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Italian coastguard rescues thousands of refugees

Officers have rescued 5,700 migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean in the last two days, the Italian coastguard said. They also recovered 14 bodies of refugees who drowned while crossing over from Libya. The coastguard coordinated 20 rescue operations over the weekend, intercepting about 2,400 people. Around 3,300 more migrants disembarked in five different ports in Sicily over the two days, the ANSA news agency reported. Rescue workers also saved over 460 migrants who arrived in Naples on Sunday, but it was not clear if those rescued had been accounted for in prior counts, local interior minister Gerarda Pantalone told reporters. "I've never had a SAR [Search and Rescue] like it. We were in the process of transferring 1,000 migrants from the Okyroe [tanker] to the Siem Pilot when suddenly, in the dark, rubber boats appeared. It looked hopeless," Pal Erik Teigen, the police officer in charge of the rescue operation, told reporters on Sunday. The Italian coastguard said it recovered seven dead bodies on Friday and another seven the next day. Around 25 people were still missing and were feared drowned after the Libyan coastguard attacked a migrant dinghy during a rescue operation. Rescue workers of the German navy also saved 844 people in the weekend's operation together with the Italians. The refugees were being brought to an Italian harbor aboard the support ship Werra. The German military has been participating in the action, called Operation Sophia, since 2015. Italy is the main landing point for migrants who travel from North Africa and undertake a perilous voyage in flimsy vessels over the Mediterranean Sea to reach Europe. These boats are often overcrowded, and passengers are exposed to exhaust fumes or suffer from hypothermia or dehydration. According to the International Institute of Migration (IOM), 146,381 migrants have landed in Italy so far this year. Around 3,645 refugees have died on the journey. Meanwhile, Rome has been engaged in a row with the European Commission on funding for the refugees. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi complained about the lack of solidarity from EU partners. "We cannot go on like this, we need a radical solution," he said on a visit to Sicily over the weekend. He also insisted on a fine to penalize Eastern European nations that refused to take in migrants.

Officers have rescued 5,700 migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean in the last two days, the Italian coastguard said. They also recovered 14 bodies of refugees who drowned while crossing over from Libya. The coastguard coordinated 20 rescue operations over the weekend, intercepting about 2,400 people. Around 3,300 more migrants disembarked in five different ports in Sicily over the two ... Read More »

Cameroon rescuers continue to search for bodies after train crash

Rescue teams are struggling to pull bodies from a derailed train wreck in southwest Cameroon, two days after the crash killed more than 70 people. Several carriages fell into a ravine, crushing passengers to death. Rescuers were focused on the ravine where four of the wagons plunged when the overcrowded train, traveling from Yaounde to the port city of Douala, derailed on Friday near the southwestern town of Eseka. Recovery teams were struggling to extract bodies intact, as many were trapped under the carriages, some of which fell on top of each other, Radio France International (RFI) reported on Sunday. Nationwide grief Cameroon's President Paul Biya put the death toll at more than 70, describing how another 600 passengers had been injured in the crash, about 120 kilometers (75 miles) from the capital, Yaounde. "I instructed the government to provide full assistance to the survivors, while investigations will be made to determine the cause of the derailment," he said. Biya declared a national day of mourning for the victims on Monday. The Associated Press news agency described how several bodies remained strewn along the tracks two days after the crash. Train overloaded The 20-carriage train, which was carrying 1,300 passengers - more than double its load capacity - derailed as, one by one, wagons detached themselves from the convoy. A larger number of passengers were traveling on the train due to the collapse of a section of the main highway between Yaounde and Douala earlier in the day. Witnesses, including a reporter for the Reuters news agency travelling on the train, said rail workers had added additional carriages to accommodate extra passengers before its departure, though it is not clear if that decision contributed to the accident. The rail company, Camrail, rejected complaints from victims' families that they had been abandoned, stressing that crisis centers had been set up in the two cities. Psychological support was being provided to families, RFI cited a Camrail representative as saying. Engineers were at the scene on Sunday to evaluate the damage and the rail tracks were expected to resume operations soon, according to a rail transportation official.

Rescue teams are struggling to pull bodies from a derailed train wreck in southwest Cameroon, two days after the crash killed more than 70 people. Several carriages fell into a ravine, crushing passengers to death. Rescuers were focused on the ravine where four of the wagons plunged when the overcrowded train, traveling from Yaounde to the port city of Douala, ... Read More »

Over 1 million Russians could be surveillance targets by year’s end

Russian activists claim Moscow is drastically expanding its electronic eavesdropping at home. A new report alleges the country's wiretapping efforts on its own citizens have doubled in recent years. Over a million Russians could soon have their phone conversations monitored by the government, according to data released by Russian political activists. In the first Russian-language edition of "The Red Web: The Struggle between Russia's Digital Dictators and the New Online Revolutionaries" published Friday in Moscow, investigative journalists Andrei Soldatov and Irina Borogan allege the number of wiretap requests granted by Russian courts has doubled in the last eight years. The journalists say records published by the Russian court system show that between 2007 and 2015, the number of court-sanctioned eavesdropping operations climbed from 265,937 to 539,964. Other activists claim the number could be much higher. Figures published by journalist Oleg Solmanov earlier this month indicate that almost 1 million Russian citizens were wiretapped so far this year. The activists say many Russian citizens targeted by government wiretapping programs are the subjects of legitimate criminal investigations. However, they say opposition politicians, political activists and even businessmen increasingly find themselves targeted by government surveillance operations. Opposition politician Boris Nemtsov tried to investigate to what extent he was targeted by Kremlin-sanctioned spying efforts, but he made little headway before his murder last year. Speaking to DW, "The Red Web" co-author Irina Borogan says the lack of legal checks on wiretapping powers are encouraging abuse among government investigators. She says a member of Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), the main successor to the Soviet Union's KGB, only needs to file a report requesting eavesdropping operations in order to secure permission. "Russia is an authoritarian state, which is starting to resemble a police state with the government constantly pushing for more surveillance of everyday people," Borogan said. The 2014 annexation of the Crimean Peninsula by Russia kicked off a renaissance of sorts for Moscow's intelligence services, according to Borogan, increasing both the number of intelligence operations carried out by the government and raising concerns among the country's elite. "Average Russians don't pay attention to [government] wiretapping," she said. "Authoritarian states give people space. If you're not a politician or a business man but a school teacher or an office worker, you can get used to the system. But opposition politicians, businessmen and journalists are worried." Private email accounts also at risk Electronic surveillance is increasingly a concern among politically engaged Russians. Last week, dozens of journalists and activists claimed they received warnings from Google that an unknown third party had attempted to access their email accounts without permission. Ilja Klishin, an editor at Russia's independent TV Rain website, posted a screenshot he claims he was sent indicating intelligence agencies had attempted to break his password. "It's possible members of the intelligence service are trying to steal your password," it reads. He is just one of dozens of journalist who have taken to social media to complain about the attempt to break their passwords. DW reached out to Google Russia, who declined to comment on the specifics of the case, saying only that "the emergency warning system does not necessarily mean a breach attempt was made, but indicates that the company believes one took place." The company added the system "warns users when a third party attempts to violate their account" but it cannot be "100 percent certain the accounts were targeted." Expats also under pressure But email warnings like the ones sent to Google Russia users last week are all too familiar to one former English teacher from the United States who spoke to DW. "I got a couple of warnings that someone was trying to change my passwords and then my students told me that FSB agents were hanging around after class," he said, adding the authorities were interested in what he was teaching the students, particularly on political and economic topics. Eventually, the teacher said he was picked up by three agents who wanted to know what he was doing in Russia. "They didn't threaten me but I was scared all the same," he said. "I mean, I was just teaching. I don't know why spies would be interested in me. They kept trying to find out if I had any connections to the military back home and said I should meet with them regularly to talk about other Americans in Russia." He says he declined the request but said the agents had some parting advice: "They told me I shouldn't contact [the American] embassy. He said they could tell if I tried."

Russian activists claim Moscow is drastically expanding its electronic eavesdropping at home. A new report alleges the country’s wiretapping efforts on its own citizens have doubled in recent years. Over a million Russians could soon have their phone conversations monitored by the government, according to data released by Russian political activists. In the first Russian-language edition of “The Red Web: ... Read More »

Ecuador cuts internet for Assange, says WikiLeaks

WikiLeaks has activated "contingency plans" after its founder lost internet access. The alleged move by the Ecuadorian Embassy comes as the anti-secrecy organization ramps up its campaign on Hillary Clinton. WikiLeaks on Monday said the Ecuadorian Embassy in London had cut internet access for Julian Assange, the whistleblowing organization's founder and editor-in-chief. "We can confirm Ecuador cut off Assange's internet access Saturday, 5 p.m. GMT, shortly after publication of [Hillary] Clinton's Goldman Sachs speeches," the organization noted on social platform Twitter. "We have activated the appropriate contingency plans," WikiLeaks said in an earlier tweet. A spokesperson for the organization, speaking with the AFP news agency, claimed the cutoff was directly linked to WikiLeaks' ongoing publications concerning US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Days before the Democratic National Convention in July, WikiLeaks published damning internal emails that revealed a concerted effort to undermine the presidential campaign of Clinton's competitor, Senator Bernie Sanders. Democratic Party officials and the Clinton campaign have accused Russia of involvement in a series of hacks on the American political party's servers, including "senior-most officials." However, the anti-secrecy organization has refused to disclose the sources of the hacked material. The Ecuadorian Embassy in London has declined to comment on the development, according to news agencies. Assange has lived at the embassy since 2012. He received asylum at Ecuador's diplomatic presence in the UK after a British court ordered him extradited to Sweden for questioning over sex crimes allegations. WikiLeaks' latest publications concern Clinton's paid speeches to financial giant Goldman Sachs.

WikiLeaks has activated “contingency plans” after its founder lost internet access. The alleged move by the Ecuadorian Embassy comes as the anti-secrecy organization ramps up its campaign on Hillary Clinton. WikiLeaks on Monday said the Ecuadorian Embassy in London had cut internet access for Julian Assange, the whistleblowing organization’s founder and editor-in-chief. “We can confirm Ecuador cut off Assange’s internet ... Read More »

Constitutional court allows postponement of Congo election to 2018

Congo's constitutional court has approved a request by the electoral commission to postpone the November election to update voter lists. The controversial move means President Kabila could stay in office until 2018. Congo's ruling People's Party for Reconstruction and Democracy (PPRD) and other participants in a national dialogue agreed on Monday that presidential, legislative and provincial elections will be held in April 2018. The national dialogue - which began on September 1 between the PPRD, representatives of civil society and some of the opposition to try to find a way forward - has been attacked by the opposition and foreign bodies as enabling President Joseph Kabila to stay in office beyond his constitutionally prescribed two terms. Since winning independence from Belgium in 1960, Congo has never had a peaceful, democratic transition of power. Presidential, legislative and local elections will be held six months after they are convened on October 30, 2017, the former Togolese prime minister and talks facilitator Edem Kodjo said in a statement. The leader of the parliamentary group representing Kabila's PPRD confirmed the announcement. "The election will be held in 2018," Ramazani Shadari said, adding that "all the details" of the deal would be disclosed on Tuesday. The court said there were technical problems with the upcoming vote and authorized what its president, Benoit Lwamba Bindu said was a "reasonable delay." The commission must now publish a new electoral calendar for the presidential election, originally scheduled for November 27. Opposition coalition boycotts talks The commission originally filed a delay petition to the court in September amid clashes that left dozens dead in the capital after security forces clashed with thousands of anti-government demonstrators. It has since said elections cannot be organized until the end of 2018. A high court has said that Kabila can stay in office until a new leader is elected. The country's main opposition coalition - "Rassemblement" (Gathering) - boycotted the talks and has called for the international community and the United Nations to take an active role with the African Union in bringing about dialogue for holding elections. It has also called for a general strike on Wednesday across the vast central African nation, to give Kabila a "yellow card." EU foreign ministers on Monday said the bloc was "deeply concerned by the political situation [and] ... strongly condemns the acts of extreme violence."

Congo’s constitutional court has approved a request by the electoral commission to postpone the November election to update voter lists. The controversial move means President Kabila could stay in office until 2018. Congo’s ruling People’s Party for Reconstruction and Democracy (PPRD) and other participants in a national dialogue agreed on Monday that presidential, legislative and provincial elections will be held ... Read More »

EU governments unite behind urgent call to ‘save Aleppo’

The EU's foreign policy chief has said it is the bloc's top priority to save the besieged city of Aleppo. European leaders called out Russia for aiding the Syrian regime, but stopped short of proposing punitive action. United Nations Special Envoy Staffan de Mistura said he'd conveyed to European Union foreign ministers just how stark the scenario is right now at ground zero in Syria, the rebel-held city of Aleppo: "Between now and December," he said, "if we are not finding a solution for Aleppo, Aleppo will not be there anymore." De Mistura, who'd been invited to the ministerial meeting in Luxembourg by EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, said the rebel-held city had been bombed "for more than a month [with] no access to it" for humanitarian aid. Of the 275,000 inhabitants who have remained in the city despite the incessant air attacks, de Mistura said 100,000 were children. He urged the EU to unify and find a way to save these people. His words seemed to have an impact, as foreign ministers ended up approving a final statement more forceful than the language most had used on their ways into the meeting, perhaps stronger than many had thought could be mustered with unanimity: "Since the beginning of the offensive by the regime and its allies, notably Russia, the intensity and scale of the aerial bombardment of eastern Aleppo is clearly disproportionate and the deliberate targeting of hospitals, medical personnel, schools and essential infrastructure, as well as the use of barrel bombs, cluster bombs, and chemical weapons, constitute a catastrophic escalation of the conflict and have caused further widespread civilian casualties, including amongst women and children and may amount to war crimes," the statement read. EU 'appalled' by actions of regime 'and its allies' "Priority number one now is to save Aleppo, to save the people of Aleppo," Mogherini said. "Our strong call is on Russia and on the Syrian regime to stop the bombing on Aleppo and to continue talks with the US and other key players on the ground to avoid a …humanitarian catastrophe in the city." The document also calls on Russia to make all efforts to "halt indiscriminate bombing by the Syrian regime" - though without going so far as to mention Russia is doing much of the bombing itself - and demands "immediate and expanded humanitarian access" to besieged civilians. Will Russia respond? While ministers debated, the head of Russia's military general staff announced there would be a "humanitarian pause" on Thursday so that sick and wounded civilians could be evacuated. While Mogherini welcomed "anything that could alleviate the humanitarian suffering, the catastrophe that we're seeing in Aleppo," she also noted that UN humanitarian experts had said they'd need 12 hours to perform the needed rescues. As for whether being "appalled" by Russia's actions means EU governments are willing to consider punitive measures against Moscow, analysts aren't betting on it. So far only German Chancellor Angela Merkel - and only to one newspaper, "Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung" - has called for increased European Union sanctions against Russia for its actions in Syria. But it's unclear whether Merkel herself will be making that recommendation later this week at the leaders' summit in Brussels. Sanctions an option, but not one anyone wants Ben Nimmo, a senior fellow at London's Institute for Statecraft, isn't surprised the meeting resulted in mere condemnation rather than a proposal for more punitive measures. "The EU always finds it difficult to agree whether to be tough or encouraging on Russia," he said. "Some EU states look at Russia and see a problem, others look at it and see an opportunity, so they pull in opposite directions." Nimmo notes even the already complicated path to getting sanctions passed by the EU 28 is much harder now because of the raft of penalties currently in place on Russia. "The easy targets have already been sanctioned," Nimmo pointed out. Even if there were willingness among governments, he told DW, "agreeing on further measures would require a lot of debate as to what and who, exactly, should be sanctioned." Marc Pierini, who served as the EU ambassador to Syria, doesn't think battling over sanctions would be a productive use of EU might anyway, because the two men who could change the fate of Aleppo, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and Russian President Vladimir Putin, have no impetus to do so, regardless of EU ire. Now a visiting fellow at Carnegie Europe in Brussels, Pierini says the situation is basically stuck. "The regime cannot afford to lose Aleppo," Pierini said, and Russia will continue helping them do that, unless Putin sees that it's hurting him politically. But instead, Pierini explained, "domestically Putin is gaining from this kind of brutal image, so I don't have much hope."

The EU’s foreign policy chief has said it is the bloc’s top priority to save the besieged city of Aleppo. European leaders called out Russia for aiding the Syrian regime, but stopped short of proposing punitive action. United Nations Special Envoy Staffan de Mistura said he’d conveyed to European Union foreign ministers just how stark the scenario is right now ... Read More »

Cause of deadly explosion at BASF chemical plant in Ludwigshafen remains unclear

Investigators in the western German town of Ludwigshafen are still trying to determine the cause of the explosion at the BASF chemical plant. Two people were killed, two remain missing and six were severely injured. Following the severe explosion at the BASF chemical plant in Ludwigshafen on Monday, German authorities continued on Tuesday to investigate the cause of the blast which killed at least two employees. Officials said terrorism has been ruled out. "The fire has been extinguished," a spokesman for Ludwigshafen police said early on Tuesday, adding that the situation remains unclear. "It's difficult for the rescue workers to reach the scene of the accident," he said. Employees still missing Two other employees were still unaccounted for on Tuesday while another six were in hospital after suffering serious injuries. The explosion and fire on Monday occurred at around 11:30 a.m. local time (0930 UTC) at a river harbor, used to unload flammable liquids and liquid gas. Following the explosion, a pipeline that was undergoing repairs began spewing soot, BASF plant manager Uwe Liebelt told reporters. Several witnesses also posted videos on social media in which huge flames and plumes of thick black smoke were seen billowing from the plant. Residents in Ludwigshafen and the nearby city of Mannheim were told by police to stay indoors and suggested they close all windows and doors as it wasn't immediately clear which chemicals could be airborne. The city of Ludwigshafen reported on Twitter that residents located near the plant were complaining of "respiratory irritation." Damge levels unclear As a safety precaution, BASF also shut down 14 other production plants and erected water barriers between the northern inland port and the Rhine. The economic consequences and the damage levels remain unclear. The incident on Monday came just two years after Ludwigshafen was shaken by a devastating gas explosion, close to the BASF chemical plant. Gas transport company Gascade had been digging around a buried pipeline at the time of the blast. One excavation worker was killed and 20 other people were injured. Nearby houses and trees were burned to charcoal, leaving an entire neighborhood devastated. Authorities in Ludwigshafen have shared a telephone hotline for those directly affected by Monday's explosion: +49 62 157 086 000.

Investigators in the western German town of Ludwigshafen are still trying to determine the cause of the explosion at the BASF chemical plant. Two people were killed, two remain missing and six were severely injured. Following the severe explosion at the BASF chemical plant in Ludwigshafen on Monday, German authorities continued on Tuesday to investigate the cause of the blast ... Read More »

Second Scottish referendum in the works

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said it's "highly likely" that Scotland will secede from the United Kingdom in the near future. She said preparations for a second independence referendum are already underway. Sturgeon told members of her pro-independence Scottish National Party on Sunday that: "I have never doubted that Scotland will one day become an independent country and I believe it today more strongly than I ever have before." She further pledged to "explore all options" to prevent Scotland being taken out of the European Union against its will following the UK's decision to exit the bloc following this year's referendum in which a majority of Scots cast ballots to remain. The ruling SNP says it will present a bill for another referendum to the Scottish Parliament next week. It would be pursued if all other options to keep Scotland in the EU should fail. A referendum in 2014 over Scottish independence was rejected, but the SNP may be banking on fallout over the Brexit decision for a renewed push to sway Scottish voters to seek a future within the EU even if it means breaking up the United Kingdom. "We will propose new powers to help keep Scotland in the single market even if the UK leaves," Sturgeon said on Sunday, the final day of the SNP conference in Glasgow. "But if the Tory government rejects these efforts, if it insists on taking Scotland down a path that hurts our economy, costs jobs, lowers our living standards and damages our reputation as an open, welcoming, diverse country, then be in no doubt." Scottish independence movement's ripple effect Scotland would still need to convince EU member states who are wrestling with their own separatist movements to accept a unique Brexit solution for Scotland, or ultimately admit Scotland as a new member state if it votes for independence. In France, Corsican separatist Francois Alfonsi, president of a coalition of regional groups called the European Free Alliance (EFA), told a meeting on the sidelines of the conference that attitudes towards Scottish independence are shifting in Europe. "It is historic, this vote for Brexit, because it is creating conditions very new for the independence of Scotland," Alfonsi said. "EFA has to be unconditional supporters of the SNP, but there are other supporters now."

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has said it’s “highly likely” that Scotland will secede from the United Kingdom in the near future. She said preparations for a second independence referendum are already underway. Sturgeon told members of her pro-independence Scottish National Party on Sunday that: “I have never doubted that Scotland will one day become an independent country and I ... Read More »

US suspends deportations to Haiti in wake of Hurricane Matthew

The US has suspended deportations to Haiti after Hurricane Matthew. More than two million people in Haiti have been impacted by the worst disaster to hit the country since a 2010 earthquake. US Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson on Tuesday said deportations of Haitians illegally in the United States would be temporarily suspended due to the humanitarian crisis in the wake of Hurricane Matthew. The United States halted deportations of Haitians after the devastating 2010 earthquake. Nearly 500 people were killed when Hurricane Matthew whipped through the impoverished nation last week leaving a trail of devastation. Johnson said the United States would resume deportations in the future, but needed to "be sympathetic to the plight of the people of Haiti as a result" of the hurricane. Last month, the United States announced it would halt special provisions that prevented deportations of Haitians put in place after the earthquake. The policy shift came in response to a spike in Haitian immigrants crossing the Mexican border. Thousands of Haitians are in Mexican border towns trying to cross into the United States. The United Nations estimates that at least 1.4 million people need assistance and 2.1 million have been affected by the hurricane, the worst disaster to strike Haiti since the 2010 earthquake. In response, the United Nations launched a $120 million appeal for the next three months as people struggle to find food and clean water. The poorest country in the Americas was already dealing with a cholera outbreak, which has claimed 10,000 lives since 2010 after UN peacekeepers introduced the disease. Fearing the outbreak could widen, the World Health Organization pledged Tuesday to provide a million doses of cholera vaccines.

The US has suspended deportations to Haiti after Hurricane Matthew. More than two million people in Haiti have been impacted by the worst disaster to hit the country since a 2010 earthquake. US Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson on Tuesday said deportations of Haitians illegally in the United States would be temporarily suspended due to the humanitarian crisis in the ... Read More »

Ethiopia declares state of emergency over Oromia unrest

The Ethiopian government has declared a state of emergency across the country following days of deadly anti-government protests. Prime Minister Desalegn insists the move will not breach the basic rights of citizens. The state-owned Ethiopian Broadcasting Corporation said the government aimed to deal with "anti-peace elements" that are "jeopardizing the peace and security" of the country. "The Council of Ministers has declared a state of emergency that will be effective as of Sunday evening so as to deal with anti-peace elements that have allied with foreign forces and are jeopardizing the peace and security of the country," the broadcaster announced Sunday morning. The authorities also assessed the damage in anti-government protests to foreign-owned factories and flower farms in the capital Addis Ababa. "A state of emergency has been declared because the situation posed a threat against the people of the country," Prime Minister Hailemariam said in his TV message. "The emergency will not breach basic human rights enshrined under the Ethiopian constitution and won't also effect diplomatic rights listed under the Vienna Convention," the PM insisted. The state of emergency will be in place for six months, but could be shortened if the security situation improves, according to the local Fortune newspaper. The state broadcaster said the details would be announced soon. Resentment At least 52 people were crushed to death in a stampede last week after police volleyed tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse an anti-government protest. Witnesses in the town of Bishoftu said police in the Oromia region fired tear gas and warning shots to disperse anti-government protesters at a religious festival to celebrate the end of the rainy season, triggering a stampede that caused numerous deaths. The event quickly devolved into chaos, with protesters throwing stones and bottles facing off against riot police, setting off a mass panic. Ethiopia is facing its most severe anti-government protests in a decade. Trouble started in the central and western Oromia region in 2015. In recent months, it has spread to the northern Amhara region. The Oromo protests were initially aimed at the government's plan to extend the boundary of Addis Ababa amid concerns that the move would displace the farmers. Human Rights Watch said the security forces killed over 400 people since the start of demonstrations. The government had to reverse the boundary plan, but the Oromo community still feels excluded politically and economically.

The Ethiopian government has declared a state of emergency across the country following days of deadly anti-government protests. Prime Minister Desalegn insists the move will not breach the basic rights of citizens. The state-owned Ethiopian Broadcasting Corporation said the government aimed to deal with “anti-peace elements” that are “jeopardizing the peace and security” of the country. “The Council of Ministers ... Read More »

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