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G20: Merkel calls on Putin to free Ukrainian sailors

On the sidelines of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, the German chancellor called for the release of Ukrainian sailors seized by Russia last weekend. Putin called Kyiv's ruling party a "party of war." German Chancellor Angela Merkel had an "in-depth" conversation with Russian President Vladimir Putin over the worsening tensions between Moscow and Kyiv, her spokesman Steffen Seibert said on Saturday. Merkel joined French President Emmanuel Macron, who also met Putin separately on the sidelines of the G20 summit of the world's biggest economies in Argentina, in demanding the release of the Ukrainian sailors captured by Russia's navy last weekend. Putin insisted their cases would be dealt with by the courts. Russia captured several Ukrainian navy vessels on Sunday in the Kerch Strait, which links the Sea of Azov and the Black Sea. The area is located off the Crimean Peninsula, a territory Moscow annexed from Ukraine in 2014. At a press conference later on Saturday, Putin said Ukraine was not interested in a peaceful resolution to the conflict and called the governing party in Kyiv a "party of war." "As long as it's in power, tragedies of this type and the war will continue," Putin added. Moscow insisted the boats had illegally crossed into Russian waters, while Kyiv filed a complaint in the European Court of Human Rights over what it said was Russian aggression. During her talks with Putin, Merkel pushed for "freedom of shipping into the Sea of Azov." The two leaders agreed to initiate talks between Germany, France, Russia, and Ukraine to reduce tensions in the region. Kyiv, which also accuses Russia of supporting separatist rebels in eastern Ukraine, declared martial law following the incident and banned Russian men between 16 and 60 from entering the country. Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said Saturday that the "Kremlin is further testing the strength of the global order" to see if the international community will allow Russia to assert that the Sea of Azov and the Black Sea are Russian territorial waters. Read more: Ukraine denies entry to 100 Russians as tension with Moscow escalates Hopeful that trade tensions will subside Merkel also said she hoped talks between the United States and China would help resolve trade tensions between the two countries. Merkel met with Chinese President Xi Jinping and they discussed both trade and partnership. US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are due to meet later Saturday on the sidelines of the summit. The chancellor said all countries are "affected indirectly when Chinese-American economic relations are not as frictionless as a world order requires." Trump, meanwhile, has canceled a planned meeting with Putin because of the latest standoff with Ukraine. Merkel also spoke of the need to reform the world body that regulates international trade disputes, which was raised during the G20 talks. "Everyone is in agreement that the WTO (World Trade Organization) should be reformed. That is an important agreement," she told reporters. Merkel also held talks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Concerns are rising that the two-day G20 summit — which represents more than 80 percent of the world's economy and global trade — would end on Sunday without a final communique, due to a number of US objections, including statements over trade, migration and climate change.

On the sidelines of the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, the German chancellor called for the release of Ukrainian sailors seized by Russia last weekend. Putin called Kyiv’s ruling party a “party of war.” German Chancellor Angela Merkel had an “in-depth” conversation with Russian President Vladimir Putin over the worsening tensions between Moscow and Kyiv, her spokesman Steffen Seibert said ... Read More »

Bahrain heads to polls amid opposition boycott

The country's opposition groups have been barred from taking part in the parliamentary election, with authorities arresting a number of activists. Rights groups expressed concerns over Bahrain's "political suppression." Bahrainis are casting their ballots in a parliamentary election that has been dubbed a "farce" by opposition groups and many rights organizations. The polls opened at 8 a.m. local time (0500 UTC) and will close at 8 p.m. (1700 UTC) on Saturday. The Shiite al-Wefaq and the secular Waad parties were banned from fielding candidates in the controversial elections, prompting calls from other opposition groups to boycott the polls. Officials say that 293 candidates, including 41 women, are running for parliament. King Hamad urged voters to participate in the election, which coincides with a municipal vote. Crackdown on dissidents In the run-up to the election, Bahraini authorities arrested at least six people for "obstructing the electoral process." Those detained and charged included Ali Rashed al-Asheeri, a former lawmaker with al-Wefaq party, according to the UK-based Bahrain Institute for Rights and Democracy. Al-Wefaq called for a boycott of the polls after the government passed a law in June barring "leaders and members of political associations dissolved for violating the kingdom's constitution or its laws" from standing. Human rights watchdog Amnesty International said Friday it was "gravely concerned" over political suppression in the tiny Gulf kingdom. "Over the past two years, the crackdown in Bahrain has seen the political opposition detained, intimidated and silenced," said Devin Kenney, the group's Bahrain researcher. "We call on the authorities to stop this ongoing and escalating repression and to allow free expression of dissenting voices, including those who oppose monarchy," he added. Protracted instability Bahrain, where a Sunni minority rules over a Shiite majority, has been rocked by unrest since authorities backed by reinforcements from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates carried out a bloody crackdown on Arab Spring protests in 2011. Bahrain accuses Iran of fomenting Shiite armed opposition amid a spate of attacks on security forces and infrastructure. On November 4, a Bahrain appeals court sentenced Sheikh Ali Salman, the head of al-Wefaq movement, to life in prison for spying for regional rival Qatar. He had been acquitted by Bahrain's High Criminal Court in June alongside two prominent aides, Sheikh Hassan Ali Juma Sultan and Ali Mahdi Ali al-Aswad, who were tried in absentia. Bahrain is strategically located in the Persian Gulf, and is home to the US Navy's Fifth Fleet and a British naval base.

The country’s opposition groups have been barred from taking part in the parliamentary election, with authorities arresting a number of activists. Rights groups expressed concerns over Bahrain’s “political suppression.” Bahrainis are casting their ballots in a parliamentary election that has been dubbed a “farce” by opposition groups and many rights organizations. The polls opened at 8 a.m. local time (0500 ... Read More »

Brexit: Britain’s Theresa May holds pre-summit talks

British Prime Minister Theresa May is to hold talks with key EU leaders ahead of a summit to endorse her Brexit deal. But resistance at home and abroad continues to dog negotiations. British Prime Minister Theresa May is to hold last-minute talks with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and European Council President Donald Tusk on the eve of an EU summit that could still be blocked by Spanish objections to her deal on Britain's withdrawal from the bloc. Spain has threatened to veto the deal unless the wording is changed to give Madrid guarantees that it alone can decide on the future of the disputed territory of Gibraltar in direct talks with London. May hopes nonetheless to leave Brussels on Sunday with the terms of British withdrawal on March 29 and a comprehensive concept for future Britain-EU relations settled with the bloc. Northern Irish opposition The British premier is, however, also facing opposition closer to home, with the Democratic Union Party (DUP) of Northern Ireland, whose support is vital to her government, holding a conference on Saturday. The right-wing and "Christian fundamentalist" DUP, which is in favor of Brtish rule in Northern Ireland, believes that the deal's backstop provision to ensure an open border on the island of Ireland will give the province a different economic status compared with the mainland. This, it fears, could increase the chances of Irish unification, which it vigorously rejects. Getting the DUP on board will be highly important to May if the deal is to be passed by the British Parliament, where May's Conservative Party only has a minority. The Conservatives have a "confidence-and-supply" arrangement with the DUP's 10 members of parliament, allowing them an effective majority. No-deal warning The expected presence of Britain's finance minister, Philip Hammond, at Saturday's conference underlines the central role the highly conservative party now plays. Hammond on Saturday reiterated his support for May's draft deal on Saturday, telling broadcaster BBC that it was "a way of Britain leaving the European Union ... with minimum negative impact on our economy." At the same time, he warned that no deal would mean "very serious" consequences in the future for the economy, jobs and prosperity. The conference will also be attended by former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, a vehement critic of the deal, and Fabian Picardo, the chief minister of Gibraltar.

British Prime Minister Theresa May is to hold talks with key EU leaders ahead of a summit to endorse her Brexit deal. But resistance at home and abroad continues to dog negotiations. British Prime Minister Theresa May is to hold last-minute talks with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and European Council President Donald Tusk on the eve of an EU ... Read More »

German nurse accused of dozens of murders apologizes

Niels Högel is on trial for the suspected murder of 100 patients in two different hospitals. After his complete confession on opening day, he has now apologized to the relatives of his victims. A German nurse who is accused of having murdered more than 100 patients is being tried again by a court in Oldenburg, in the state of Lower Saxony. According to investigators, 41-year old Niels Högel intentionally injected patients with doses of medicine liable to cause cardiac arrest, so that he could then attempt to revive them and impress his colleagues. Högel's killing spree is one of the most serious cases of mass murder in post-war German history. On Thursday, during a hearing of the trial which began three weeks ago, Högel apologized to the victims' families, and said if there was anything he could do to help them right now, he would. "I am fully convinced now that I owe every relative an explanation," he told the court. "I am honestly sorry." He also said at the time of the murders, the killings had not affected him emotionally: "I didn't feel grief in that sense," he said. Germany's biggest killing spree The killings allegedly took place in the hospitals of Oldenburg and Delmenhorst, two towns in Lower Saxony, between 2000 and 2005. The youngest of his victims was 34 years old and the oldest was 96. Högel was already sentenced to life in prison in 2015 for six other crimes, including the murder of two patients and the attempted murder of two more. After the sentencing, the police continued to investigate and determined that the number of possible victims was much higher. Investigators suspect Högel could have killed more than 200 people, but they fear they might never find out because many of the possible victims were cremated. Police have exhumed 130 bodies of people who died while Högel was on shift. Investigators discovered traces of substances like potassium, Solatex and Gilurytmal (medicines used to control abnormal heart rhythms) or lidocaine (an anesthetic) in the exhumed bodies. Investigators have described the case as "unprecedented in Germany" to their knowledge. Högel's admission of guilt On the first day of the new trial, Högel stunned the courtroom when he admitted to all 100 suspected murders. Högel said he had previously not spoken about the murders "out of shame" and because it had taken him a long time to come to terms with how many people he had killed. While he was working at the two hospitals, Högel had gained a reputation as a jinx because so many patients had to be resuscitated or died under his watch. The hospital in Oldenberg had tried to get him to leave and wrote him positive letters of recommendation, but despite the suspicious number of deaths, a formal investigation was never opened. Högel continued to kill even when he moved to the new hospital in Delmenhorst, where he was finally caught in the act in 2005. The trial is expected to last until May 2019.

Niels Högel is on trial for the suspected murder of 100 patients in two different hospitals. After his complete confession on opening day, he has now apologized to the relatives of his victims. A German nurse who is accused of having murdered more than 100 patients is being tried again by a court in Oldenburg, in the state of Lower ... Read More »

US welcomes German firms’ compliance on Iran sanctions

US Ambassador to Germany Grenell has welcomed German companies' decision to comply with US sanctions and stop business with Iran. Washington warned firms that do business with Iran that they could face repercussions. The US ambassador to Berlin on Thursday said he was pleased with the actions of German companies that had stopped trading with Iran after fresh US sanctions were imposed on the country. "We are very pleased that German businesses have decided to abide by the US sanctions," Grenell told the German news agency DPA in an interview. "German business leaders have told us unequivocally that they will stop doing business with Iran and will abide by the US sanctions," he said. "So we are very pleased that the actions of the German business community have been very clear." The US reimposed sanctions on Iranian oil this month after US President Donald Trump pulled out of an international agreement on Iran's nuclear program. Trump claimed the deal was flawed because it did not include restrictions on the development of ballistic missiles or Iran's support for militant groups in countries such as Iraq, Lebanon, Syria and Yemen. Officials from the European Union and Iran have worked to create a new legal framework to protect companies that conduct business with Iran from US sanctions. While praising some German firms in his DPA interview, Grenell accused those still doing business in Iran of helping to fund terrorist activities. "If you are doing business with Iran, you are giving money to the Iranian regime, which spends massive amounts of money on terrorist activities," Grenell said. Firms running a risk Two rounds of US sanctions, the first in August and a subsequent one this month — targeting a broad range of industries and individuals — have been introduced, posing a dilemma for German and other European firms. Businesses that breach the US sanctions risk being hit by secondary sanctions, including being barred from access to the US financial system. Europe, China and Russia have criticized the US withdrawal from the nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), to which they are also parties. The JCPOA was signed by Iran, China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, Germany, the EU and the United States in October 2015.

US Ambassador to Germany Grenell has welcomed German companies’ decision to comply with US sanctions and stop business with Iran. Washington warned firms that do business with Iran that they could face repercussions. The US ambassador to Berlin on Thursday said he was pleased with the actions of German companies that had stopped trading with Iran after fresh US sanctions ... Read More »

Do sanctions against Russia work?

The European Union is mulling its own Magnitsky Act — meaning more pressure on Russia. Time to ask what impact current US and EU sanctions have had on the creaking Russian economy so far. The Dutch government has held talks with EU member states aimed at establishing an EU sanctions regime against Russia based on human rights violations, which is known as an EU Magnitsky Act, adding to existing sanctions. "It appears to have momentum and is going forward," Bill Browder, who has campaigned for the legislation known as the Magnistky Act in the US, told DW. "If successful, this would have a devastating effect on Putin and his cronies because they keep a huge amount of their money and property in the EU." But will it? EU sanctions were established in March 2014 after Russia's encroachment in Ukraine and have been in force since. Reviewed every six month by the European Council, they are now in place until January 31, 2019, and include asset freezing, an import ban on items from the Crimea and Sevastopol and a ban on tourism to the same areas. The US State Department said two weeks ago Washington intended to impose a new round of sanctions on Russia. The US already slapped Russia with more sanctions in August following the March attack on ex-Russian intelligence agent Sergei Skripal in the UK. The intended effect is to exert pressure on the Russians and undermine President Vladimir Putin's ambitious foreign policy without damaging other global economies. Mixed effects Sanctions have knocked 6 percent off Russia's GDP since 2014, a Bloomberg report noted recently. The GDP of the "world's biggest energy exporter" is now 10 percent smaller than might have been expected at the end of 2013, before the Crimea crisis, it said. Lower oil prices have hit the economy, but sanctions are the "bigger culprit," the report said, adding that Russia's economy is over 10 percent smaller compared with what might have been expected at the end of 2013. Growth has been sluggish at 1-2 percent in the last two years. The International Monetary Fund recently predicted the Russian economy would grow by 1.7 percent in 2018 and 1.8 percent in 2019. Russia has done much to insulate itself from sanctions, but the government's forecasts of growth of over 3 percent by 2021 are in doubt. Western sanctions have played a key factor over the past four years, the study by Bloomberg Economics said. "Part of the gap is likely to reflect the enduring impact of sanctions both imposed and threatened over the last five years," Scott Johnson, an analyst at Bloomberg Economics, said. Inflation-targeting But the 6 percent gap is also due to other factors, such as the central bank's inflation-targeting strategy and the pessimism that has hit most emerging markets. ''In a short term, the impact of oil prices is much more important for Russia than any sanctions,'' said Sergey Khestanov, a professor at the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA) . Oil income makes up 40 percent of federal budget revenues and is trading at its highest level in more than four years. Russia has also been helped by the collapse in the ruble, which has boosted export revenues. Russian economy adjusts The Bank of Russia said this week it expected the impact of possible new US sanctions on Russia's economy would be smaller than it was in 2014-2015. "We are not willing to argue that all the negative effects [of possible new sanctions], which we may face, will affect us in a painless manner, and that it will not have any impact on the Russian economy," the director of the bank's Research and Forecasting Department, Alexander Morozov, said in a statement. "This is certainly not the case. But the effect cannot be overestimated since in most of the scenarios it will be much less than the one we observed in 2014-2015." Countereffects One side effect has been to induce the central bank to create reserves, making the Russian economy more stable after the Finance Ministry introduced a fiscal rule protecting the economy from fluctuations in oil prices. The other factor is of course political. Sanctions have so far failed to dislodge Putin or create much of a dent in his hold on power.

The European Union is mulling its own Magnitsky Act — meaning more pressure on Russia. Time to ask what impact current US and EU sanctions have had on the creaking Russian economy so far. The Dutch government has held talks with EU member states aimed at establishing an EU sanctions regime against Russia based on human rights violations, which is ... Read More »

Britain’s MI5 missed ‘opportunities’ to prevent Manchester terror attack

A parliamentary committee has criticized MI5 and London police for failing to adequately deal with Salman Abedi. The British citizen killed 22 people when he detonated explosives outside an Ariana Grande concert. The British parliament's Intelligence Security Committee on Thursday published a damning report on the 2017 Manchester Arena terror attack. The report said British security services failed to adequately deal with 22-year-old perpetrator Salman Abedi's case and, as such, missed several opportunities to possibly prevent the attack. It also noted that security services did not heed suggestions provided in previous reports on terror attacks in the UK. "While it impossible to say whether these would have prevented the devastating attack on May 22, we have concluded that, as a result of the failings, potential opportunities to prevent it were missed," said British lawmaker Dominic Grieve, who chairs the committee. Twenty-two people were killed exiting a concert by American singer Ariana Grande at the Manchester Arena when Abedi, a British citizen born to Libyan parents, detonated shrapnel-laden explosives. Shortcomings Security services, including the UK's domestic intelligence agency, MI5, and London's Metropolitan Police Counter-Terrorism unit, had flagged Abedi as early as 2010. MI5 also briefly investigated him in 2014, but did not recommend his case to a counter-extremism program. The report singled out both security services for not following up with Abedi after he visited an extremist contact in prison. The failure to monitor Abedi after the prison visit allowed him to "return undetected" to Britain after a brief trip to Libya, it added. The case was reminiscent of German security service's treatment of Anis Amri, a Tunisian national and failed asylum seeker who drove a lorry into a Christmas market crowd, killing 12 people and injuring dozens more. Amri managed to elude German law enforcement despite once being described as a security risk. Although he told a federal police informant that he "wanted to do something big" and could acquire an AK-47 assault rifle to commit an attack, a brief investigation resulted in him being deemed an "unlikely" threat. 'An attack is highly likely' Interior Minister Sajid Javid thanked the committee for the report, noting that "we will review and formally respond to it in due course." "Following the attacks, the government, police and MI5 undertook a series of rigorous reviews to ensure we are all doing everything we can to tackle the evolving threat of terrorism," said Javid. The UK's perceived terror threat level is currently defined as "severe," meaning "an attack is highly likely." It hasn't been lower then severe since 2014.

A parliamentary committee has criticized MI5 and London police for failing to adequately deal with Salman Abedi. The British citizen killed 22 people when he detonated explosives outside an Ariana Grande concert. The British parliament’s Intelligence Security Committee on Thursday published a damning report on the 2017 Manchester Arena terror attack. The report said British security services failed to adequately ... Read More »

Germany issuing travel bans to 18 Saudis over Khashoggi’s death

Germany is banning 18 Saudi citizens suspected of being involved in Jamal Khashoggi's death from entering Europe's Schengen zone. The government says it is also halting previously approved arms exports to Saudi Arabia. Germany has triggered proceedings to ban 18 Saudi citizens allegedly involved in the murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi from entering Europe's border-free Schengen zone, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said on Monday. "We still have more questions than answers in the Khashoggi case," Maas said on the sidelines of a European Union meeting in Brussels, adding that he had discussed the decision with Britain and France prior to his announcement. The Schengen Area comprises 26 European countries. It includes most EU countries and non-EU members Norway and Switzerland. A German Foreign Ministry spokeswoman told the Reuters news agency that Germany's privacy laws precluded her from naming the individuals. Arms sales on ice In another move in response to the killing, the German Economy Ministry said on Monday that it had halted all arms sales to the kingdom, even those previously approved. A month ago, Germany said it would not give the green light to any new weapons sales to Saudi Arabia, but did not say what would happen with contracts that had already received approval. The decision to halt exports is likely to affect the delivery of 20 patrol boats that are already under construction in the eastern state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Other EU member states, and notably France, have so far declined to halt arms sales to Saudi Arabia. Saudi dithering Khashoggi was killed while visiting the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on October 2. His body was dismembered and removed. Germany and the European Union have repeatedly called on Saudi authorities to clarify the circumstances of Khashoggi's death. Riyadh initially denied that he had been killed. But amid growing international pressure, it accused 11 rogue agents of carrying out the killing without its consent. Doubts remain however about the complicity of Saudi leaders. On Saturday, US media reported that the US Central Intelligence Agency believed with "high confidence" that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman directly ordered the killing. Germany announced it would stop selling weapons to Saudi Arabia in late October until the full facts of Khashoggi's death were "on the table."

Germany is banning 18 Saudi citizens suspected of being involved in Jamal Khashoggi’s death from entering Europe’s Schengen zone. The government says it is also halting previously approved arms exports to Saudi Arabia. Germany has triggered proceedings to ban 18 Saudi citizens allegedly involved in the murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi from entering Europe’s border-free Schengen zone, German Foreign ... Read More »

Yemeni government confirms participation at peace talks

The government backed by Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries has said it will send delegates to UN-backed peace talks. The last set of peace talks in September failed after Houthi rebels failed to show up. The Saudi Arabia-backed government of Yemen confirmed on Monday that it would take part in peace talks sponsored by the United Nations. The government also called on the UN to "pressure" Yemen's Houthi rebels to attend the talks without conditions. The announcement coincided with a speech by Saudi Arabia's King Salman in which he reiterated his country's support for the UN efforts to end the war. The Iran-backed Houthis have fought a three-and-a-half-year-war with the Yemeni government and an alliance of Arab countries led by Saudi Arabia UN envoy Martin Griffiths is set to travel to Yemen finalize arrangements for peace talks in Sweden. Both sides had previously given "firm assurances" to him that they would attend. On Sunday, Houthi leader Mohammed Ali al-Houthi called on rebel fighters to stop attacks against the Saudi-led coalition and said the group was ready for a ceasefire. Attempts to hold peace talks in September failed after Houthi representatives failed to show up. Fighting has intensified recently around the port city of Hodeida, sparking fears that millions could face starvation in the event of a blockade. More than 10,000 people have died in the war, according to official figures, but activists say the actual death toll could be far higher.

The government backed by Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries has said it will send delegates to UN-backed peace talks. The last set of peace talks in September failed after Houthi rebels failed to show up. The Saudi Arabia-backed government of Yemen confirmed on Monday that it would take part in peace talks sponsored by the United Nations. The government ... Read More »

Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn arrested over financial misconduct

The Nissan chairman has been arrested on suspicion of falsifying financial reports. Brazilian-born Carlos Ghosn has rescued the Japanese automaker from near bankruptcy over the last 18 years. Nissan Motor Company said on Monday it was moving to fire its high-flying chairman, Carlos Ghosn, from his post after he was arrested for using company money for personal use and engaging in other serious acts of misconduct. Ghosn, who heads the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance, was arrested in Tokyo on violation of financial regulations including misreporting his income. Shares in French carmaker Renault plunged as much as 12 percent as the news of his alleged misconduct broke - Renault's lowest level in about four years. Nissan said the violations were discovered during an investigation over several months that was instigated by a whistleblower. Fall from grace Ghosn's arrrest has shocked the auto industry, and comes just five months after he narrowly won a shareholder vote at Renault over his 7.4 million euro ($8.5 million) pay package for 2017, after losing a 2016 vote. His compensation package was criticized by Emmanuel Macron during his stint as France's economy minister. The 64-year-old helped turn the carmaker back from the brink of financial ruin 17 years ago and turned it into a global powerhouse, pushing it into electric cars. The allegations also involve Nissan's representative director Greg Kelly. Strong resentment and disappointment Nissan's CEO, Hiroto Saikawa, said the board will meet on Thursday to vote on dismissing both Ghosn and Kelly. He identified three types of serious conduct: under-reporting income, using investment funds for personal gain and illicit use of company expenses. "This is an act that cannot be tolerated by the company," he said during a news briefing. The Nissan CEO said the scandal would not affect the automaker's alliance with Renault and Mitsubishi. "The partnership among the three entities will not be affected by this event, rather we will closely work together with all the partners to contain any possible confusion." Saikawa said the wrongdoing was serious and unacceptable and had gone on for years, without giving further details. "To have so greatly violated the trust of many, I feel full of disappointment and regret." French vigilance France's President Emmanuel Macron said his country would be extremely vigilant about the fate of Renault and its alliance with Nissan after Monday's events. Macron said that the French state, as a Renault shareholder, "will be extremely vigilant to the stability of the alliance and the group."

The Nissan chairman has been arrested on suspicion of falsifying financial reports. Brazilian-born Carlos Ghosn has rescued the Japanese automaker from near bankruptcy over the last 18 years. Nissan Motor Company said on Monday it was moving to fire its high-flying chairman, Carlos Ghosn, from his post after he was arrested for using company money for personal use and engaging ... Read More »

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