshold at the Democratic convention in Philadelphia to win the party’s backing. She makes history by becoming the first woman to be nominated for president by a major US party. In a symbolic show of party unity, Clinton’s former rival, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, told the convention chairwoman that the former first lady should be ... Read More »

US Republicans give Trump formal bump to take on Clinton

Republicans have nominated Donald Trump as their presidential candidate. Blocks away, police took on groups of demonstrators protesting the billionaire's statements on race, the environment and gender equality. Despite some delegates' voicing dislike for Donald Trump, Republicans were all but assured to choose him to lead the party's charge against the Democrat Hillary Clinton over the next 110 days until the November poll. It ended an insurrection by Trump's opponents within the party, who had staged a failed attempt to force a vote opposing his candidacy on Monday. "He is a warrior and a winner," said Senator Jeff Sessions, who represents the Southern state of Alabama in the upper chamber of the US's bicameral legislature. "He loves his country and is determined to see it be a winner again." Sessions called Trump, who had most recently worked as a reality show host, "the singular leader who can get this country back on track." Trump trails former Secretary of State Clinton in many opinion polls after he inflicted nearly as much damage on himself as on his more than 16 Republican opponents - many of whom boast more impressive electoral resumes than he does - in the scorched-earth 2016 primary campaign. Still, the lead of the former first lady and New York senator has slipped to seven points, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll released late Tuesday. Protests and plagiarism? Accusations of plagiarism continue to dog Melania Trump. Her endorsement of her husband on Monday appeared to repeat word-for-word statements made by current first lady Michella Obama when her husband, Barack, awaited the Democratic nomination at the party's 2008 convention. As critics accused Trump of lifting passages from Obama's speech, a campaign official suggested that the similarity had resulted from an error by the potential first lady's speechwriters. If that proved the case, Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus said, he would probably fire the writer. Late Tuesday outside the Quicken Loans Arena - which takes its name from a high-interest short-term cash advance service that targets low-income customers - demonstrators appeared outnumbered by police and members of the media. Police on bike and on foot formed lines to keep pockets of competing protesters separated. Officers on bicycles formed a line between a right-wing religious group and left-leaning protesters carrying a sign that read "America Was Never Great" - a reference to Trump's repeated pledge to "make America great again." In order to do so, Trump has endorsed a temporary ban on immigration from primarily Islamic countries and the building of a wall on the US's border with Mexico. In an interview released early Wednesday, the news agency Reuters reported that German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said Trump dealt in a "politics of fear and isolation."

Republicans have nominated Donald Trump as their presidential candidate. Blocks away, police took on groups of demonstrators protesting the billionaire’s statements on race, the environment and gender equality. Despite some delegates’ voicing dislike for Donald Trump, Republicans were all but assured to choose him to lead the party’s charge against the Democrat Hillary Clinton over the next 110 days until ... Read More »

US Republicans close ranks around Trump

The real estate mogul-turned-presidential hopeful has tried to put the party convention back on track following a rank-and-file revolt. Outside the venue, jitters continue over lax gun laws allowing open carry. Trump broke with tradition on Monday by appearing at the convention before his nomination, following a failed attempt by floor delegates to force a re-vote to overturn his nomination. Many are furious that the party of Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt will be led by a man who described most Mexicans as rapists and advocated barring Muslims from entering the US. "We're going to win so big" he told convention delegates to thunderous cheers. An anti-Trump faction had tried to force a state-by-state roll call vote which could lead to denying Trump an automatic nomination. But despite what initially appeared to be a successful attempt to force a full vote, Republican leaders proceeded with a quick voice vote and Trump's team declared the "dump Trump" movement vanquished. In a sign of lingering party divisions, senior party figures are staying away from Cleveland, including the entire Bush clan, 2008 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and even host state Ohio's sitting governor, John Kasich, who was visiting Cleveland but not the convention grounds. Melania treads familiar ground ā€“ very familar ground "Ladies and gentlemen, it is my great honor to present the next First Lady of the United States," Trump said as he invited his wife to address delegates on the first day. The speech by Slovenian former model Melania Trump, was a passionate treatise on personal strengths gained by inheriting a strong work ethic from her elders. "We need to pass those lessons on to the many generations to follow," Mrs. Trump said. "Because we want our children in this nation to know that the only limit to your achievements is the strength of your dreams and your willingness to work for them." The speech appeared to be well-received and why not? It had been delivered before. Observers were quick to note that entire lines had been lifted from First Lady Michelle Obama's 2008 to the Democratic National Convention in Denver. In that speech, Mrs. Obama had said her husband and her had built their lives guided by their parents values, "because we want our children - and all children in this nation - to know that the only limit to the height of your achievements is the reach of your dreams and your willingness to work hard for them." The Trump campaign responded to reports on the lifted passages by releasing a statement but didnā€™t mention Michelle Obama. "In writing her beautiful speech, Melania's team of writers took notes on her life's inspirations, and in some instances included fragments that reflected her own thinking," Trump spokesman Jason Miller said. Open carry of firearms worry police Security in the city of Cleveland has been extremely tight with a federal grant of nearly $50 million (45 million euros) ensuring city police have the latest military-grade hardware to combat threats from violent protests ā€“ or worse. As added precautions tents, ladders, coolers, canned goods, tennis balls and bicycle locks are banned in the area surrounding the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. But firearms are fine. Despite protests from police unions to suspend Ohio's lax open carry laws allowing citizens to wield military-grade firearms, Ohio Governor John Kasich has rejected the request pointing out he lacked the authority to overturn law by diktat. Open carry activists say they won't give up their right to bear arms, which they say is enshrined in the US Sonstitution. "We're sympathetic to law enforcement being concerned about their safety, but that doesn't mean we give up citizens' rights just to make it easier to police large events," John Pierce, co-founder of national advocacy group OpenCarry.org, told the Reuters news agency. Even so, things have been orderly so far. Hundreds of Trump supporters and opponents held rallies a half-mile apart, with a few of the Trump supporters openly carrying guns even though it is their apparent legal right in the state of Ohio.

The real estate mogul-turned-presidential hopeful has tried to put the party convention back on track following a rank-and-file revolt. Outside the venue, jitters continue over lax gun laws allowing open carry. Trump broke with tradition on Monday by appearing at the convention before his nomination, following a failed attempt by floor delegates to force a re-vote to overturn his nomination. ... Read More »

Sanders endorses Clinton nomination at joint campaign rally

Democrat Bernie Sanders has endorsed his party's presumptive presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a New Hampshire campaign rally. Sanders said Hillary would be a better choice as US president than Donald Trump. Just two weeks shy of the Democratic National Convention, Bernie Sanders finally offered his full support to rival Hillary Clinton to take on the Republican presumptive nominee Donald Trump. "Secretary Clinton has won the Democratic nominating process, and I congratulate her for that," Sanders told a cheering crowd in New Hampshire with Clinton at his side. Sanders, who was critical of Clinton during the Democratic Party's primaries, vowed to do everything he could to help her beat Trump in the upcoming presidential election. "It is no secret that Hillary Clinton and I disagree on a number of issues - that's what this campaign has been about," said Sanders. "There was a significant coming together between the two campaigns and we produced, by far, the most progressive platform in the history of the Democratic Party." 'Better than Trump' Emphasizing why he believed Clinton would make a better president than Trump, Sanders said he and the former Secretary of State shared similar values on gay rights, universal health care and a higher minimum wage. "If anyone out there thinks that this election is not important, take a moment to think about the Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump will nominate, and what that means to civil liberties, equal rights and the future of our country," said Sanders, whose calls for a "political revolution" had influenced millions of voters across the country. "She must become our next president." Clinton thankful Expressing her joy at Sanders' endorsement, Clinton said the election would be far more enjoyable now with her formal rival on her side. Clinton commended Sanders for energizing the primary process and bringing "people off the sidelines and into the political process." "His [Sanders'] reputation for passionate advocacy hasn't always made him the most popular person in Washington. But that's generally a sign that you're doing something right," the former First Lady said. US President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and several other senior Democrats have already offered endorsements to Clinton.

Democrat Bernie Sanders has endorsed his party’s presumptive presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at a New Hampshire campaign rally. Sanders said Hillary would be a better choice as US president than Donald Trump. Just two weeks shy of the Democratic National Convention, Bernie Sanders finally offered his full support to rival Hillary Clinton to take on the Republican presumptive nominee Donald ... Read More »

Donald Trump mulls increased racial profiling in wake of Orlando attack

Donald Trump has suggested the US should "seriously" consider profiling Muslims inside the country to fight terror. The presumptive Republican nominee has previously called for a ban on Muslim immigration to the US. Presumptive US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump said Sunday that the United States should consider more racial profiling, in the wake of last week's massacre at an Orlando nightclub. "I think profiling is something that we're going to have to start thinking about as a country," Trump told the CBS political talk show "Face the Nation." "You look at Israel and you look at others, and they do it and they do it successfully. And you know, I hate the concept of profiling, but we have to start using common sense," he said. Trump sparked criticism for his comments on American Muslims after the Orlando shooting, in which a US-born Muslim man killed 49 people at a gay nightclub. He stood by his call to suspend immigration from countries with "a proven history of terrorism." Trump had also previously called for a temporary ban on Muslim immigration to America after a Muslim-American and his wife killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California in December. US Muslims, Trump said, should "cooperate with law enforcement and turn in the people who they know are bad." The Orlando shooter, Omar Mateen, was born in the US to Afghan immigrant parents. He had expressed support for the so-called "Islamic State" during the three-hour siege at the Pulse nightclub, but officials believe he was self-radicalized. Trump said in the interview that there were "red flags" around Mateen, who had been investigated by the FBI but not arrested. He also called for increased scrutiny of mosques. "If you go to France right now, they're doing it in France. In fact, in some instances they're closing down mosques," he said. Some mosques in France were closed in the wake of the November attacks in Paris that killed 130 people. Trump roundly criticized Trump's proposals have been criticized by Democrats as well as Republicans, including House Speaker Paul Ryan. Civil libertarians, Muslims and others also have strongly disagreed, arguing profiling is unconstitutional and constitutes unlawful discrimination based on race, religion and other factors. Meanwhile, US Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in an interview that law enforcement should remain allied with groups that might have helpful information, "It is very important for to us maintain our contacts within the Muslim community, because, often, individuals, if they're from that community and they're being radicalized, their friends and family members will see it first. They will see activity first. And we want that information to come to us," Lynch told CNN's "State of Union."

Donald Trump has suggested the US should “seriously” consider profiling Muslims inside the country to fight terror. The presumptive Republican nominee has previously called for a ban on Muslim immigration to the US. Presumptive US Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump said Sunday that the United States should consider more racial profiling, in the wake of last week’s massacre at an ... Read More »

AP: Hillary Clinton secures enough delegates to clinch Democratic presidential nomination

Hillary Clinton has captured enough delegates to secure her party's nomination, according to an AP count. She is poised to become the first woman in US history to win the presidential nomination of any major party. Clinton had received enough commitments from delegates by Monday to become the Democratic Party's presumptive presidential nominee, the Associated Press reported. AP said the count of delegates won in primaries and caucuses, as well as a survey of party insiders known as superdelegates, showed that Clinton had the overall support of the required 2,383 delegates. The former secretary of state was reported to have crossed the crucial threshold with a decisive weekend win in Puerto Rico. As a result, the agency said, Clinton had 1,812 pledged delegates and could count on the support of 571 superdelegates. Clinton welcomed the news in a rally at Long Beach, California, but urged supporters to concentrate on forthcoming votes in six US states. "According to the news we are on the brink of an historic, unprecedented moment. But we still have work to do, don't we? We have six elections tomorrow and we're going to fight hard for every single vote, especially here in Calilfornia," Clinton said on Monday. Sanders' team blames media The campaign team behind Clinton's nomination opponent, Bernie Sanders, said it was wrong for the media to call Clinton's nomination. "It is unfortunate that the media, in a rush to judgement, are ignoring the Democratic National Committee's clear statement that it is wrong to count the votes of superdelegates before they actually vote at the convention this summer," said Sanders' spokesman Michael Briggs. Clinton "does not have and will not have the requisite number of pledged delegates to secure the nomination," Briggs said, adding that Sanders would seek to "convince those superdelegates that Bernie is by far the strongest candidate against Donald Trump." As the presumptive nominee, the former first lady would formally accept her party's nomination in July at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Securing a historic first The nomination would make Clinton the first woman to run at the top of the ticket for a major US political party. It would also see Clinton take on divisive billionaire businessman Donald Trump in the November elections, with the Oval Office as the ultimate prize. Clinton had vowed earlier on Monday that she would "take the fight to Donald Trump and defeat him in November." Clinton leaves Sanders trailing by more than 3 million cast votes; 291 pledged delegates and 523 superdelegates - a wider margin of victory than President Barack Obama had when he clinched the nomination in 2008.

Hillary Clinton has captured enough delegates to secure her party’s nomination, according to an AP count. She is poised to become the first woman in US history to win the presidential nomination of any major party. Clinton had received enough commitments from delegates by Monday to become the Democratic Party’s presumptive presidential nominee, the Associated Press reported. AP said the ... Read More »

US House Speaker Paul Ryan ‘not ready’ to support Donald Trump

Paul Ryan, second in line to the US presidency, has said he's not ready to back presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump. The Republican front-runner has fired back with some stern words for Ryan. In a bombshell announcement during an interview with broadcaster CNN on Thursday, Paul Ryan - the highest-ranking office-holder in the Republican Party - said he wasn't prepared to throw his weight behind Donald Trump, his party's likely presidential nominee. "To be perfectly candid with you, I'm not ready to do that yet," Ryan said of a possible endorsement. "He's got some work to do," he added. As speaker of the US House of Representatives, Ryan is the second in line to the presidency after the vice president and wields enormous influence in Washington. His predecessor, Republican John Boehner, made headlines last week after he called Trump's former rival Ted Cruz "Lucifer in the flesh." Cruz announced the end of his presidential campaign on Tuesday after losing to Trump in the Indiana primary. Clarifying on why he wasn't ready to support Trump, Ryan said he felt the New York billionaire hasn't shown he has the qualities necessary to serve as the nation's commander in chief. "To be the party and climb the final hill and win, we need a standard-bearer that can unify all - all conservatives and the wings of the party - and then go to the country with an appealing agenda," Ryan said. "The nominee has to lead in that effort," he added. Trump fires back Shortly after the interview, Trump shot back with a statement essentially saying the same thing about Ryan. "I am not ready to support Speaker Ryan's agenda," Trump's statement read. "Perhaps in the future we can work together and come to an agreement about what is best for the American people. They have been treated so badly for so long that it is about time for politicians to put them first!" Even before his exchange of words with Ryan, Trump had already made headlines on Thursday when he tweeted a photo of himself in honor of Cinco de Mayo, the day Mexico honors its army's victory over France during the Battle of Puebla. The tweet sparked equal amounts of ridicule and outrage from the public. Trump has courted controversy with the sizeable Hispanic population in the United States, having referred to immigrants from Mexico, for instance, as "rapists" and suggesting most of them are drug dealers and criminals. Ryan is not the only high-ranking Republican to waffle when it comes to Trump. Following his landslide victory against Cruz on Tuesday, several other well-respected conservatives either hinted or said explicitly they wouldn't support the New Yorker. Mark Salter, for instance, a former adviser to John McCain and Sarah Palin in the 2008 presidential race, tweeted that he was supporting Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton. Meanwhile, in an obvious slight, George W. Bush and his father George H.W. Bush, both former presidents, said they wouldn't attend the Republican National Convention in July.

Paul Ryan, second in line to the US presidency, has said he’s not ready to back presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump. The Republican front-runner has fired back with some stern words for Ryan. In a bombshell announcement during an interview with broadcaster CNN on Thursday, Paul Ryan – the highest-ranking office-holder in the Republican Party – said he wasn’t prepared ... Read More »

US presidential hopeful Ted Cruz ends bid for Republican nomination

Ted Cruz has said he is ending his presidential campaign after suffering a defeat to Donald Trump in Indiana. Bernie Sanders is projected to have won the Democratic vote. Cruz announced late Tuesday that he no longer had a viable route to victory, amid cries of shock and disappointment from supporters. "From the beginning, I've said that I would continue on as long as there was a viable path to victory. Tonight, I'm sorry to say, it appears that path has been foreclosed," the Texas senator told the crowd in Indianapolis. "We gave it everything we've got, but the voters chose another path," said Cruz, whose exit leaves the outsider John Kasich as Trump's sole challenger. Trump was on track to take well over 50 percent of the vote in Indiana, US broadcasters had announced earlier on Tuesday, bringing him much closer to outright victory in the race to be the party's candidate for the White House. Cruz had been counting on a win in Indiana's primary to slow the New York billionaire's progress toward the Republican nomination. But polls in recent days showed Trump opening up a substantial lead in the Midwestern state over the Texas senator, whose brand of Christian conservatism had been expected to have wide appeal. Based on 13 percent of precincts reporting, the billionaire took 53.8 percent of the vote, streets ahead of Cruz on 33.9 and Ohio Governor John Kasich on 9.4 percent. Shortly after Cruz's exit, Reince Preibus, the chairman of the Republican Party declared Trump the presumptive nominee, despite his candidacy deeply dividing the party in recent months. Trump strides ahead Cruz's suspension firmly sets Trump on the path to the Republican nomination, as although, Ohio Governor John Kasich remains in the race, he has barely one-tenth of Trump's support, and analysts say it will be difficult for him to catch up. To win the nomination, Trump needs support from 1,237 Republican delegates and has currently amassed 1,002 names, according to CNN's tally. While Cruz had won 572 delegates, Kasich trails with 156. But the New York billionaire could still be denied the nomination at the party's Convention, which runs from July 18 to 21 in Cleveland, Ohio. Rivalry intensifies Ahead of Tuesday's vote, the attacks between the two rivals grew noticeably more personal. In a Fox News interview, Trump linked Cruz's father to the murderer of John F. Kennedy, causing the Texas senator to fire back by calling Trump a "moron," among other things. "We are not a proud, boastful, self-centered, mean-spirited, hateful, bullying nation," Cruz said alongside his wife Heidi and running mate Carly Fiorina earlier in the day. "If Indiana does not act, this country could well plunge into the abyss." Trump had his own words for Cruz, however. In a statement released following the senator's most recent comments, Trump said Cruz was "a desperate candidate trying to save his failing campaign." "Today's ridiculous outburst only proves what I have been saying for a long time, that Ted Cruz does not have the temperament to be President of the United States." Cruz also faced criticism for his choice of running mate, businesswoman Carly Fiorina. Democratic race tight The Democratic race saw Bernie Sanders beat off Hillary Clinton in the same Midwestern state, according to a projection by The Associated Press. The self-declared democratic socialist, was ahead of Clinton by 53.2 percent to 46.8 percent with about three quarters of precincts reporting, although Clinton remained well ahead in the delegate battle for the nomination.

Ted Cruz has said he is ending his presidential campaign after suffering a defeat to Donald Trump in Indiana. Bernie Sanders is projected to have won the Democratic vote. Cruz announced late Tuesday that he no longer had a viable route to victory, amid cries of shock and disappointment from supporters. “From the beginning, I’ve said that I would continue ... Read More »

Trump and Clinton assert dominance in key Northeast primaries

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have emerged the clear victors of Tuesday's primary races. Their rivals are already turning to the next contests in hopes of gaining ground. "Super Tuesday 3" - another key day of primaries that saw five states in the northeastern US heading to the polls - drew to a close with two figures casting their shadows over their opponents. Trump, the brash New York billionaire who has dominated headlines and split the Republican Party down the middle, swept Maryland, Delaware, Rhode Island, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. The business tycoon now has 77 percent of the delegates he needs to become the Republican presidential nominee. With 950 delegates to his name, he could, however, still fall short of the required 1,237. Clinton, meanwhile, asserted her lead over rival Bernie Sanders, even as he clinched a victory in Rhode Island. With four victories, she now has 90 percent of the delegates needed to see her become the first female nomination from a major party. Trump: 'the presumptive nominee'? Speaking to an audience of more than 1,000 people in Pennsylvania, Clinton called on voters to vote against the Republican candidates. "If you are a Democrat, an independent or a thoughtful Republican you know that their approach is not going to build an America where we increase opportunity or decrease inequality," she said. Trump, meanwhile, called himself "the presumptive nominee" during his speech in Manhattan, despite the fact he has yet to win all 1,237 delegates needed to win the nomination outright. His rivals, Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Ohio Governor John Kasich, are hoping to take the fight to the convention in June, where they'd still have a chance of winning their party's nomination. Regarding Clinton, Trump dismissed her as an honest candidate. "I call her 'Crooked Hillary,'" he said during his speech. Before the voting, he told reporters she was only taken seriously because of her gender. "Frankly, if Hillary Clinton were a man, I don't think she'd get five percent of the vote," he said. Sanders: truth-teller? Sanders, the other winner of Tuesday's primaries, gained little ground against Clinton, who currently has 1,618 delegates to Sanders' 1,267. In his speech at a rally in West Virginia, the Vermont senator, who has run on a platform critical of Wall Street and the corrupting influence of money in politics, showed no signs of giving up. "The reason that we are generating this enthusiasm is because we are doing something very unusual in contemporary politics. We are telling the truth," he said.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have emerged the clear victors of Tuesday’s primary races. Their rivals are already turning to the next contests in hopes of gaining ground. “Super Tuesday 3” – another key day of primaries that saw five states in the northeastern US heading to the polls – drew to a close with two figures casting their shadows ... Read More »

Bernie Sanders captures US state of Maine

Self-styled "democratic socialist" Bernie Sanders has won the northeastern state of Maine in the US presidential nomination contest. Frontrunner Hillary Clinton and Sanders faced off at a debate in Michigan. Vermont senator Bernie Sanders won his eighth contest Sunday after defeating rival Hillary Clinton in the Maine caucuses. That hands 74-year-old Sanders at least 14 of Maine's 25 delegates. Nearly 80 percent of precinct results reported that Sanders had won 64 percent of the vote with 36 percent supporting former US secretary of state Clinton. Sanders has continued to hammer at rival Clinton's advantage, winning the states of Kansas and Nebraska in Saturday's nominating contests. They will soon take the fight to the larger states of Michigan, Ohio and North Carolina. Sanders wrote in Sunday's Detroit Free Press that Clinton had supported "disastrous trade deals" such as the North American Free Trade Agreement and normalized trade relations with China resulting in thousands of job losses that devastated the manufacturing sector. "Not only did I vote against them," Sanders said, "I stood with workers on picket lines in opposition to them. Meanwhile, Secretary Clinton sided with corporate America and supported almost all of them." Clinton said during the Michigan debate in the city of Flint that there needs to be both "carrots and sticks" so that manufacturers invest in the US. Ahead of the July party convention, Clinton had at least 1,129 delegates if so-called "superdelegates" are included. It takes 2,383 delegates to win. But it remains unclear if the superdelegates would still support Clinton if she falls short of democratically elected delegates in state contests. In that scenario, her margin becomes much narrower leaving the Democratic nomination contest still in play. Democratic candidates face off in Michigan Both candidates devoted considerable time during the opening of the debate to the city's water crisis in which lead-tainted water was allowed to leech into the community's water system. Sanders and Clinton have been outspoken about the horror of the city's tainted water. Both have visited the city and called for a strong government response. Sanders called for the resignation of Republican Governor Rick Snyder of Michigan, over his handling of the health crisis. Clinton responded: "Amen to that." Marco Rubio scoops up Puerto Rico On the Republican side, Florida Senator Marco Rubio collected all 23 of Puerto Rico's delegates Sunday after posting a huge win in the US territory. But he still lags far behind rivals real estate mogul Donald Trump and Texas Senator Ted Cruz. The latest tally gives Trump the lead with 384 delegates. Cruz is in second place with 300 and Rubio trails in third with 151. Ohio Governor John Kasich, who has yet to win a single state contest, has 37. It takes 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination for president. Republican presidential candidates have steered clear of the Michigan city of Flint on the campaign trail.

Self-styled “democratic socialist” Bernie Sanders has won the northeastern state of Maine in the US presidential nomination contest. Frontrunner Hillary Clinton and Sanders faced off at a debate in Michigan. Vermont senator Bernie Sanders won his eighth contest Sunday after defeating rival Hillary Clinton in the Maine caucuses. That hands 74-year-old Sanders at least 14 of Maine’s 25 delegates. Nearly ... Read More »

Scroll To Top