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Honey is a new approach to fighting antibiotic resistance: study

Medical professionals sometimes use honey successfully as a topical dressing but it could play a larger role in fighting infections, reported health news. The unique property of honey lies in its ability to fight infection on multiple levels making it more difficult for bacteria to develop resistance. That is it uses a combination of weapons including hydrogen peroxide, acidity, osmotic effect, high sugar concentration - all of which actively kill bacterial cells. The osmotic effect which is the result of the high sugar concentration in honey draws water from the bacterial cells dehydrating and killing them. In addition, several studies have shown that honey inhibits the formation of biofilms or communities of slimy disease causing bacteria. Honey may also disrupt quorum sensing which weakens bacterial virulence rendering the bacteria more susceptible to conventional antibiotics. Quorum sensing is the way bacteria communicate with one another and may be involved in the formation of biofilms. In certain bacteria this communication system also controls the release of toxins which affects the bacteria’s pathogenicity or their ability to cause disease. Team of researchers is also finding that honey has antioxidant properties and is an effective antibacterial.

Medical professionals sometimes use honey successfully as a topical dressing but it could play a larger role in fighting infections, reported health news. The unique property of honey lies in its ability to fight infection on multiple levels making it more difficult for bacteria to develop resistance. That is it uses a combination of weapons including hydrogen peroxide, acidity, osmotic ... Read More »

Exercise video games may add to kids activity

NEW YORK: Giving children active video games to play while they follow a weight management program boosts their moderate and vigorous activity levels, according to a new study. Kids who played the active video games also lost more weight than children who only followed the weight management program. Traditionally, studies have examined what harms may come from children spending long hours sitting and playing video games. "We thought - if you received active games - maybe we can turn this lemon into lemonade," Dr. Deneen Vojta told Reuters Health. She is the study's senior author from the UnitedHealth Center for Health Reform and Modernization at the UnitedHealth Group in Minnetonka, Minnesota. "Wouldn't it be great if instead of beating on kids about screen time we turned screen time into a positive?" she said. For the new study, the researchers built upon an existing weight loss program for children and their parents that had been found to work. They recruited 75 overweight and obese Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Texas children who were randomized to one of two groups for a 16-week study period. Both groups took part in the weight management program at local YMCAs and schools, but one group also received an Xbox game console and two active games. The Xbox Kinect device captures the child's body movements to operate the game. The games given to the kids in the active gaming group were Kinect Adventures! and Kinect Sports. (Children in the weight-loss program-only group received the same equipment and games at the end of the study). All the children's activity were recorded using an accelerometer, which measures movement, during the day. At the start of the study, the children were between the ages of 8 and 12 years old and weighed between 123 and 132 pounds (lbs). About 67 percent of the kids had a body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight relative to height, that put them in the overweight category for their age groups. The rest of the children were in the obese category. The researchers found that children in the group that received the active games added about seven minutes of moderate to vigorous activity and about three minutes of vigorous activity to their daily routines over the 16 weeks. Meanwhile children in the group that only took part in the weight loss program didn't experience a significant change in their activity levels or duration. Although the difference between groups appears to be small, the researchers write in JAMA Pediatrics, the added activity among the game-users group is equivalent to about 4 lbs of fat lost over a year. They also found a greater percentage of children in the active-gaming group were no longer in the overweight category by the end of the study. The percentage overweight had dropped a little over 9 percent in the active gaming group versus just under 4 percent in the comparison group. "Sure enough, the outcomes were very, very good," Vojta said. The authors note in the paper, however, that they cannot be sure the children sustained their weight loss and increased activity beyond the 16 weeks. The findings are in keeping with results from a 2012 study that found about one-quarter of 1,200 Canadian high school students played active games. That translated to about an hour of exercise two days a week. Still, other studies have suggested that active games don't help kids meet the daily recommended dose of physical activity. Vojta said they are currently working on incorporating the weight management program into a home-based program, for instance, one that would be administered through the game console. "In many ways, these home-based active gaming solutions solve two problems," she said. The games give children and adults the ability to build up a tolerance to exercise in their own homes, she said, and they give people who live in rough or high-crime areas an opportunity to exercise safely.REUTERS

NEW YORK: Giving children active video games to play while they follow a weight management program boosts their moderate and vigorous activity levels, according to a new study. Kids who played the active video games also lost more weight than children who only followed the weight management program. Traditionally, studies have examined what harms may come from children spending long ... Read More »

Antibiotics in early childhood increases risks of asthma: study

The information of a cohort of Finnish children born from 1996 to 2004 collected from the national registry was used in the study. Among the children, more than 16,000 diagnosed with cow's milk allergy and 20,000 with asthma by the end of 2005 were identified as cases. For each case, one gender, birth date and birth hospital district-matched child was selected. Information on antibiotic purchases and other related factors was obtained from some other relevant national authorities. After comparative analysis, the result showed that the children who used antibiotics had a higher risk of developing asthma or cow's milk allergy in early childhood than those who did not use antibiotics. According to the author of the thesis, the prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases in childhood has increased in many industrialized countries in the world since the second half of the twentieth century. To reduce the prevalence, identifying the factors that may influence the development of asthma and allergic diseases is therefore an important precondition.

The information of a cohort of Finnish children born from 1996 to 2004 collected from the national registry was used in the study. Among the children, more than 16,000 diagnosed with cow’s milk allergy and 20,000 with asthma by the end of 2005 were identified as cases. For each case, one gender, birth date and birth hospital district-matched child was ... Read More »

Slightly elevated blood pressure also tied to strokes

NEW YORK: People with blood pressure that is elevated but not enough to be considered "high" are still at an increased risk for strokes, according to a new analysis of past studies. Researchers found that having so-called prehypertension was linked to a 66 percent increased risk of stroke. "There has been disagreement in the community in general," Dr. Joshua Willey told Reuters Health. "Are these people at risk for stroke?" Willey, a neurologist at Columbia University in New York, was not involved with the new study. Blood pressure is measured using two numbers. The first, known as the systolic or top number, is a measure of the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats. The second, known as the diastolic or bottom number, is the pressure in the arteries between heartbeats. Normal blood pressure is a systolic reading of less than 120 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) and a diastolic reading of less than 80 mm Hg, according to the American Heart Association. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is defined as a reading of 140/90 mm Hg or above. Hypertension - along with high cholesterol, heart disease and diabetes - is a known risk factor for stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Blood pressure readings between the normal and high marks are considered prehypertension. Dr. Yuli Huang from Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China, and colleagues write in the journal Neurology that a previous analysis found an increased risk of stroke among people with blood pressure readings just below the cutoff for high blood pressure, but not among those whose blood pressure was only elevated a few points. Since then, however, more data have been published and the researchers wanted to take another look. They combined the results of 19 studies that included 762,393 participants from around the world. Compared to people who had normal blood pressure, those who had elevated - but not high - blood pressure were 66 percent more likely to have a stroke. The researchers write that about a fifth of the strokes reported in the studies were attributable to prehypertension. Huang and colleagues then compared people with low-range prehypertension, which they defined as a blood pressure reading between 120/80 mm Hg and 129/84 mm Hg, and high-range prehypertension, or a reading between 130/85 mm Hg and 139/89 mm Hg, to people with normal blood pressure. They found that having low-range prehypertension was tied to a 44 percent increased risk of stroke and having high-range prehypertension was tied to a 95 percent increased risk. According to the Cleveland Clinic, men around age 60, for example, have an average 10-year stroke probability of 11%. Increasing that by 44 percent would bring the risk to about 16%. About 800,000 Americans have strokes every year, according to the CDC. Dr. Robert Brown, a stroke specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, said the study is not definitive but stroke neurologists continue to be concerned about prehypertension. "In the world of stroke and cerebrovascular disease we continue to have the concern that even if your blood pressure is not 140/90 - if it is at a level that's somewhat close to that - you might be at a heightened risk for stroke," he said. Brown was not involved with the new study. "What we have not been able to define as of yet is whether treatment (with blood pressure medicine) of patients with prehypertension will reduce their risk of having stroke or other vascular events over time," he added. Instead, the study's authors write that doctors should recommend lifestyle changes to their patients with prehypertension. Willey said those lifestyle modifications include diet changes and increased exercise.REUTERS

NEW YORK: People with blood pressure that is elevated but not enough to be considered “high” are still at an increased risk for strokes, according to a new analysis of past studies. Researchers found that having so-called prehypertension was linked to a 66 percent increased risk of stroke. “There has been disagreement in the community in general,” Dr. Joshua Willey ... Read More »

Scientists find key ‘fat gene

PARIS: Geneticists said Wednesday they had pinpointed the most important obesity gene yet, throwing up a possible target for drugs to tackle a dangerous and growing epidemic. Mice bred to lack a gene dubbed IRX3 were almost a third lighter than rodents with the gene, they said. The equivalent gene exists in humans, and its functioning may explain why some people are more prone to obesity than others. "Our data strongly suggests that IRX3 controls body mass and regulates body composition," said Marcelo Nobrega of the University of Chicago, who headed the investigation published in the journal Nature. It likely does so by regulating metabolism. The discovery may help solve a riddle that has confounded researchers delving into the genetics of girth. Previous research had identified a gene called FTO as the main genetic culprit in obesity after observing an apparent link between variants within the gene and surplus body fat. But no-one has been able to show that these mutations actually change the functioning of the FTO gene in any way. "Now, we offer an explanation for that. They were looking at the wrong gene," Nobrega told AFP. Instead of affecting the FTO gene itself, the mutations triggered a reaction in a distant gene, IRX3, the new research said. This causes an over-production of IRX3 protein in the brain, possibly affecting the hypothalamus, where metabolism and appetite are regulated. "The mutations that are predisposing to obesity occur inside the FTO gene, hence the wide belief that they were connected to the function of FTO," Nobrega said. "Even though the mutations are inside FTO, they are actually impacting the function of the IRX3 gene, not FTO." The scientists used mouse and zebrafish embryos, adult mouse brains and human cells, including brain cells, to show the interaction between IRX3 and FTO in the lab. - More energy burnt - They then engineered mice without the IRX3 gene, resulting in animals "that are thin, resistant to obesity and diabetes, and that burn energy more efficiently," said Nobrega. They weighed about 30 percent less despite eating and exercising the same amount as mice with the gene. Nobrega said the ultimate goal was to identify which cell functions were being altered by IRX3, and how, so that drugs can be developed to block the obesity-causing effects. The study "clearly demonstrates a previously unappreciated role for IRX3 in controlling body weight," David Gorkin and Bing Ren of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in California wrote in a comment also carried by Nature. Obesity and related diseases like diabetes have gained epidemic proportions in many developed countries. The causes are complex: a lack of exercise, high-fat and high-sugar diets, and genetic heritance are all believed to contribute. Numerous other genes have been fingered in obesity before, and experts have cautioned against placing too much hope on a swift and simple pharmaceutical solution. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), obesity nearly doubled worldwide from 1980 to 2008. More than a third of adults, some 1.4 billion, were overweight in 2008, and more than one in ten, about half-a-billion people, were obese. At least 2.8 million adults die each year as a result of being overweight or obese, says the UN's health organ. (AFP)

PARIS: Geneticists said Wednesday they had pinpointed the most important obesity gene yet, throwing up a possible target for drugs to tackle a dangerous and growing epidemic. Mice bred to lack a gene dubbed IRX3 were almost a third lighter than rodents with the gene, they said. The equivalent gene exists in humans, and its functioning may explain why some ... Read More »

Another Cambodian boy dies of bird flu: hospital

PHNOM PENH: An 11-year-old Cambodian boy has died of bird flu, a hospital official said Monday, the impoverished kingdom´s third confirmed fatality -- all children -- from the illness this year. The boy, who was from northern Kampong Chhnang province, died on Friday morning six hours after he was admitted to hospital, according to Denis Laurent, deputy director of Kantha Bopha Hospital in the capital. "We tried to do our best... but it was too late and we could not do anything to save him," he told AFP. Another doctor said the boy had eaten infected poultry. In an unrelated case, a second boy -- aged eight-years-old -- is in a stable condition in hospital in Phnom Penh after testing positive for the H5N1 deadly flu. The disease typically spreads from birds to humans through direct contact. But experts fear it could mutate into a form easily transmissible between humans, with the potential to trigger a pandemic. Authorities have struggled to control bird flu outbreaks in Cambodia, which recorded 14 deaths from the illness last year, the deadliest outbreak of the virus in the country since 2003.Cambodian children are at particular risk as they often live in close proximity to poultry. At the start of the month, a three-year-old boy from the outskirts of Phnom Penh died of H5N1.His death came weeks after that of another eight-year-old boy, from eastern Kratie province. His two-year-old sister died the same day but authorities said tests could not be carried out to confirm she had the virus. H5N1 has killed hundreds of people worldwide since a major outbreak in 2003, according to the WHO. Vietnam has also recorded two deaths in 2014. (AFP)

PHNOM PENH: An 11-year-old Cambodian boy has died of bird flu, a hospital official said Monday, the impoverished kingdom´s third confirmed fatality — all children — from the illness this year. The boy, who was from northern Kampong Chhnang province, died on Friday morning six hours after he was admitted to hospital, according to Denis Laurent, deputy director of Kantha ... Read More »

Potent new painkiller stokes alarm in US

Zohydro ER can contain 10 times the amount of hydrocodone as the most popular prescription painkiller, Vicodin, and is easily crushable so it could be snorted, bearing none of the recent safeguards added to pills like OxyContin (oxycodone). In a nation where some 15,000 people die annually from prescription painkiller use, the drug's approval has raised alarm among doctors, lawmakers and relatives of those lost to overdose. Two senators have launched an investigation into practices by the US Food and Drug Administration, amid allegations that pharmaceutical companies eager for a chunk of the $9 billion painkiller market may have paid to influence regulators' decisions. "It's almost unheard of," said Andrew Kolodny, president of the group Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing. "For FDA to approve a drug that is going to make a serious problem worse, it is pretty shocking." Zohydro was approved in October 2013, even though a panel of FDA-convened experts voted against 11-2. The FDA is not obligated to follow the advice of its advisory committees, but it typically does. An FDA spokesman told AFP the decision was made "after careful consideration," and "the product's benefits outweigh its risks when used as intended." Zohydro contains pure hydrocodone in a range of doses, including time-release options that are much stronger than competitor products. It does not contain acetaminophen, which can cause liver damage and death in high doses and is included in most other prescription opioids. The drugmaker, California-based Zogenix, said in a statement that the "acetaminophen-free formulation of extended release hydrocodone is an important therapeutic option for certain chronic pain patients."

Zohydro ER can contain 10 times the amount of hydrocodone as the most popular prescription painkiller, Vicodin, and is easily crushable so it could be snorted, bearing none of the recent safeguards added to pills like OxyContin (oxycodone). In a nation where some 15,000 people die annually from prescription painkiller use, the drug’s approval has raised alarm among doctors, lawmakers ... Read More »

Anger outbursts linked to swift heart attacks

PARIS: People who have outbursts of anger are at greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the two hours immediately after the episode, European researchers said Tuesday. The study -- a big review of published papers -- is the first to give powerful statistical backing to suspicions that strong emotions can drive cardiac risk, although the underlying biological causes remain unclear. In the two hours immediately after an angry outburst, an individual’s risk of myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome rose nearly five-fold, to 4.7 percent, compared to times when the person was calm, the study found. The risk of stroke tripled, to 3.6 percent, it also found. There were also higher risks for arrythmia, or an erratic beating of the heart. The risks rose proportionately if the person had a history of cardiovascular problems or was frequently angry. "Although the risk of experiencing an acute cardiovascular event with any single outburst of anger is relatively low, the risk can accumulate for people with frequent episodes of anger," said Elizabeth Mostofsky at the Harvard School of Public Health in Massachusetts. "This is particularly important for people who have higher risk due to other underlying risk factors or those who have already had a heart attack, stroke or diabetes. "For example, a person without many risk factors for cardiovascular disease, who has only one episode of anger per month, has a very small additional risk, but a person with multiple risk factors or a history of heart attack or stroke, and who is frequently angry, has a much higher absolute excess risk accumulated over time." - Risk rises with anger episodes - The researchers calculated that one extra heart attack per 10,000 people per year can be expected among people with low cardiovascular risk who are angry only once a month. This rises to an extra four per 10,000 people with a high cardiovascular risk. Among people who were frequently angry, five episodes of anger a day would result in some 158 extra heart attacks per 10,000 people with a low cardiovascular risk per year. The tally would increase to around 657 extra heart attacks per 10,000 among those with a high cardiovascular risk. The paper, published in the European Heart Journal, looked at nine previously published studies covering wide groups of people whose anger profile was known. The data trawl found more than 5,000 cases of heart attack and at least 800 of stroke. The methodology used in these published papers varied, but an unmistakeable association emerged from all of them, the authors said. Previous attempts to clarify the question were based on small sample sizes where few patients reported having outbursts of anger, they said. As a result, the picture was fuzzy or lacked credibility. The paper was not designed to explore why anger is so clearly linked to heart attack. The authors point to previous research which found that psychological stress increases heart rate and blood pressure. Changes in blood flow can cause blood clots and may stimulate an inflammatory response from the immune system. Further research is needed to pinpoint this mechanism and to finetune options for doctors mulling whether the best treatment should be drugs to lower cholesterol or blood pressure or psychological help or physical exercise to curb dangerous anger episodes -- or perhaps a combination. In an independent commentary, US specialists Suzanne Arnold and John Spertus from the University of Missouri and Brahmajee Nallamothu of the University of Michigan said the findings called for an all-round approach. "Treating anger in isolation is unlikely to be impactful," they wrote in the journal. "Instead, a broader and more comprehensive approach to treating acute and chronic mental stress, and its associated psychological stressors, is likely to be needed to heal a hostile heart." (AFP)

PARIS: People who have outbursts of anger are at greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the two hours immediately after the episode, European researchers said Tuesday. The study — a big review of published papers — is the first to give powerful statistical backing to suspicions that strong emotions can drive cardiac risk, although the underlying ... Read More »

Polio-like illness seen in up to 25 California children

SAN FRANCISCO: A rare and mysterious polio-like illness may have afflicted up to 25 children in California, several of whom have suffered limb paralysis, and health experts were struggling to identify the cause of the ailment, said medical researchers. Since 2012, between 20 and 25 previously healthy children from across California have shown signs of the illness, possibly caused by an infectious virus, the American Academy of Neurology said in a statement detailing the research of two California neurologists. One of the children remains in serious condition but none have died from the syndrome, researchers said. Stanford University pediatric neurologist Keith Van Haren said in a statement that the cases could indicate the possibility of an "emerging infectious polio-like syndrome in California," although federal health officials said there were too few cases to consider the spread of the ailment as an imminent threat. Polio, eradicated in the United States over three decades ago, is an infectious virus that can permanently paralyze or kill victims within hours of infection. A vaccine, developed in the 1950s nearly wiped out the disease worldwide, although it remains endemic in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. A study of five California children affected by the mystery ailment found they experienced the sudden paralysis of one or more limbs, with the symptoms reaching the height of severity within two days, according to findings of research by Van Haren and University of San Francisco neurologist Emmanuelle Waubant. "Although poliovirus has been eradicated from most of the globe, other viruses can also injure the spine, leading to a polio-like syndrome," Van Haren said in a statement. CHILDREN VACCINATED AGAINST POLIO Scans of the bodies of the five children included in the study also showed white spots on their spinal chords, indicating undefined damage, according to the research that is set to be released at an American Academy of Neurology meeting in Philadelphia in April. Despite the illness being similar to polio, all five of the children had been vaccinated against poliovirus before their symptoms began, the research showed. The additional 15 to 20 children showing signs of the syndrome were not closely analyzed in the study, but initial blood tests and other information collected showed they had suffered from sudden paralysis or extreme limb weakness and possible spinal chord damage, Waubant told Reuters. All the children were between the ages of 2 and 16. Two of the five children in the study tested positive for a strain of enterovirus, which has been linked to polio-like outbreaks in children in Asia and Australia over the past decade, while three tested negative, Waubant said. She said the children who were negative could have had the virus but were not tested in time for it to show up in their blood. The test results of the broader group of children with polio-like symptoms were pending, Waubant said. She said it was too soon to determine whether that particular virus had affected the bulk of the children. United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researcher Dr. Jane Seward said the center was aware of the study but said there were too few cases of the illness to suggest there was an imminent threat of the illness spreading across the state or the U.S. The California Department of Public Heath said it would release a statement about the study and its investigation into the reported illnesses later on Monday, and declined comment ahead of the planned statement..--REUTERS

SAN FRANCISCO: A rare and mysterious polio-like illness may have afflicted up to 25 children in California, several of whom have suffered limb paralysis, and health experts were struggling to identify the cause of the ailment, said medical researchers. Since 2012, between 20 and 25 previously healthy children from across California have shown signs of the illness, possibly caused by ... Read More »

Hookah is not harmless, experts say

NEW YORK: Smoking hookah can be addictive and harmful, though many dabblers may not realize the dangers, according to a new review. "The cooled and sweetened flavor of hookah tobacco makes it more enticing to kids and they falsely believe it's less harmful," Tracey E. Barnett from the University of Florida in Gainesville told Reuters Health. Barnett has studied the recent rise in teen hookah smoking. She was not involved in the new review, published in Respiratory Medicine. "One-time use can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning or other diseases, including but not limited to tuberculosis, herpes, respiratory illnesses including the flu, and long-term use can lead to heart disease and many cancers," Barnett said. Smoking with a hookah, or "shisha," device has become increasingly common in Europe and the Western Hemisphere in recent years. The practice rose to prominence on the Indian subcontinent among Hindus in the 15th Century and subsequently spread through the Ottoman Empire. According to one estimate, about 100 million people worldwide smoke hookah each day. Though the water-pipe device with its series of tubes and mouthpieces looks nothing like a cigarette, it is almost always used to smoke tobacco, and as such carries many of the dangers inherent in cigarette smoking. "While water is a filter, it does not filter out any of the toxins," Barnett said. The new review brings together the results of several studies on addiction, lung damage and health dangers associated with hookah smoking. According to the World Health Organization, one hookah session typically lasts 20 to 80 minutes and a hookah user may inhale as much smoke during one session as a cigarette smoker would from smoking 100 or more cigarettes. The review authors, led by Dr. Ruben Blachman-Braun of Universidad Anahuac in Huixquilucan, Mexico, cite another study which found nicotine levels in the urine of daily hookah smokers were equivalent to levels in people smoking 10 cigarettes per day, more than enough to spark addiction. In the existing scientific literature, hookah has been linked with health problems including chronic bronchitis, lung cancer, oral cancer, prostate cancer, heart disease and pregnancy complications similar to those seen with cigarette smoking. It has also been tied to the hepatitis C virus and herpes from sharing mouthpieces. In one 2013 study in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, researchers treated cells from the lining of human lungs with tobacco and non-tobacco smoke from a water pipe smoking machine. They found that smoke from a hookah pipe slows down and stunts lung production regardless of whether the smoke came from a tobacco or tobacco-free product. People don't generally seem to understand just how dangerous hookah smoking can be, said Adrienne J. Heinz. She studies alcohol and drug use patterns at the Stanford University School of Medicine in California and was not involved in the new review. "In casual conversations with friends and patients - folks often appreciate that smoking anything comes with risks," Heinz said. "However, hookah is certainly viewed as more benign, and when you share general facts about toxin exposure in one hookah session, it often shocks and surprises them." Results of an online survey of more than 5,000 college students, also published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research in 2013, indicated that more than 10 percent of college students had recently smoked hookah, which was the most widely used of non-cigarette tobacco products. A similar study using online questionnaires of college students found 13 percent of them tried hookah for the first time in one seven-month period, and those who had less apprehension about the dangers were more likely to try it. It's easy to see why people might be surprised at the dangers of hookah, since there haven't been public health campaigns to raise awareness of hookah risks the way there have been campaigns about cigarette smoking, Heinz said. "There is also the misconception that because hookah sessions tend to be less frequent than smoking a cigarette, and because hookah is smoked through a water chamber, that the practice is safer," she said. Hookah is deemed more socially acceptable than other forms of smoking, Barnett said. But people should not think of hookah as a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes, she said. REUTERS

NEW YORK: Smoking hookah can be addictive and harmful, though many dabblers may not realize the dangers, according to a new review. “The cooled and sweetened flavor of hookah tobacco makes it more enticing to kids and they falsely believe it’s less harmful,” Tracey E. Barnett from the University of Florida in Gainesville told Reuters Health. Barnett has studied the ... Read More »

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