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Two Losers

Amer Ishaq Soharwardi It was evident but no one believes that it could come so quickly. Ever hated word war was crafted in such a way that it potentially becomes cancer. With human race entering into news phases all the advancements and inventions now seems to help one word “War”. Historic human bargains either in the form of individual efforts or collective deals were never intended to reach to conclusive peace. A peace which can grow and incorporate more peace, which can extend without the help of any thought, any motive or any venture. A peace that can really last independently but can human race do that? Do they have the ability? Do power-hungry despots, monarch and democratic dictators really allow the human race to do that? Centuries seems very grand but in contrast to human existence in this planet looks tiny. The only two types of human race has the same relationship existing from millenniums, the powerful and the powerless there is no third category which ever existed in human race there is not a single war between these two classes of human race, but the wars are fought between the power-hungry all-powerful elite and the poor and less fortunate were used as fuels. The biggest killer of humankind is the European colonization of Americas as a result of this the estimated death toll is 100 million humans, world war two killed 72 million humans while world war one killed 65 million people. Across Europe between crusades and holocaust several hundred humans were killed and do you know how many people were tried in courts for killing innocent people historically second to none. The warfare since First World War has turned in to industry and that war industry will be the one great fact which will destroy the human race. Imperialists lead to colonialism and although historically it has ended we all know that it has never ended it has converted. The industrial revolution supports humankind as so many inventions and so many products were human-friendly. The rapid expansion of medicine industry also helped humans to fight against many deadly diseases. Lust of power led to world war one and two and the cold war and the war on terror and the war to be fought in future of human race if there is. Let us examine one more aspect of how commercialism breeds wars, guns were made for security purpose, then they were used in hunting and when the cost of production comes down there was a mass production drive and from there starts the present dark age of humankind, most wars are fought either to sell more weapons or to see the utilization and ambit of destruction of weapons. The gains were seen as for few governments but history now reveals that the gains were too few companies and for few individuals. The second historical fact comes from the pharmaceutical industry. Medicines are made to cure and it was like that till the pioneer humanity symbol was converted into an industry, it was widely believed till it was revealed to humankind that most pharma companies are investing more on germ production and less on medicines research. So now every day we see new advanced forms of the disease. From malaria till dengue the story is never-ending. From Fog to Smog the story is ever developing. Let us think for a second is it really the fate of the world or is it the power hunger of few which is causing all this, now we have more weapons guns and bullets then we have humans. The nuclear arsenal can destroy this world for several hundred times. The emergence of various terror groups who were functional in few states is now converted into homegrown terror. The UNleashed monster is now striking everywhere and no concrete methodology is developed by anyone (from the US to UN) to fight to win this war. No alternate methodology is developed to fight this war. The world has failed in solving global issues militarily now this is the time to sit together seriously otherwise the group of few will emerge once again and a few years from now we will be asking the same question, are we winning this war and they will reply,, we need more fuel and human race will be used again as fuel. What is this human race will ask and the answer would be Clash of civilization. If this does not satisfy the race then there can be other answers like new war on terror, new crusade, and new extremism and they go on with new definitions of war. As humans, we need to understand that this earth is our first and last home and if we go on with the tendency of encouraging war in different types the last homeland will vanish. Leaving behind only two losers the powerless and the powerful.

Amer Ishaq Soharwardi It was evident but no one believes that it could come so quickly. Ever hated word war was crafted in such a way that it potentially becomes cancer. With human race entering into news phases all the advancements and inventions now seems to help one word “War”. Historic human bargains either in the form of individual efforts ... Read More »

The Rape Capital and the Monster Strikes back

In any civilized society rape is one of the most heinous crimes against humanity, but in India rape is becoming a tool. A tool through which women in the cities are terrorized and in small town and villages are controlled. But what happened today shows the indecency of the whole society. A woman was allegedly raped by a drunken man in broad daylight on a footpath along a busy road in Visakhapatnam city of India’s Andhra Pradesh state. The horrific crime was captured on camera, as onlookers decided to take a video of the incident, instead of helping the victim. According to reports, the accused, identified as 23-year-old G Shiva, a truck driver, has been arrested. The incident is said to have occurred on Sunday at 2 pm near a railway station in Vizag, where the woman was sitting behind a tree on the footpath. The accused, apparently heavily drunk at the time, approached her and allegedly forced himself upon her. The entire incident was recorded by a driver present at the spot. However, even as several people walked past the road, not a single person made an attempt to stop the man from committing the crime of raping the hapless woman. So we all must understand now what an extremist leader can do to a nation. It is really unbelievable but violence against women in BJP India under Nirandr Modi is alarming. Just in last four years there is an alarming rise in crime against women and rape has became the most effective tool of harassing women in India. If we calculate the rise in rap cases it’s about 34% in last four years. If we see the international statistics we may see India doing better but actually it’s not. In Europe and America and so many other countries if a women is raped 4o times by a gang it not one case its 40 cases while in India if a women is raped 100 time by a men in a span of any given time it is just one rape. The monster unleashed by Indian Army against minorities and specially against Kashmiri women is now coming to home and India as a state and its capital as a capital are rape capitals of the world. Without getting in to statistics let us understand this point that why all this is happening in a country which claims to be the champion of human right and democracy. Rape is used as a tool to pressurize minorities in India. Not just in Kashmir but in Assam, Tripura Bengal everywhere rape is a tool of getting dominance. According to Asia Watch report rape by Indian police is common throughout India; the victims are generally poor women and those from vulnerable low-caste and tribal minority groups. In some cases, women are taken into custody as suspects in petty crime or on more serious charges; in others, women are detained as hostages for relatives wanted in criminal or political cases; in still others, women are detained simply so that the police can extort a bribe to secure their release. In all of these cases, women in the custody of security forces are at risk of rape. Rape has also been widely reported during counter-insurgency operations elsewhere in India, particularly in Assam and other areas of conflict in northeastern India. In conflict and non-conflict situations, the central element of rape by the security forces is power. Soldiers and police use rape as a weapon to punish, intimidate, coerce, humiliate and degrade. A tool which is used mainly by Indian Army and police. Just in Kashmir there are thousands of women who get raped by Indian forces. There are no reliable statistics on the number of rapes committed by security forces in Kashmir. Human rights groups have documented many cases since 1990,. There can be no doubt that the use of rape is common and routinely goes unpunished. Indian government authorities have rarely investigated charges of rape by security forces in Kashmir. According to a Human Rights Watch (HRW) report, the security forces use rape as a method of retaliation against Kashmiri civilians during reprisal attacks after militant ambushes. Most rape cases, according to the same report, have occurred during cordon-and-search operations. Security personnel in Kashmir have used "rape as a counterinsurgency tactic Scholar Inger Skhjelsbaek states that the pattern of rape in Kashmir is that soldiers enter the homes of civilians, kill or evict the men and then rape the women present. Scholar Shubh Mathur calls rape an essential element of the Indian military strategy in Kashmir. Rape in Kashmir is a cultural weapon of war and the rape of Kashmiri women by Indian security forces, in the context of a predominantly Hindu state repressing a Muslim minority population, functions as a tool of subordinating Kashmiri men and the Kashmiri community at large. She also states that rape is used to demoralize the Kashmiri resistance and that there have been documented cases of soldiers confessing that they were ordered to rape women. Professor William Baker stated at the 52nd United Nations Commission on Human Rights that rape in Kashmir was not the result of a few undisciplined soldiers but an active strategy of the security forces to humiliate and intimidate the Kashmiri population. He cited as evidence his interviews with several rape victims who were raped by soldiers in front of their families, including husbands and children An Amnesty International report in 1992 stated that rape in Kashmir was a systematic attempt to humiliate the local population during counter-insurgency operations. Dr Maiti, a professor of political science at Burdwan University, has denounced the use of rape as an instrument of Indian oppression against the Kashmiri population, where the majority of victims are civilians. But unfortunately all this is still predominantly the tool used by Indian forces. The situation is still worst with more than 700,000 Indian troops continuing the same strategy with even further zeal under Modi Administration. According to Aljazeera News At least 34,651 cases of rape were reported across India last year, statistics released by the country's National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) have revealed. Victims knew their alleged rapists in 33,098 of the 34,651 reported rape cases, or 95.5 percent, according to the figures, which also showed a slight decrease compared with the 36,735 rape cases reported in 2014. The Indian capitol city Delhi is also the rape capital of India Delhi recorded the highest number of rape cases in the country in 2013 at 1,636, more than double the number in 2012 (706). This was followed by 391 cases in Mumbai, 192 cases in Jaipur and 171 cases in Pune in 2013. Ninety-two women were raped on an average every day in India and the national capital with 1,636 cases recorded the highest number of such crimes among all cities last year. According to figures released by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB), the total number of rape cases reported in India has gone up to 33,707 in 2013 from 24,923 in 2012. In 15,556 cases, the rape victims were aged between 18 and 30 years in 2013. Friedrich Nietzsche, has written in Beyond Good and Evil, Aphorism that .He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you. The tool used by Indian army is now striking back monster is coming home. The only way to fight with this situation is to start a policy to appease minorities and especially to the areas where Indian Army, police and other law enforcement agencies are carrying out operation. If immediate attention is not given by Modi government than it will be too late.

Amer Ishaq Soharwardi In any civilized society rape is one of the most heinous crimes against humanity, but in India rape is becoming a tool. A tool through which women in the cities are terrorized and in small town and villages are controlled. But what happened today shows the indecency of the whole society. A woman was allegedly raped by ... Read More »

Can Bayer Leverkusen progress after exodus of key players?

First Omer Toprak left Leverkusen, then Hakan Calhanoglu, now Chicharito. With other key men likely to follow them out, is there any hope that a club that's become a fixture in the top four can stop the rot next term? “It was not a difficult decision." Those were the words of Javier Hernandez (aka Chicharito) as he pulled on a West Ham shirt for the first time after completing his move back to England on Monday. He seemed to be referring mainly to the decision to join the London club rather than the one to leave the Werkself, but the sentiment seems applicable to both cases. The Mexican striker endured a difficult end to an otherwise prolific Bundesliga career, as the service dried up in a team desperately struggling to keep their heads above water. Leverkusen suffered through a desperate second half of the season, winning just four league games after the winter break until a cathartic 6-2 defeat of Hertha Berlin on the last day of the season, after safety was assured, gave them a measure of relief. That win also meant they finished 12th, a position that flattered a side that looked woeful under Roger Schmidt and even worse during the short-lived reign of Tayfun Korkut. It was all a far cry from Chicharito's debut campaign for the club, when he scored 17 times in 28 appearances and was the league's Player of the Month three times, as Leverkusen picked up the 'best of the rest' trophy behind Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund – about the best the other Bundesliga clubs can hope for these days. Where will the goals come from? But thoughts of challenging for even that dubious crown seem fanciful at this point. Chicharito may well have wanted out whatever happened but the departures of Calhanoglu, who provided a goal or assist every 110 minutes last term in an interrupted Bundesliga campaign, and Toprak – a defender good enough to step up a level to BVB - must have made him question the club's ambition. Of course, there's still plenty of time in the transfer window (though Leverkusen's first German Cup game is in a little over a fortnight) but Sven Bender and Dominik Kohr don't feel like upgrades. Bender may offer some defensive stability, which would be further enhanced if Jonathan Tah can regain fitness, but it's going forward that Leverkusen look set to struggle. No-one but Hernandez even reached double figures for goals in all competitions last term and removing Calhangolu from the equation as well means only Kevin Volland (9) and Joel Pohjanpalo (6) scored more than 4. It's no wonder new coach Heiko Herrlich, the club's eighth boss in nine years, has been preaching the virtues of teamwork over individuals. Teamwork the key for new boss "Hakan of course has huge quality, as do Kevin [Kampl, who has also asked to leave] and Chicharito," he told the Bundesliga website before the Chicharito deal went through. "But ultimately it’s important that the players that you have available identify 100 per cent with the club. Things will soon be clear - then we'll see more. "I think a club like Bayer Leverkusen will never find themselves depending on just one player. Chicharito has given great performances in his two years here, but so have many others. You can only achieve success as a team." Perhaps Herrlich will forge the collective identity that the side lacked last year, but even the hardest working sides need matchwinners. Leverkusen have become a fixture at the top end in recent years, never failing to finish outside the top 5 in the seven years before last. But with the emergence of Leipzig and Hoffenheim and even Hertha Berlin and Cologne starting to make small but significant strides, it's becoming more and more difficult to see a way back to the Champions League for a club who famously reached the final in 2002. Perhaps that's not the expectation anymore and perhaps they can hang on to a small but talented crop of youngsters – Tah, Julian Brandt and Kai Havertz chief among them – and make progress that way. But, as Dortmund found out last term, losing three key players in one stroke is a difficult trick to pull.

First Omer Toprak left Leverkusen, then Hakan Calhanoglu, now Chicharito. With other key men likely to follow them out, is there any hope that a club that’s become a fixture in the top four can stop the rot next term? “It was not a difficult decision.” Those were the words of Javier Hernandez (aka Chicharito) as he pulled on a ... Read More »

Security expert Bruns: ‘There should be a European naval aid unit’

Europe is divided over the refugee crisis and there is no unified approach in response, says Sebastian Bruns. According to the security expert, a joint naval aid unit could provide an opportunity. Deutsche Welle: Looking at the map, there's Libya as a failed state on the one side and Italy overburdened with refugees on the other. Can you describe the risks that are created in this part of the Mediterranean Sea? Sebastian Bruns: The area between Libya and Italy is one of the narrowest parts of the Mediterranean. It is the main route for illegal migration where smugglers and trafficking networks operate, and desperate people from Africa and Asia cross over. When the Balkan route was closed, migrants started looking for alternative routes, which they found here. The EU-run naval mission Sophia is also active in this part of the Mediterranean, increasing chances of rescue and survival. Read: EU countries decline to help Italy with Mediterranean refugee crisis Why is the area so difficult to control? One of the main issues is the sheer size: The area that "Sophia" patrols is about as big as Germany. There are between six to eight vessels operating as part of the mission in addition to private rescue organizations. But this is not enough. You can only cover an area of this size by providing more aerial coverage than currently is available. You need additional aircraft in order to coordinate this. This is a difficult endeavor. And at the end of the day, you also need the political commitment to a permanent presence. But Europe is divided over the refugee crisis. There is no integrated European Coast Guard; various coast guards and the marine units are all still national entities. Frontex does finally have a maritime mandate, but the problem is the second-rate treatment that the EU border protection agency receives from EU-member states, as it does not have its own large vessels or planes. Italy has announced to block the extension of Sophia, calling into question the mission itself. What has to happen next? The root causes of migration have to be addressed on the ground; there is no way around it. All the efforts produced by the marine units, private NGOs or Frontex are merely fighting the symptoms. Libya needs proper structures that prevent smuggling networks from operating. And further south, the root causes of migration also have to be addressed. That's a task for an entire generation to deal with. But Europe only wants to deploy limited resources. On the one hand, there is a willingness to implement a 'Marshall plan' for Africa, which I am skeptical about. On the other hand, European forces are also needed elsewhere. There are many other hotspots, not only because Russia is acting in increasingly belligerent ways since 2014.There is Syria, the eastern Mediterranean, the north Atlantic, the Baltic Sea, and Antarctica. I think Italy's attempt to block Sophia is partly an act of despair. What ideas are there for alternative measures that could increase maritime security? First of all, there is the European Union Border Assistance Mission (EUBAM) in Libya which has been training the Libyan Coast Guard since 2016. This involves apprenticeship training for maritime sailors. However, equipment, ships and training are also needed, and it remains extremely difficult to create a national coast guard in Libya because of the situation with the warlords, which creates different, opposing forces that mistrust and fight each other. And it is not enough to create a functional coast guard; you also need port police, prosecutors, courts, everything that makes up "good governance." This is a monumental task as well. Secondly, there should be a European naval aid unit for this part of the Mediterranean. I proposed this idea in an article once. What I mean by that is that countries have to stop sending ships and destroyers individually and join together their efforts instead. All EU-countries should participate with coast guard ships, water police, and smaller units - the kind of units that don't necessarily need to be equipped to hunt submarines in the Atlantic. It would take some of the burden off of European naval forces. Private rescue missions could also be involved in this naval unit, which would help advance the integration of civilian, military and police forces. There are many proposals concerning Libya and this part of the Mediterranean, but they need to be tied together. Such a naval aid unit could possibly be a step forward. Read: 'Defend Europe' Identitarians charter a ship to return migrants to Africa You are proposing a unified naval aid unit. How can it be put into practice? I suggest we finally follow up on the idea of a European coast guard. We need an integrated structure where police, military and civilian helpers can collaborate and coordinate. We also need the political backing for this. For the EU, this would provide a chance for further integration. But this also requires a certain level of honesty when addressing the tasks and purposes of this unit. We can no longer dodge the question of how we want to proceed in this area of maritime security. But such a European coast guard is definitely a first step to take. Dr. Sebastian Bruns is head of the Center for Maritime Strategy and Security at the Institute for Security Policy at the University Kiel.

Europe is divided over the refugee crisis and there is no unified approach in response, says Sebastian Bruns. According to the security expert, a joint naval aid unit could provide an opportunity. Deutsche Welle: Looking at the map, there’s Libya as a failed state on the one side and Italy overburdened with refugees on the other. Can you describe the ... Read More »

British people ‘will not want to carry on as before’

The latest attack in London comes only days ahead of one of Britain's most crucial general elections in decades. DW asked political scientist Anthony Glees what bearing it might have. DW: Major political parties have, at least temporarily, suspended the election campaign. Is it possible to assess the political consequences of the attack's coming so shortly before the parliamentary elections? Anthony Glees: I think it is possible to asses the consequences. For one thing we've got a Labour Party led by somebody who believes that you can talk to terrorists and bring them to the conference table. The Islamists are clearly not people who want to talk to anybody at a conference table. They want to explode the conference table. We've also got a Conservative prime minister who, when she was in the Home Office, abolished one of the few measures that could have protected people in Britain from this kind of terrorism: namely, control orders. I think it's inevitable that, in the next few days of the election campaign, people will look to the security record of Jeremy Corbyn, who's also said he's opposed to a shoot-to-kill policy. I don't think you'd find anyone in London this morning that was not grateful that police shot these people to kill them within eight minutes of being called out. Jeremy Corbyn has also made a big deal out of his relationship with the IRA and with other groups, like Fatah and Hamas, that many people consider to be terrorists However, there will also be questions about Theresa May's judgment because her past has also been, by no means, uncheckered. As home secretary, May was responsible for budget cuts to the police. On the other hand, citizens often trust the Conservatives more than the left. What will sway them more come election day? It's a very good question because the positions have actually been outlined. And, in the aftermath of the Manchester bombing almost a fortnight ago, people did know very clearly what the two sides of the arguments were. Jeremy Corbyn, who looking at the issue globally, said that what's significant is that Britain should not intervene in foreign wars - that we should talk peace to the world rather than intervening, and that there is a kind of link, an unspecified link, between Islamist terrorism and the sort of foreign policy that Britain has had in the past. Then, there's Theresa May, who's been saying we need more of the same but nothing too dramatic. These are arguments that we've already been thinking about against the background of the terrorist attack in Manchester, and what's happened is that Jeremy Corbyn has been doing well. Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party are increasing their popular support. Theresa May is losing popular support. My feeling is that, at the end of the day on Thursday, it will rebound in favor of Theresa May, and that is because - even if she has made mistakes and even if the Conservatives have made mistakes - the ideology of the Conservative Party on security has been clear and strong and firm, whereas the ideology of Labour under Corbyn has been decidedly pacifist and weak. I don't think that will play well on Thursday, when people are actually at the ballot box. After every attack, we see police being deployed and foreign leaders expressing their solidarity. However, nothing seems to be changing. Are politicians powerless on this issue? I don't think they're powerless. I think there are things that they can do that they've been reluctant to do, but Theresa May just a few minutes ago (on Sunday morning) spoke about the need to tighten up substantially things like powers of arrest, the powers of detention and the powers of exclusion from the United Kingdom. The doubling of the number of people in MI5, Britain's security service, is also very important. They tell us that there are 23,000 people in the United Kingdom who want to do us harm. We can't fight these people - let alone defeat them - with the same number of people in our security service as we had when we were talking about hundreds, or a few thousand. We still have no information about the organizers of the attack, but there is an assumption that we are dealing with terrorism by Islamists. The UK seems to be targeted relatively often. Is there a specific reason for this? I think the reason is that we have been weakened as a country by a number of things: by successive elections, the Scottish referendum, the general election, the Brexit referendum and now this general election. We're a very divided, very uncertain country, and we look vulnerable. Islamists are like the big beasts in the jungle: They go for those they perceive as being weak, and that is the position that Britain is in right now. Without doubt, the Brexit issue has weakened Britain because nobody knows what Brexit means or how it will play out. Nobody knows - not even those who supported it have come up with any clear idea. There are historical reasons, as well, such as the invasion of Iraq - not that that was an attack on Islamism, of course: It was an attack on Saddam Hussein and his purported weapons of mass destruction. So far, people in Britain have shown restraint in their response. Are you seeing any risk of that changing in the future? I think the British people will demand the gloves come off now. I think there will be more control orders, there'll be more exclusion, there'll be more MI5 officers, there may be other measures, as well. I think the British people will not want to carry on as before.

The latest attack in London comes only days ahead of one of Britain’s most crucial general elections in decades. DW asked political scientist Anthony Glees what bearing it might have. DW: Major political parties have, at least temporarily, suspended the election campaign. Is it possible to assess the political consequences of the attack’s coming so shortly before the parliamentary elections? ... Read More »

International Women’s Day highlights – Women of the world, unite!

From protests to musical performances, strikes to sporting events - activities celebrating International Women's Day are taking place across the globe. DW reports on the latest events. As International Women's Day (IWD) rolls across the globe, individuals in countries everywhere are observing it through marches, protests, music, sports, strikes, at both local and national levels. While some of these events celebrate the achievements women make in the world everyday, others push for further gender equality and activism. Deutsche Welle brings you the latest highlights below. All updates in Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) 16:03 US President Donald Trump comments on International Women's Day (IWD) Trump, who in the past has been accused of harboring mysogynistic views on account of derogatory comments he had made about women, said on Twitter that he was "honoring the critical role of women here in America & around the world," adding in another tweet that he had "tremendous respect for women." 14:50 German women innovate in the digital realm One of the main battles for women today remains breaking into and rising to the top of traditionally male-dominated professions. While German politicians debate quotas for women in boardrooms and parliaments and how best to address the country's gender pay gap, women in technology are forging ahead at a grassroots level. Linda Kruse designs video games empowering girls to stand up for their rights while furthering their interest in STEM subjects. And other women, like Kim Salmon, fight tirelessly against online hate speech targeting outspoken females. 14:42 "Well-behaved women seldom make history" Everyone knows the famous quote from renowned historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich. But who are some of these revolutionary women who refused to stand down, rose to powerful positions, and changed the course of history? Here are DW's ten top picks: 14:34 Female lawyer in Malaysia fights for indigenous rights As a woman in a predominantly male profession, Siti Kasim knows what it means to have a marginalized voice. She has dedicated her legal career to campaigning for the rights of indigenous peoples and the LGBT community. "I could never see injustice or condescension of any sort since childhood. I cannot tolerate people who have no respect for others," she told DW. 14:26 Arab refugee women speak out about life in Germany In an interview with DW, female refugees from Arab countries commented on their new lives in Germany, including what women's rights means for them. 14:14 No to sexism and abortion restrictions in Poland Woman in Warsaw are protesting outside the headquarters of the Law and Justice party to demand the government loosen highly restrictive reproduction rights laws which the conservative government is looking to tighten. The recent declaration of Polish EU parliament representative Janusz Korwin-Mikke that women are "weaker," "smaller," and "less intelligent" than men - and thereby deserving of lesser pay - has further inflamed women's rights activists. 13:26 Lebanese women's rights activists march in Beirut Students, writers, and NGO activists began their walk through the streets of Lebanon's capital city from the Achrafieh Sassine square at noon local time. Organizers' demands include better representation in parliament, better legal protection for women, and a reform of the penal code. 13:08 Putin tweets IWD congratulations The Russian President highlighted women's roles as tireless family caretakers, stating "how do they manage it all?" He also said "we love and treasure you," before noting men's celebration of women through music and poetry. Russia has strong historic links to IWD. On March 8, 1917, women's worker protests kicked off the Russia Revolution that eventually led to the fall of the Romanov dynasty. The Soviet government enshrined the date as an official holiday shortly thereafter. 12:55 India launches Women Cricket League (WCL) The WCL aims to provide women cricketers on par with their male counterparts. League founder Parul Jain: "It's important that young girls see cricket as a viable option to play at the highest level...This will lead to greater interest in women's cricket in India, which has generally been given much less importance than the men's sport." India, a global cricket powerhouse, joins Australia and Great Britain as countries with leagues for women. 12:43 Silent women's voices in China Human Rights Watch (HRW) released a dispatch today condemning the Chinese government's stifling of women's rights activists. Last month, official censors temporarily shut down Women's Voices, a blog headed by Chinese feminists. HRW also critically spotlighted Beijing's restrictions on women's reproductive freedoms and government-sponsored campaigns pushing women over 27 - "leftovers" - to marry. 12:30 Women in Tokyo take to the streets Women marched through the streets of the Japanese capital demanding better pay and working hours. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's "womenomics" policy, aimed at increasing female labor force participation, has butted heads with an all-consuming work culture, increasing the burden for women who straddle home and office. New Zealand releases study on gender pay gap The country's government published its findings entitled "Empirical evidence of the gender pay gap in New Zealand" one day ahead of International Women's Day, the first comprehensive study since 2003. After revealing that 80 percent of the pay shortfall for women was "unexplained" - that is, due to conscious or unconscious bias - women have flocked to social media to share stories of employment bias. 12:04 Global work walk out by women As part of IWD, "A Day Without Women" initiative will see women around the world go on strike on Wednesday to draw attention to gender inequality in the workplace. In Australia, around 1,000 early childcare workers, a predominantly female sector, walked off the job at 15:20 local time (04:20 UTC) - the time after which Australian women begin working for free. 11:56 BBC Radio3 all-day broadcast of music by female composers - the classical music radio station of Britain's public broacasting network is devoting their March 8 airtime to women musicians of the past and present. A special highlight includes the live noontime broadcast and premiere of Fanny Mendelssohn's Easter Sonata for piano, a work long attributed to her younger brother Felix. 11:43 Google Doodle honors women pioneers - the internet giant highlights 13 women from around the world who broke through gender barriers in a variety of fields, including Miriam Makeba (South African civil rights activist and singer), Cecilia Grierson (Argentina's first medical degree recipient) and Lotifa El Nadi (Egypt's first female pilot). 11:42 IWD hashtags dominate Twitter - #BeBoldforChange, the campaign call of IWD 2017, along with multilingual #InternationalWomensDay hashtags, are drawing thousands of tweets from individuals, companies, politicians and activists around the world.

From protests to musical performances, strikes to sporting events – activities celebrating International Women’s Day are taking place across the globe. DW reports on the latest events. As International Women’s Day (IWD) rolls across the globe, individuals in countries everywhere are observing it through marches, protests, music, sports, strikes, at both local and national levels. While some of these events ... Read More »

Australia sues Audi, ignores Skoda

Australia's consumer watchdog has launched court action against Germany's Volkswagen brand Audi over the carmaker's emissions cheating scandal. It said it was seeking proper compensation for deceptive conduct. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) announced Wednesday it had begun legal proceedings in the country's Federal Court against German carmaker Audi over allegations that it misled clients about diesel emission levels in their cars. The watchdog said legal action was leveled at local subsidiary Audi Australia as well as Audi's German owner, Volkswagen. The ACCC alleged that between 2011 and 2015 Audi had "engaged in misleading conduct by not disclosing the existence and operation of defeat devices in certain Audi-branded vehicles." Chairman Rod Sims said in a statement the software used to manipulate emissions tests in the laboratory breached Australian consumer law. Skoda off the hook Roughly 12,000 Audi cars would be affected by the current proceedings, the ACCC reported. By contrast, Volkswagen's Skoda cars would not be affected as the commission decided not to pursue the matter due to the low volume of Skoda car sales in Australia. The watchdog is seeking pecuniary penalties and corrective advertising. The latest action followed court proceedings launched against Volkswagen-branded cars last year. In that lawsuit, the commission claimed that more than 57,000 vehicles sold in Australia did not operate as Volkswagen advertised. Since then, Volkswagen and Audi have announced voluntary recalls to update the software in question.

Australia’s consumer watchdog has launched court action against Germany’s Volkswagen brand Audi over the carmaker’s emissions cheating scandal. It said it was seeking proper compensation for deceptive conduct. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) announced Wednesday it had begun legal proceedings in the country’s Federal Court against German carmaker Audi over allegations that it misled clients about diesel emission ... Read More »

Adidas profits hit the billion mark

German sports goods maker Adidas has announced record profits for 2016, beating analysts' expectations. The Bavaria-based company said net profit topped a billion euros for the first time in the firm's history. The firm said Wednesday that annual net profit increased by 60.5 percent, to 1.02 billion euros ($1.07 billion). The announcement was a surprise to analysts, beating their predictions and the company's own forecast. Chief Executive Kasper Rorsted hailed 2016 as an "exceptional year" for the company, with double-digit growth in almost all regions of the world. It was a big year for sports that featured the Olympic Games in Rio and the European Football Championships in France. The three stripes Much of 2016's success for Adidas was down to strong growth of 16.6 percent at its central three-striped brand, accounting for the biggest share of its revenues. Subsidiary Reebok grew much more modestly at 1.1 percent. Overall revenues increased 14 percent to top 19 billion euros. The company also unveiled an optimistic forecast for this year. They predicted revenue growth of between 11 and 13 percent, adjusting for currency effects, and aim to increase profits by 18-20 percent to around 1.2 billion euros. Citing its strong results, Adidas said it would offer shareholders a dividend of 2 euros per share for 2016, up from 1.60 euros the previous year. After the news was announced, shares in the company leapt on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange. In early morning trading, the stock gained 8.2 percent, which added $2 billion to its market value. By mid-day it was still up over 7 percent, trading at around 171 euros per share.

German sports goods maker Adidas has announced record profits for 2016, beating analysts’ expectations. The Bavaria-based company said net profit topped a billion euros for the first time in the firm’s history. The firm said Wednesday that annual net profit increased by 60.5 percent, to 1.02 billion euros ($1.07 billion). The announcement was a surprise to analysts, beating their predictions ... Read More »

Frankfurt used as remote hacking base for the CIA: WikiLeaks

WikiLeaks documents reveal CIA agents were given cover identities and diplomatic passports to enter the country. The base was used to develop hacking tools as part of the CIA's massive digital arsenal. WikiLeaks released a trove of CIA documents on Tuesday that it claimed revealed details of its secret hacking arsenal. The release included 8,761 documents that it claimed revealed details of "malware, viruses, trojans, weaponized 'zero day' exploits, malware remote control systems and associated documentation." The leaks purportedly revealed that a top secret CIA unit used the German city of Frankfurt am Main as the starting point for numerous hacking attacks on Europe, China and the Middle East. Frankfurt base WikiLeaks reported that the group developed trojans and other malicious software in the American Consulate General Office, the largest US consulate in the world. The programs focused on targets in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. The documents revealed that CIA experts worked in the building under cover and included advice for life in Germany. "Do not leave anything electronic or sensitive unattended in your room," it told employees, also advising them to enjoy Lufthansa's free alcohol "in moderation." The Frankfurt hackers, part of the Center for Cyber Intelligence Europe, were said to be given diplomatic passports and a State Department identity. It instructed employees how to safely enter Germany. A WikiLeaks tweet published an section of the Frankfurt information. The consulate was the focus of a German investigation into US intelligence capabilities following the 2013 revelation that NSA agents had tapped Chancellor Angela Merkel's phone. German daily "Süddeutsche Zeitung" reported the building was known to be home to a vast network of intelligence personnel including CIA agents, NSA spies, military secret service personnel, Department of Homeland Security employees and Secret Service employees. It reported the Americans had also established a dense network of outposts and shell companies in Frankfurt. Televisions turned into bugs An intelligence expert who examined the dump, Rendition Infosec founder Jake Williams, told news agency Associated Press the documents appeared legitimate. Bob Ayers, a retired US intelligence official currently working as a security analyst told AP the release was "real bad" for the agency. Jonathan Liu, a spokesman for the CIA, told AP: "We do not comment on the authenticity or content of purported intelligence documents." According to WikiLeaks the documents revealed that the CIA could remotely activate certain Samsung smart televisions equipped with cameras and microphones to turn them into bugs. Smartphones hacked WikiLeaks also claimed that if the CIA had hacked a cell phone, it could then bypass encryption methods used by popular chat programs such as Whatsapp, Telegram, Signal and Confide. This prompted some concern at first online that all such messaging "Apps" were no longer effectively encrypted - but the exploit only applied to people whose phones are already compromised. According to the leaks, the CIA has undocumented exploits on popular smartphone models. In a series of tweets NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden said deliberately leaving vulnerabilities in software and hardware open left public users susceptible to attacks. Snowden said the documents appeared to be genuine. The documents also revealed that the CIA had the ability to conduct false flag attacks using malware stolen from other nations. According to WikiLeaks the trove showed that the CIA had lost control of its arsenal of hacking tools. WikiLeaks said it was given the files by an anonymous source who wanted to shed public light on the hacking programs. The collection of documents vastly outnumbered the trove on the NSA released by Snowden.

WikiLeaks documents reveal CIA agents were given cover identities and diplomatic passports to enter the country. The base was used to develop hacking tools as part of the CIA’s massive digital arsenal. WikiLeaks released a trove of CIA documents on Tuesday that it claimed revealed details of its secret hacking arsenal. The release included 8,761 documents that it claimed revealed ... Read More »

Children in Aleppo: ‘I’d rather die’

Aleppo has become "a slaughterhouse," says the UN Commissioner for Human Rights. The situation for children there is especially serious. Experts are warning of depression and suicidal thoughts among the young. The image burns itself into your brain: little Omran from the Syrian city of Aleppo sitting in an ambulance, staring into space, covered in blood, clothes torn, his hair full of dust. The photograph, taken by an activist a few weeks ago, provoked horror around the world. We can only surmise from this little child's stunned expression what the war in his homeland has done to him, and to many other children and youngsters like him. Aleppo has again been forced to endure weeks of bombing by the Syrian and Russian regimes. A ceasefire was in place over the weekend. Of all the cities caught up in the Syrian civil war, Aleppo is the most fiercely contested. According to the UN, more than 250,000 people are trapped under siege in the eastern part of town. The recent bombardments were the heaviest since the start of the war in 2011. In the last offensive alone, which began on September 22, more than 500 people were killed and 2,000 wounded. Around a quarter of the victims were children - and that number could rise dramatically, as the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) estimates that there are around 100,000 children and young people in eastern Aleppo. 'Medieval conditions' In an October 21 speech via video link to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Raad al Hussein, said the siege and bombardment of Aleppo "constitute crimes of historic proportions." This ancient Syrian city, "a place of millennial civility and beauty," was today, he said, "a slaughterhouse." Although Russia agreed to the ceasefire, the sick and injured could not be brought out of the city. The United Nations said it was unsafe to transport them, and secretary-general Ban Ki Moon pointed out that: "Under these medieval conditions, the vulnerable are suffering the most." Suicidal thoughts among children Katharina Ebel, the project advisor of SOS Children's Villages in Syria, confirmed that this is indeed the case. The children are under tremendous psychological strain, she said, warning of severe depression that could even lead to children having suicidal thoughts. "One boy who wanted to take his own life was only 12 years old," she told the "Passauer Neue Presse" newspaper. "So far we've always been able to prevent children from killing themselves," Ebel went on. But she reported that every day there are children who say, "I'd rather die than go on like this." Deep depression drives them to commit acts of aggression, against both themselves and others. "Many of them can't sleep any more, or have nightmares, and then they're completely exhausted during the day," she said. Children describe the rigors of their everyday lives on the website of UNICEF's #ChildrenofSyria campaign. Not only do they risk being killed on the way to school, the schools themselves are also often attacked - around 4,000 times since the war began. And even those who try to take shelter may be killed: The organization Save the Children has reported that so-called "bunker buster" bombs are being used. Some experiences are too extreme SOS Children's Villages have psychologists and social workers in every facility, "who talk to the children individually, try to alleviate their trauma, restore the children's sense of trust," Ebel said. "Sometimes it's just not possible, because what they've experienced is too extreme. Often, when a child has seen their parents die, seen them buried under rubble, seen their home destroyed, their sense of security is lost for a very long time." The Syrian winter will start to set in in just a few weeks' time. UNICEF warns that many children and their families have reached the end of their strength. Children are especially at risk from the freezing temperatures and snowstorms that have often occurred in recent years. The aid organization is also very worried about the children in the Iraqi city of Mosul, 600 kilometers (370 miles) further east. It warns that the current offensive to recapture the city means the more than 500,000 children and their families there are now in extreme danger.

Aleppo has become “a slaughterhouse,” says the UN Commissioner for Human Rights. The situation for children there is especially serious. Experts are warning of depression and suicidal thoughts among the young. The image burns itself into your brain: little Omran from the Syrian city of Aleppo sitting in an ambulance, staring into space, covered in blood, clothes torn, his hair ... Read More »

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